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    (Original post by lewman99)
    Hi, I've got a quick question for fablereader (I tried to tag you earlier but it didn't work for whatever reason). If I reapply next year, I'm considering choosing Merton. How was it when you were there for interviews?
    When you type in the name, type in part of it, wait for the boxes to pop up below, then click on the right name. When the name's blue, you've tagged that person.

    Well, I really liked it. It felt just like the right size for me. The JCR was frequently packed after breakfast whenever I was there (except for when they had a bar quiz in the evening; unfortunately, I cannot attest to how good it was, as I didn't realize what was happening. :facepalm:) The two Classics tutors who interviewed me there were nice (I'm not counting the tutors across the road, who tore me apart but I think may have belonged to a different college, I'm not entirely sure). When I lost my key, they were kind enough to come down when I phoned them, even when I got the location wrong at first (again, :facepalm:). I didn't talk to many people, but everyone seemed to be chatting to one another in JCR and dining hall. My one real complaint (because I'm a picky eater) is that the food was not always something I liked (i.e. they had fish one night), but a) I'm betting most people have a more varied diet than mine and b) they have a schedule in front of the dining hall for the week which you can check. Any more questions, please feel free to ask.
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    (Original post by fablereader)
    When you type in the name, type in part of it, wait for the boxes to pop up below, then click on the right name. When the name's blue, you've tagged that person.

    Well, I really liked it. It felt just like the right size for me. The JCR was frequently packed after breakfast whenever I was there (except for when they had a bar quiz in the evening; unfortunately, I cannot attest to how good it was, as I didn't realize what was happening. :facepalm:) The two Classics tutors who interviewed me there were nice (I'm not counting the tutors across the road, who tore me apart but I think may have belonged to a different college, I'm not entirely sure). When I lost my key, they were kind enough to come down when I phoned them, even when I got the location wrong at first (again, :facepalm:). I didn't talk to many people, but everyone seemed to be chatting to one another in JCR and dining hall. My one real complaint (because I'm a picky eater) is that the food was not always something I liked (i.e. they had fish one night), but a) I'm betting most people have a more varied diet than mine and b) they have a schedule in front of the dining hall for the week which you can check. Any more questions, please feel free to ask.
    Thanks for your help! I did get the feeling that St. John's was a bit too big for my liking, so something that feels a bit smaller would be really nice. I'm something of a picky eater myself, but I've been trying to branch out a bit lately so I hope it wouldn't be too much of a problem.
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    (Original post by lewman99)
    Thanks for your help! I did get the feeling that St. John's was a bit too big for my liking, so something that feels a bit smaller would be really nice. I'm something of a picky eater myself, but I've been trying to branch out a bit lately so I hope it wouldn't be too much of a problem.
    It may be, it may not be. If that night's menu is a problem, there are restaurants nearby for food, or you could just go there for the dessert.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    That's odd. There's no admissions test for bio so afaik it's just grades as interview selection. The lack of predicted grades could have been an issue, but not enough to deselect you I suspect. With no admissions test or submitted work, it must have been related to grades/lack of predictions/PS. Your school's reference wasn't particularly poor/bad quality, was it?

    Times like this make me wish they had transparent detailed feedback. xD
    My reference was very good, so I think it's on me but it's pretty annoying not to know what could be better.
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    (Original post by funkygirl14)
    Hey, did you all ask for feedback or did your UCAS referee receive it automatically? My rejection letter promised that the college will send feedback to my referee within a few weeks, and I know it's only been a mere 2 weeks, but many applicants have clearly received feedback and I have yet to! Do you think I should email the college asking for feedback to be sent to me, or wait it out in hopes of my referee receiving something?
    Someone pleasee helpppp
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    (Original post by funkygirl14)
    Someone pleasee helpppp
    No harm sending the admissions tutor for your college a reminder email with: "Greetings, two weeks has elapsed since my request for feedback and I would like this to be forwarded to myself and/or my UCAS referee when possible".

    PS Don't expect the feedback to be very detailed, from what I've heard.
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    Course: Medicine
    College: Merton
    Ox or Cam: Oxford
    Interviewed? (yes/no): No
    Feedback?: BMAT score too low
    School type: Grammar School
    GCSE: 12 A*s
    AS: N/A
    A2 predictions: 4 A*s
    Other qualification (eg IB, AP, etc): N/A
    Strengths: Working hard, organisation,
    Weaknesses: Over-working and getting stressed on exam day
    What you aim to work on: Not getting stressed on exam day xD
    What your plans are: Try to achieve my predicted grades and maybe apply for Cambridge for 2018 entry. Get a job in a local care home and continue volunteering and wider reading.

    If anyone is reapplying for Oxbridge medicine despite having other medicine offers can you PM me?
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    (Original post by Ecds)
    If anyone is reapplying for Oxbridge medicine despite having other medicine offers can you PM me?
    Can i ask why you are considering this? There's every chance you won't get ANY offers back if you give them up and reapply. Nevermind adding an Oxbridge offer 2nd time around.

    Your university is not important for a career in medicine.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Can i ask why you are considering this? There's every chance you won't get ANY offers back if you give them up and reapply. Nevermind adding an Oxbridge offer 2nd time around.

    Your university is not important for a career in medicine.

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    Because I really like the traditional course at Oxford - I potentially want to go into research and I like the idea of mandatory intercalation. Similarly I love the tutorial system there and was inspired whenever I've visited there before.

    I don't want to spend my life regretting not trying again and when I was practicing for the BMAT I was doing really well. In the actual day I panicked and so I don't think it was a representative snapshot of how I could do.

    When I think about my two offers now all I can think about is how I might be better of re-applying because I think I'll always be thinking "what if"?

    I'm very well aware that university doesn't matter with medicine. But I am also very aware that overall happiness and the potential for future regret are things that must also be considered.

    This isn't something I've thought about lightly - I've been thinking about it for about 2 - 3 months.
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    (Original post by Ecds)
    When I think about my two offers now all I can think about is how I might be better of re-applying because I think I'll always be thinking "what if"?

    I'm very well aware that university doesn't matter with medicine. But I am also very aware that overall happiness and the potential for future regret are things that must also be considered.

    This isn't something I've thought about lightly - I've been thinking about it for about 2 - 3 months.
    A good point and well considered.

    As long as you're aware of the risks involved, the fact that where you graduate from doesn't matter for medicine, the incredibly competitive nature of medicine applications (60% don't get any offers I think the statistic was?) and the very low acceptance rate at Oxbridge for medicine (~10% at Oxford, 5 applications per place at Cambridge) then if you have your heart in it, you can give it a go. Two offers however with medicine is a great achievement and definitely shows you're bright, capable and hard-working.
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    General question: would it be worth a reapplication if it was specifically your interview that let you down?

    My scores are near perfect and I applied for Law 2017 entry but in my feedback I was told that it was the interview that specifically let me down. My grades were good, my LNAT MCQ results were 'good', not exceptional or abysmal but much higher than the national average and I was told that my LNAT essay was 'excellent' and put me in the top 1/3 of applicants but that my interview put me in the bottom 1/3 of applicants.

    I'm now wondering if it's worth a reapplication? On the one hand, all the applicants I met had been through multiple practice interviews and seemed to know exactly what to expect, whereas because of my slightly different circumstances (I'm not a recent school leaver) I didn't really have teachers to prep me through the interview so only went in with the vague idea that there would be 'a case study' that we would be questioned on. I now actually know what to expect and know that I would approach it differently.

    On the other hand, people do say that the process is designed to test instinct and reasoning, rather than anything else that can be coached into someone. I suppose my confidence is just a bit shaken because I didn't think my interview was great, but I didn't think it was *that* terrible- and if it was bad enough to cancel out an extremely strong LNAT essay, I feel as though perhaps the judgement is correct that I just don't have what it takes :/

    Has anyone been in a similar situation?
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    (Original post by Nausea 1979)
    General question: would it be worth a reapplication if it was specifically your interview that let you down?
    It is possible to improve interview performance. It is, however, as you suggest, harder to improve than grades or objective measures like the admissions test.

    On one hand, it is not as if you have had loads of practice - as you said you're not a recent school leaver. Having that insight of a second time can be really useful, especially if it was down to nerves.

    People do say that it's impossible to "teach" and on some level they are correct in that there is no absolute formula with (subjective) interviews. It is far more about how you think (but remember everyone thinks differently) than what you know of the law (provided your knowledge isn't lacking to the extent you can't debate properly).

    I will say however that law is a notoriously difficult subject and many candidates end up scoring 9 or 10/10 in their interviews, even with very good grades. Only you can really know whether a) it's worth reapplying (eg gap year) and b) whether you have what it takes to really develop your interview skills through practice (debate, reasoning, critical thinking, passion, communication).

    I wish I had a straightforward yes/no answer for you but ultimately it is a personal decision.
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    (Original post by auburnstar)
    It is possible to improve interview performance. It is, however, as you suggest, harder to improve than grades or objective measures like the admissions test.

    On one hand, it is not as if you have had loads of practice - as you said you're not a recent school leaver. Having that insight of a second time can be really useful, especially if it was down to nerves.

    People do say that it's impossible to "teach" and on some level they are correct in that there is no absolute formula with (subjective) interviews. It is far more about how you think (but remember everyone thinks differently) than what you know of the law (provided your knowledge isn't lacking to the extent you can't debate properly).

    I will say however that law is a notoriously difficult subject and many candidates end up scoring 9 or 10/10 in their interviews, even with very good grades. Only you can really know whether a) it's worth reapplying (eg gap year) and b) whether you have what it takes to really develop your interview skills through practice (debate, reasoning, critical thinking, passion, communication).

    I wish I had a straightforward yes/no answer for you but ultimately it is a personal decision.
    Thanks for this! The gap year thing doesn't really bother me as I'm not a school leaver, I have a good job and will just continue working, slotting the reapplication around my work. In hindsight, with the knowledge of rejection, I can see what I might have done incorrectly- but it does get me that my interview was specifically mentioned as being in the bottom 1/3, meaning that (I think) it wasn't merely 'meh' but actively 'bad', but perhaps I'm just overthinking this.

    I just wondered if anyone had been in a similar situation and fluffed up an interview, and whether they had any tips on how to approach it differently the second time around (aside from the obvious reading etc)?

    I'm actually a fairly confident person and I wasn't a bundle of nerves going in (mostly because I'm not an A-Level student who would have to find back up plans for a year, I have a job and I definitely didn't view it as a be all and end all as you have a greater tendency to do at 17/18), but I think the lack of practice did throw me off- for one, I wasn't expecting the case study to be anywhere near as long as it was, and if I had known I would have taken a different approach, and also I think knowing exactly what kind of things you will be asked is really helpful for getting your mind into a space where you can think analytically, rather than wondering what the next question is going to be and whether it is going to trip you up.

    I also applied to one of the regular colleges last time (Exeter), so I wonder if it might be worth going for the mature students college this time as I'm in my late 20s...

    If nothing else, I'm subbing to this thread for positive vibes and to see other peoples' journeys and outcomes!
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    (Original post by Nausea 1979)
    I also applied to one of the regular colleges last time (Exeter), so I wonder if it might be worth going for the mature students college this time as I'm in my late 20s...
    Or Cambridge... they have mature colleges too.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Or Cambridge... they have mature colleges too.

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    Unfortunately I already have a 1st degree so would be self funding. Cambridge's college fees are around 7k-9k, which on top of 9k fees and living expenses is simply out of my reach.
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    (Original post by Nausea 1979)
    Unfortunately I already have a 1st degree so would be self funding. Cambridge's college fees are around 7k-9k, which on top of 9k fees and living expenses is simply out of my reach.
    Ah!

    What about as an affiliate student (2 years instead of 3)? Still out of reach?

    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...aduate-degrees

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Ah!

    What about as an affiliate student (2 years instead of 3)? Still out of reach?

    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...aduate-degrees

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    Yes, unfortunately it is A lot of Oxford colleges don't charge college fees at all for 2nd BA students as long as they are home students and I just can't justify an extra 11k per year (22k or 33k overall is a huge difference) for Cambridge.
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    (Original post by natashamay99)
    What your plans are: If i get 2 A*s or more, reapply, work for a bit and travel

    Looking for advice: do I have a realistic chance of getting a PPE interview with my a-levels?
    Yea, especially if your A*s are in maths, FM and/or econ (although if you had A* in physics and A* in one of the other three that's probably fine). PPE/E&M is a seriously competitive course though so three A*s is better. You'd still have to do an entrance test though if I'm remembering correctly which will be important in deciding whether to invite you for an interview or not. And of course, you'd need to do further reading and practice interview skills (don't know how much of econ is essay writing so could be worth getting to grips with eg building arguments etc especially for PPE). But just based on getting those grades I'd say it's realistic!
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    (Original post by natashamay99)
    I'm not too keen on management and really enjoy politics so I'm struggling to decide which is better overall (chance of getting in and enjoyability) :/
    Then there's no point applying for E&M.

    Have you also considered HSPS at Cambridge?

    Politics strand: http://www.polis.cam.ac.uk/study-at-...tive#section-3
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...tical-sciences
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Then there's no point applying for E&M.

    Have you also considered HSPS at Cambridge?

    Politics strand: http://www.polis.cam.ac.uk/study-at-...tive#section-3
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...tical-sciences
    I second Doonesbury's view - no point in applying for a joint subject where you're not keen on half of the course. xD HSPS and PPE are good choices. As long as history and/or politics isn't a requirement for the course you can always do loads of external reading in your own time and become familiar w different political/historical views etc
 
 
 
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