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Why do many students live disgustingly? Watch

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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Ooh your sister has a weekend, lucky her, that actually gives her a couple days when she doesn't have work to do so no it's not really more difficult for her to prioritise as such. Additionally it's a lot easier to clean up for yourself when there's one or two of you than when there's 5 or so of you, and if she's out 7.30-20.00 she's pretty unlikely to make any mess anyway.

    It's pretty easy to think that way, you get up as late as you can, or as late as you can while giving yourself time to make sure you're not rushed and then you just don't have the time to do anything extra in the morning or it screws up your schedule. Equally if you're just getting back from work you're not going to be in the mood to spend 15 minutes doing more work. You clean stuff as you need it or when you have a rare moment where you can spare the time to do a clean.

    Taking a collection to the tip requires a car and money, it costs quite a bit to drop something off at the tip. Both are things that most students don't really have.

    You're coming from the point of view of someone who has only been at school and has had other people in the house who are more responsible for keeping it clean. Once you experience the life of a university student which quickly becomes very 24/7 and comes with the variety that living with other people does you'll quickly realise that keeping your house spotless starts to drop on the priority list.
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    To me, this is absolutely fine.

    This just looks like a bunch of people have had pre-s and then gone out. Very unlikely that they're going to clear up before they go, but when they get round to it, it looks like less than 5 minutes work to chuck everything out (except that last Koppaberg and the 2 fingers of JD) and wipe up the work top. Nothing looks dirty really - there's just a lot of detritus.
    There is absolutely no way I could live like that at all; I wouldn't be able to make anything in that kitchen in that state. I wouldn't like thinking about the amount of people who'd been in there and what they'd done in there. If that's the minimum that happens the maximum is just not an option for me; I've now ruled out halls in the future!

    Regardless of how much work at university I'd have, it's never due the next day. I'd have time to have a spotless house with clean dishes and everything else. I plan my time well anyway; there's no way I wouldn't have half an hour or more to sort out the bin and the dishes, and do the rest.
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    My flat in halls is pretty clean and tidy - especially compared to some flats. We do have a cleaner that comes in every two weeks but we do most of the work through a rota. We also wash up our stuff after using it (or within a day at most) so nothing stacks up.

    Unite students?
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    To me, this is absolutely fine.

    This just looks like a bunch of people have had pre-s and then gone out. Very unlikely that they're going to clear up before they go, but when they get round to it, it looks like less than 5 minutes work to chuck everything out (except that last Koppaberg and the 2 fingers of JD) and wipe up the work top. Nothing looks dirty really - there's just a lot of detritus.
    And that's precisely the point, it's a differing of opinions. There's nothing really wrong with that picture and I'd totally expect students to have a night out

    That said, clearing up doesn't happen. The bottles get moved to the worktop above the bin but never get thrown out. That's normal for a night out. Imagine how many bottles were dumped there after 10 weeks. The alcohol spills on the floor don't really get mopped up. And the actually half arsed clean up doens't tend to happen until the afternoon of the day after. So anyone that's up (i.e. me and me only) is trying to make breakfast or lunch in that environment. Incidentally, on occasion something gets broken. I've come in to find chairs, the ceiling light and most recently the cooker all broken. Drunk students also do stupid things, like putting parts of the microwave or fridge food in the freezer.

    A lot of students would see this as fine. If you don't drink and don't make this sort of mess then you aren't used to it. I was totally aware and prepared for flat mates making this mess. The mess doesn't bother me. Yeah it's annoying but that's typicla students. What annoys me is the poor attempt to clean up and the disruption caused by noise and damages. Normal students think this is fine but I'd wager this would annoy the OP (not just the mess, the whole environment), hence why I posted it. This annoys me at 11pm when I want to sleep or 7am when I want breakfast. Most students that would look at this and think it were fine would probably be joining in. And that's the point I wanted to make. If you aren't that sort of student, you won't necessarily get on well with the people you live with.
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    Oh how terrible people living the way they want to, god. Personal freedom and choice is just the worst.
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    (Original post by clarkey500)

    Unite students?

    What gave it away? The god awful stalls? That's an entirely new can of worms for why I wouldn't live in halls again.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Oh how terrible people living the way they want to, god. Personal freedom and choice is just the worst.
    Nothing wrong with people living how they want. Excessive mess and excessive cleanliness are just as bad (although I'd rather have the latter over the former). Nobody wants to live with someone who nags them about being clean but nobody wants to live with someone who doens't pull their weight either. It's all about a balance.

    There's also a slight difference between public and private spaces. If your room is a mess then fine, do what you like. But if a public space like a kitchen is a mess then your attempt to live how you like (with freedom and choice) is causing problems for other people.

    At the end of the day nobody ever complained about things being too clean but you can be sure people complain where there's too much mess. Kinda determines which is worse.
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    The long and the short of this thread is that if you want to live in a spotless environment with no disturbances from people getting in late at night, you might not want to move into stalls (or with other students at all). There is a chance that your flatmates will be more messy than normal, but those are the chances that you take when you're moving in with people you don't know! Also, if you're the housemate who nags others to clear up (especially if you're being unreasonable about the level of cleanliness), your housemates won't like you and you probably won't get on.
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    Yeah students are filthy. They don't know how to look after themselves. It really is funny the people who are supposed to be the most educated don't even have the most basic of skills.

    I mean, you ask them to clean up and they say: 'I don't have time'

    You don't have time?

    You get up at 12, have 8 hours of lectures a week and do your assignments last minute! How can you have no time?
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    There is absolutely no way I could live like that at all; I wouldn't be able to make anything in that kitchen in that state. I wouldn't like thinking about the amount of people who'd been in there and what they'd done in there. If that's the minimum that happens the maximum is just not an option for me; I've now ruled out halls in the future!
    I wouldn't say it's a regular issue (one night a week, maybe two) but I would say that sort of environment is normal for 95% of students. And because it's all down to luck there's a good chance you will end up with someone that likes to have the odd party every now and then.

    It is important to find a balance though. I'm not saying you have to live with that sort of mess but it's not something a wipe down with hot water and disinfectant won't fix. If you go to halls though be prepared to see this sort of thing at least once while you're there. Freshers week and last week (first week back after Christmas) are the worst.
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    It often depends on how they were brought up. Some parents don't care about clutter/dirt.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    What gave it away? The god awful stalls? That's an entirely new can of worms for why I wouldn't live in halls again.
    No, we have circular wooden tops on 4 metal legs. It was the signs, sofa and worktop.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    I was at a student house yesterday, and it was a complete tip. Mess everywhere on the floor, the bin was overflowing and rubbish was being purposely put around it, the bathroom was dirty, the kitchen was filthy was washing up and old food everywhere, the bedroom I went in had laundry everywhere and pizza boxes and beer bottles strewn across the floor, everywhere needed hoovering and parts of the house were damp.

    Why do students choose to live like this? Do they want to get sick and/or live in chaos and mess? I'm 16 but I couldn't live like that at ll; if something needs cleaning or doing no matter how big or small, I just get on and do it. It disgusts me how people live everyday like this; I was told seven people live in that house, I don't see how none of them can be bothered to look after where they live.
    No, messy people (like me) are happy to live in a mess. Neat people aren't.
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    (Original post by clarkey500)
    No, we have circular wooden tops on 4 metal legs. It was the signs, sofa and worktop.
    Fair enough, I've seen other unite flats with those stools so assumed they were the same for all of us. But yeah, pretty dead giveaways there
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    (Original post by alcibiade)
    No, messy people (like me) are happy to live in a mess. Neat people aren't.
    Why are you happy to live in a mess? Do you like not knowing where your things are, being dirty, smelly, unhygienic and having less space?
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Most people aren't as bad as that, obviously, but it's mostly because we've got more important stuff to do, or we've got so much more important stuff to do that we need a break and can't afford the time. When you're working 10-5 or sometimes 9-12 or 9-4 when **** hits the fan for 7 days a week for 2 months straight you don't really prioritise washing dishes.

    As for the overflowing bins they might not have a choice, it's pretty easy for stuff to pile up if you miss a collection and it's pretty easy to miss a collection over the holidays because you can't really put your bin out or you'll get fined for leaving it on the pavement for a couple weeks.
    University is a holiday compared to having even a relatively cushy nine-to-five job.

    Though as you said, if you don't mind squalor then that's absolutely fine.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Why are you happy to live in a mess? Do you like not knowing where your things are, being dirty, smelly, unhygienic and having less space?
    You simply don't see it or notice it, but are concentrating on different things. Now, of course, my wife (who is neat) does see it and it actively irritates her.
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    My housemate is really messy and doesn't clean after herself.
    If I want our kitchen to be neat, I have to clean myself on almost daily basis and I have no time for that
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    My housemate is really messy and doesn't clean after herself.
    If I want our kitchen to be neat, I have to clean myself on almost daily basis and I have no time for that
    I'm sure you have at least half an hour before you go to bed? I did the vaccuming at 10:30 last night; I made the time to do something that needed doing.
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    I think a distinction needs to be made between poor overseas students sharing houses in overcrowded conditions (who still eat extremely well, typically rice/pickle/curry) and outright degenerate scum who live off takeaways, crates of beer and revel in a debauched lifestyle.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Are most people in halls like this then? If they are I think I'm just going to live on my own (I can afford to), as I don't think I could stand living in fear of mess and noise. Just before students went university I had assumed their parents would give them a crash course in how to keep a house/flat clean and how to do basic life jobs, like washing and vacuuming.

    Do you not get freaked out if you have to prepare meals and have your stuff in a messy kitchen, when it's still dirty from other people's stuff? I know I would; even when my own stuff was clean and put away I'd be paranoid about contamination from the air and physical things around me.
    As pointed out many times above its their first time living away from home. Not everyone is like this (its down to the randomness of who you get to live with), but some are used to parents tidying up for them. Luckily you, can live on your own or maybe get a butler?
 
 
 
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