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Don't have any 'hobbies' watch

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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Exactly. I have lots of 'achievements', but my main hobbies are going out with my mates, and getting drunk in the pub, both of which I can't mention! It's a shame unis don't appreciate honesty more, they'd love the wall theorem I'm sure!
    They'd probably want it demonstrated.

    (Original post by Invisible)
    It's also interesting how this "utter love, passion, drive and determination" to do certain extra-curricular activities suddenly appears just before the UCAS form is completed, and magically dissapears when the form and process is complete.
    I know...but the consolation is that all the people who spend three-quarters of the form ********ting about their hobbies don't actually include enough about why they want to get on the university course and will be rejected.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    I know...but the consolation is that all the people who spend three-quarters of the form ********ting about their hobbies don't actually include enough about why they want to get on the university course and will be rejected.
    Also, being good at sport is irrelevant when applying for a degree, simple.

    Contrary to popular belief, enjoying sports that you do is more important than achieving things in sports, it's important to be happy and self secure, not trying to change your ways for whoever.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    Also, being good at sport is irrelevant when applying for a degree, simple.

    Contrary to popular belief, enjoying sports that you do is more important than achieving things in sports, it's important to be happy and self secure, not trying to change your ways for whoever.
    Heh, to your first point I must say that there are some people who have gotten into Oxbridge with dodgy academic credentials if they just happened to be national-standard or better at rugby or rowing. It happens a lot more at American colleges though, where you can even get in on a football scholarship (an oxymoron if I ever heard one).

    I totally agree with your second point...I've never been very competitive. I dislike competition most of the time because someone always ends up feeling bad and it's not necessary...of course there are times you have to compete when there are too many people and not enough opportunities, but I think the easygoing types that enjoy what they do even if they don't do it very well will have a less stressful life than those who feel like they have to win at everything.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    . I dislike competition most of the time because someone always ends up feeling bad and it's not necessary...of course there are times you have to compete when there are too many people and not enough opportunities, but I think the easygoing types that enjoy what they do even if they don't do it very well will have a less stressful life than those who feel like they have to win at everything.
    Well said and I agree entirely.

    The concept of competitive sport for enjoyments sake is naive and untrue in reality; ideally it would be great, but in reality it's a completely different keetle of fish, as I should know.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    The concept of competitive sport for enjoyments sake is naive and untrue in reality; ideally it would be great, but in reality it's a completely different keetle of fish, as I should know.
    Been in a few scrapes?
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    I am going to say that the Silver Duke of Edinburgh Award nearly killed me...
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    (Original post by Wise One)
    I am going to say that the Silver Duke of Edinburgh Award nearly killed me...
    I'm going to say that the Gold one is killing me.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Been in a few scrapes?
    Well I play snooker, I'm not bothered about the competitive aspect as such now, it's not really important; it was more important to my dad really! :rolleyes:

    Let's just say, I learnt the truth, such as the "cheating", "mind games" and confidence/deconfidence tricks that's involved, so it isn't simply "enjoying playing", that's complete rubbish.

    It's simply about the stat; whether one wins/loses. :rolleyes:

    Consequently though, i find I enjoy playing much more with the pressure off, and my game seems to be in nice tick as well.
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    Well I play snooker, I'm not bothered about the competitive aspect as such now, it's not really important; it was more important to my dad really! :rolleyes:
    Sounds like the noncompetitiveness suits you. Reminds me of the Malcolm in the Middle episode when the dad's playing basketball against the three kids, and he's fouling like crazy to score because they're better than he is, then he turns around at the end of the game and says, "Boys, part of playing games is learning how to lose gracefully. If there's anything I've taught you, it's how to be a good sportsman." Funny show.
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    lie
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    I completely agree that all this hobby mallarky is nonsense. Obviously nearly everyone enjoys doin something in their free time but shouldn't need documentation to prove it. I enjoy cricket, badminton and table tennis but haven't really had an opportunity to play any of these to any level because my school doesn't have any teams and there are hardly any local cricket teams in central london!

    At the end of the day people will lie about their hobbies and i for one think its disgraceful that if two people had the same academic level but one did more sport or music, then that person may get in. People who play grade 8 and wot not aren't going to be better in their field, infact quite the contrary since the person who got the grade 8 may end up liking his music more than his degree.

    Playing a sport or music to some level is a great achievement but i don't think it should play a significant role in the admissions process especially for something like medicine.

    My 2 p :cool:
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    unless its sports related obviously playing sport will give you an active advantage.
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    (Original post by Adil Bhai)
    Playing a sport or music to some level is a great achievement but i don't think it should play a significant role in the admissions process especially for something like medicine.

    My 2 p :cool:
    I agree.

    The achievement is a personal one and it shouldn't influence non-related aspects such as degree application etc.

    It's completely irrelevant infact, really..
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    Jus a quick query... do you think it is okay to say "I have recently taken up chess again after previously representing my school" when yes I have taken up chess again about 2 months ago but I represented my school now nearly 4 years ago (did play a fair few matches though).

    Generally I agree, most of my spare time is spent out therefore there isn't much in the way of 'in my free time' or hobbies in the ps.
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    TBH this hobby stuff is pretty important imo, otherwise how do you expect univs to differentiate between 4A students, esp the ones who arent able to ask all applicants for an interview.
    Secondly it shows you can mingle with people and socialize outside of academia/the classroom, they can't just have wet trouts attending the uni otherwise it would be awful.
    Finally, it shows that you don't spend your whole life with your head in a book, and that you can balance funtime with worktime...being successful at both...hence say captaining xyz sporting team etc and getting good grades.
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    (Original post by Amrad)
    Jus a quick query... do you think it is okay to say "I have recently taken up chess again after previously representing my school" when yes I have taken up chess again about 2 months ago but I represented my school now nearly 4 years ago (did play a fair few matches though).

    Generally I agree, most of my spare time is spent out therefore there isn't much in the way of 'in my free time' or hobbies in the ps.
    i dont see why not....if you apply for a science/maths though and you have an interview, be prepared to perhaps play a game at the interview...i played a game with the interviewer at one of mine lol
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    TBH this hobby stuff is pretty important imo, otherwise how do you expect univs to differentiate between 4A students, esp the ones who arent able to ask all applicants for an interview.
    Secondly it shows you can mingle with people and socialize outside of academia/the classroom, they can't just have wet trouts attending the uni otherwise it would be awful.
    Finally, it shows that you don't spend your whole life with your head in a book, and that you can balance funtime with worktime...being successful at both...hence say captaining xyz sporting team etc and getting good grades.
    I think this is were it is important to differentiate between hobbies and extra curricular activities. The former dosen't really show anything constructive; yes I suppose it does show you can socialise, but that is often in an environment with people you know quite well, which university isn't like. Extra curriculars carry a lot more weight, they often show organisation skills and the type of socialising which is more relevant to university, eg, often in a more formal environment, but more importantly often with people you don't know that well.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    I think this is were it is important to differentiate between hobbies and extra curricular activities. The former dosen't really show anything constructive; yes I suppose it does show you can socialise, but that is often in an environment with people you know quite well, which university isn't like. Extra curriculars carry a lot more weight, they often show organisation skills and the type of socialising which is more relevant to university, eg, often in a more formal environment, but more importantly often with people you don't know that well.
    But you can't choose what you want to be interested in, and secondly, most extra cc's are done with people in school (if your school have any), as with hobbies.
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    I can understand the importance of activities that demonstrate you have commitment and communication skills though, like charity work. But most people who put that down on their PSs are exaggerating as well.
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    But unis know that people of do extra-cirriculars to have something to put on their UCAS form, or at least that's often the case, and people can easily lie about their hobbies, so it does seem a bit weird that that sort of info is used to pick candidates.
 
 
 
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