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If gender is a social construct, then transsgenderism is a delusion Watch

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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Etymology is the study of the origin of words Captain Haddock. In this context it does not prove anything. I am interested in the semantics/the meaning (not the etymology) of the words from which gender is derived. I am interested in the semantics/the meaning of the word 'Genus' in particular. That is my argument.
    And presumably the meaning of the word 'genus' is relevant because it is the origin of the word 'gender'. In other words, it is its, you guessed it, etymology.

    More specifically, etymology is the 'study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history'. So you have it backwards here. The semantics/meanings of the words that 'gender' originated from are not important. Words and their meanings change over time. Why on earth would you insist on defining 'gender' according to the meaning of the word it derived from, as opposed to the way it is currently understood? Do you do that with any other words? No, of course you don't.
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    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    I don't think there's such thing as a "male brain" or a "female brain". I was watching a documentary on children with gender dysphoria and a neuroscientist was saying how someone (presumably scientists), if faced with a brain on its own, would not be able to determine the biological sex of the person it came from.
    I'm going to give you some quick examples of differences between the male and the female brain that we are taught in medicine.

    The diencephalon is a part of the brain. A tiny part of the diencephalon is occupied by a small cluster of cells called the hypothalamus. This tiny part of the brain is very different between men and women. Part of its job is to control the release of hormones by an even tinier part of the brian called the pituatroy gland, which is even more different between women and men, in its structure and in the chemicals that it produces and releases. These chemicals have specific functions that affect the way we develop, the way we think, the way we behave, the way we feel and because they are different in women than they are in men, women and men wind up developing, thinking and feeling differently in those areas affected by the hypothalamus and the pituitary...and this is just one tiny part of the brain. One tiny example. One tiny part of human anatomy which make the two genders unique ..you can identify this difference using a simple blood test....Other examples; the male brain is typically larger than the female brain (please do not misconstrue this for meaning that men are more intelligent...larger brain mass does not not equate to greater intelligence)...The differences between male and female brains are clear in diseases as well...for example a woman who develops a pituitary adenoma (this is a tumor of the pituitary gland) will develop different symptoms to a male who develops the same exact disease....my friend, saying that there is no difference between the female and male brain is comical to anyone with a basic level of education in medicine. We are taught the differences as part of our curriculum.

    Plant...there are countless documentaries online about sasquatch full of 'scientists' arguing of irrefutable evidence for its existence.....media is not a source for reliable information. I encourage people to look up the book that I referenced above. It is written for lays. Anyone can understand it.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    I'm going to give you some quick examples of differences between the male and the female brain that we are taught in medicine. The diencephalon is a part of the brain. A tiny part of the diencephalon is occupied by a small cluster of cells called the hypothalamus. This tiny part of the brain is very different between men and women. Part of its job is to control the release of hormones by an even tinier part of the brian called the pituatroy gland, which is even more different between women and men, in its structure and in the chemicals that it produces and releases. These chemicals have specific functions that affect the way we develop, the way we think, the way behave, the way we feel and because they are different in women than they are in men, women and men wind up developing, thinking and feeling differently in those areas affected by the hypothalamus and the pituitary...and this is just one tiny part of the brain. One tiny example. One tiny part of human anatomy which make the two genders unique ..you can tell the difference between a female and male brain using a simple blood test....Other examples; the male brain is typically larger than the fame brain (please do not misconstrue this for meaning that men are more intelligent...larger brain mass does not not equate to greater intelligence)...The differences between male and female brains are clear in diseases as well...for example a woman who develops a pituitary adenoma (this is a tumor of the pituitary gland) will develop different symptoms to a male who develops the same exact disease....my friend, saying that there is no difference between the female and male brain is comical to anyone with a basic level of education in medicine. We are taught the differences as part of our curriculum.

    Plant...there are countless documentaries online about sasquatch full of 'scientists' arguing of irrefutable evidence for its existence.....media is not a source for reliable information. I encourage people to look up the book that I referenced above. It is written for lays. Anyone can understand it.
    To add (and I'm quoting):
    "Maps of neural circuitry showed that on average women's brains were highly connected across the left and right hemispheres, in contrast to men's brains, where the connections were typically stronger between the front and back regions."
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    (Original post by Captain Haddock)
    And presumably the meaning of the word 'genus' is relevant because it is the origin of the word 'gender'. In other words, it is its, you guessed it, etymology.

    More specifically, etymology is the 'study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history'. So you have it backwards here. The semantics/meanings of the words that 'gender' originated from are not important. Words and their meanings change over time. Why on earth would you insist on defining 'gender' according to the meaning of the word it derived from, as opposed to the way it is currently understood? Do you do that with any other words? No, of course you don't.
    let me break this down for you so I can help you see what I was trying to say.

    RobMl's argument is that gender is a social construct by definition. My counterargument was that it is not. in science we classify gender based on biology/genus. This has not changed to this day. The meaning of genus from which we define gender in science has not changed to this day. We still base it on the same exact things in biology. We still classify gender based on genus which we derive from the physiology and anatomy of creatures. The origin of the word and how it has changed does not prove ANYTHING without context!!!!!!!!!!! I hope that this will help you understand what I was trying to say.

    Additionally, i don't know if you realise this or not but with this comment of yours you are refuting RobMLs argument that gender is social construct ...because his entire argument is based on the definition of the word. My counter argument was that it is not. if anything me and you agree.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Louann Brizendine is a world renowned researcher in the human brain.
    A quick search reveals that she's more of a pop-academic. Students are usually told very early on to be sceptical of popular "bestseller" academic (or pseudo-academic) books. Not that they're all rubbish - it's a mix of pretty decent stuff, halfway decent stuff, and total nonsense - but that commercial pressures are invariably different from academic ones.

    Sure, most pop-academics are experts who know their stuff, but "experts who know their stuff" aren't actually that rare. Pop-academics are commercially successful not because of the accuracy and research quality of their books, but because they i) have an engaging writing style, and, most significantly, ii) write things which are interesting to a lay reader. What Brizendine's publishers were interested in was neither scientific truth nor political correctness, but rather what would get consumer attention and sell lots of books. Brizendine herself has admitted that she exaggerates her points, and that this is probably why her books sell.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Etymology is the study of the origin of words Captain Haddock. In this context it does not prove anything. I am interested in the semantics/the meaning (not the etymology) of the words from which gender is derived. I am interested in the semantics/the meaning of the word 'Genus' in particular. That is my argument.
    Which is 100% irrelevant from what Rob said.

    Your point is irrelevant. Who cares?


    (Original post by CookieButter)
    let me break this down for you so I can help you see what I was trying to say.

    RobMl's argument is that gender is a social construct by definition. My counterargument was that it is not. in science we classify gender based on biology/genus. This has not changed to this day. The meaning of genus from which we define gender in science has not changed to this day. We still base it on the same exact things in biology. We still classify gender based on genus which we derive from the physiology and anatomy of creatures. The origin of the word and how it has changed does not prove ANYTHING without context!!!!!!!!!!! I hope that this will help you understand what I was trying to say.

    Additionally, i don't know if you realise this or not but with this comment of yours you are refuting RobMLs argument that gender is social construct ...because his entire argument is based on the definition of the word. My counter argument was that it is not. if anything me and you agree.
    By definition - given how it is being used in the modern language. Not by etymological, archaic, pedantic definition.

    And what you say doesn't at all refute that. Stop being such a pedant :O
 
 
 
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