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    Hi, I'm in first year of a STEM course in Queen's University, Belfast. When originally applying to University, I was close to choosing Law, and close to applying to Cambridge to do so. I've regretted my choice not to ever since, and now would like to right that wrong. I've already applied to change my degree at my current University to Law, but I still regret not applying to Cambridge, and I'm considering drastic measures to correct this.

    Currently, I have As in Religious Studies and Psychology and a B in Physics at A-Level, as well as an A in Sociology at AS. Naturally, if I were to apply successfully to Cambridge to study Law, my A-Level portfolio would have to be improved. As I'm already older than I'd like to be when starting a degree (though I do think my maturity and understanding of the work required to succeed has improved since I took my A-Levels), my plan is to fast-track and complete 2 A-Levels in a year (I live in Northern Ireland, so this would be undertaken at Belfast Met).

    Assuming I could get A*/A or 2 A*s, as I believe I could, would this be enough to actually get a conditional offer? It would give me the grades necessary, but with some of the subjects having been completed in a previous year. Is it necessary to achieve all of the grades at once, or would this - in conjunction with a good performance at interview and tests - be enough to get me where I want to go?
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    (Original post by RQR)
    Hi, I'm in first year of a STEM course in Queen's University, Belfast. When originally applying to University, I was close to choosing Law, and close to applying to Cambridge to do so. I've regretted my choice not to ever since, and now would like to right that wrong. I've already applied to change my degree at my current University to Law, but I still regret not applying to Cambridge, and I'm considering drastic measures to correct this.

    Currently, I have As in Religious Studies and Psychology and a B in Physics at A-Level, as well as an A in Sociology at AS. Naturally, if I were to apply successfully to Cambridge to study Law, my A-Level portfolio would have to be improved. As I'm already older than I'd like to be when starting a degree (though I do think my maturity and understanding of the work required to succeed has improved since I took my A-Levels), my plan is to fast-track and complete 2 A-Levels in a year (I live in Northern Ireland, so this would be undertaken at Belfast Met).

    Assuming I could get A*/A or 2 A*s, as I believe I could, would this be enough to actually get a conditional offer? It would give me the grades necessary, but with some of the subjects having been completed in a previous year. Is it necessary to achieve all of the grades at once, or would this - in conjunction with a good performance at interview and tests - be enough to get me where I want to go?
    You would need to check with a few colleges. Generally they don't like candidates taking more than the standard 2 years to do 3 A-levels. But yours is a slightly different scenario.

    Alternatively one of the "resident" Cambridge Admissions Tutors have "ask me" threads every now and again. You can ask them...

    Edit: actually, thinking about it you basically trying to bump up grades. Cambridge doesn't much like that.

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    Don't go Bruce willis on this, and decide to take your whole A levels again in 1 year.
    Just resit the nessecary papers at the nearest British council, to help push your scores up to A*s.

    Meanwhile read some professional publications and take some work experiance in your city, to boost the level of interest in your personal statement when applying.
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    (Original post by RQR)
    Hi, I'm in first year of a STEM course in Queen's University, Belfast. When originally applying to University, I was close to choosing Law, and close to applying to Cambridge to do so. I've regretted my choice not to ever since, and now would like to right that wrong. I've already applied to change my degree at my current University to Law, but I still regret not applying to Cambridge, and I'm considering drastic measures to correct this.

    Currently, I have As in Religious Studies and Psychology and a B in Physics at A-Level, as well as an A in Sociology at AS. Naturally, if I were to apply successfully to Cambridge to study Law, my A-Level portfolio would have to be improved. As I'm already older than I'd like to be when starting a degree (though I do think my maturity and understanding of the work required to succeed has improved since I took my A-Levels), my plan is to fast-track and complete 2 A-Levels in a year (I live in Northern Ireland, so this would be undertaken at Belfast Met).

    Assuming I could get A*/A or 2 A*s, as I believe I could, would this be enough to actually get a conditional offer? It would give me the grades necessary, but with some of the subjects having been completed in a previous year. Is it necessary to achieve all of the grades at once, or would this - in conjunction with a good performance at interview and tests - be enough to get me where I want to go?
    Which A levels would you be doing? If it's just resits, then Cambridge tends to not like applicants who took three years to complete their A levels (without extenuating circumstances). Taking different subjects (and ones more 'facilitating' / highly respected, e.g. History, English Lit.) may make it possible, but it's really a good idea to talk to some admissions tutors to get their opinion, particularly since your original grades were a bit lower than the Cambridge average so (to them) it doesn't look just like an issue of wrong subject choice. If you took three A levels then it would perhaps be better, something to consider?

    Have you thought about the fact that a Law degree doesn't in fact qualify you for a career in law - you'll also need to do more exams and stuff (I'm not an expert on this...) and it's pretty common for graduates from non-law courses (including those studying STEM subjects) to do a one-year Law Conversion Course instead. This could be a safer option perhaps, if you can stick out your current degree?

    Personally, I would say discuss your situation with some admissions tutors to see if they think you would have a chance applying to Cambridge. In the meantime, continue with your application to switch to Law at your current university. If you aren't able to switch to Law but the Cambridge admissions tutors reckon you've got a good shot, then dropping out and fast-tracking A levels may be an option. Alternatively, stick out your current degree course and do a Law Conversion Course afterwards

    Bear in mind that as well as relevant A levels at high grades, Cambridge admissions tutors will be looking for a demonstrated passion for your subject - so you'll also need time to get together some work experience, extra reading, etc.
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    (Original post by RQR)
    Hi, I'm in first year of a STEM course in Queen's University, Belfast. When originally applying to University, I was close to choosing Law, and close to applying to Cambridge to do so. I've regretted my choice not to ever since, and now would like to right that wrong. I've already applied to change my degree at my current University to Law, but I still regret not applying to Cambridge, and I'm considering drastic measures to correct this.

    Currently, I have As in Religious Studies and Psychology and a B in Physics at A-Level, as well as an A in Sociology at AS. Naturally, if I were to apply successfully to Cambridge to study Law, my A-Level portfolio would have to be improved. As I'm already older than I'd like to be when starting a degree (though I do think my maturity and understanding of the work required to succeed has improved since I took my A-Levels), my plan is to fast-track and complete 2 A-Levels in a year (I live in Northern Ireland, so this would be undertaken at Belfast Met).

    Assuming I could get A*/A or 2 A*s, as I believe I could, would this be enough to actually get a conditional offer? It would give me the grades necessary, but with some of the subjects having been completed in a previous year. Is it necessary to achieve all of the grades at once, or would this - in conjunction with a good performance at interview and tests - be enough to get me where I want to go?
    The thing is that RS, Psychology and Physics are perfectly acceptable A-levels for law at Cambridge. But your grades aren't.

    Go with dragonkeeper's suggestion of the Law Conversion. Or transfer to Law at QUB.

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    My plan would be to study entirely different A-Levels (something like Government & Politics and History or English Lit), would that still be seen as 'trying to bump up grades'? My main concern is this quote from the website's admissions policy;

    we would be concerned about an applicant who is retaking large numbers of exams, unless this number of retakes was justified by circumstances beyond the applicant’s control
    I know I'm not 're-taking' exams, but I'd be worried that colleges might view what I'm thinking of doing as essentially the same thing. I will take your advice and speak to an official from the University, but I'd still like to hear what you think.
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Which A levels would you be doing? If it's just resits, then Cambridge tends to not like applicants who took three years to complete their A levels (without extenuating circumstances). Taking different subjects (and ones more 'facilitating' / highly respected, e.g. History, English Lit.) may make it possible, but it's really a good idea to talk to some admissions tutors to get their opinion, particularly since your original grades were a bit lower than the Cambridge average so (to them) it doesn't look just like an issue of wrong subject choice. If you took three A levels then it would perhaps be better, something to consider?

    Have you thought about the fact that a Law degree doesn't in fact qualify you for a career in law - you'll also need to do more exams and stuff (I'm not an expert on this...) and it's pretty common for graduates from non-law courses (including those studying STEM subjects) to do a one-year Law Conversion Course instead. This could be a safer option perhaps, if you can stick out your current degree?

    Personally, I would say discuss your situation with some admissions tutors to see if they think you would have a chance applying to Cambridge. In the meantime, continue with your application to switch to Law at your current university. If you aren't able to switch to Law but the Cambridge admissions tutors reckon you've got a good shot, then dropping out and fast-tracking A levels may be an option. Alternatively, stick out your current degree course and do a Law Conversion Course afterwards

    Bear in mind that as well as relevant A levels at high grades, Cambridge admissions tutors will be looking for a demonstrated passion for your subject - so you'll also need time to get together some work experience, extra reading, etc.
    My plan was to take entirely different A-Levels, most likely Government & Politics and either History or English Lit, though I will consider taking three if that would be useful (and possible in the institution I take them with). To be honest, the subject choice wasn't the issue with my grades, the issue was that I didn't have the right work ethic or attitude. I know that if I had cared more and actually put myself to work I could have gotten the grades necessary, which is why I feel so much regret now at having not done so in the first place. But that's hardly an 'extenuating circumstance' or a good enough reason to explain the situation I find myself in to the University.

    To be honest, I'm really not finding my current degree right for me at all, so I don't think I'll be sticking with it until the end. I've already done the relevant work experience from when I was considering it in the first place, and am working my way through plenty of extra reading, so I suppose contacting an admission tutor and asking their opinion is the only step that makes sense.
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      (Original post by RQR)
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      How old are you? As the others have said, taking more than two years to do A Levels is frowned upon, especially without extenuating circumstances. However, and I may be wrong about this so I'll tag the relevant AT, you may be able to do something along the lines of what you have in mind if you're now a mature student and your old A Levels were done over the normal two-year period.

      If I were you, I'd just continue with my science degree and do a conversion course afterward. That's much easier (and less expensive) than transferring or starting over at a different university.
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      (Original post by Hydeman)
      How old are you? As the others have said, taking more than two years to do A Levels is frowned upon, especially without extenuating circumstances. However, and I may be wrong about this so I'll tag the relevant AT, you may be able to do something along the lines of what you have in mind if you're now a mature student and your old A Levels were done over the normal two-year period.

      If I were you, I'd just continue with my science degree and do a conversion course afterward. That's much easier (and less expensive) than transferring or starting over at a different university.
      I'm 18 now, having entered my current course straight from secondary school. If I did what I'm suggesting in this thread, I'd be 19 on applying and 20 upon entry into the course.
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        (Original post by RQR)
        I'm 18 now, having entered my current course straight from secondary school. If I did what I'm suggesting in this thread, I'd be 19 on applying and 20 upon entry into the course.
        Won't work in that case. You have to be 21 or older at the start of the course to be considered a mature student. Come to think of it, your current university study might also count against you...
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        (Original post by Hydeman)
        How old are you? As the others have said, taking more than two years to do A Levels is frowned upon, especially without extenuating circumstances. However, and I may be wrong about this so I'll tag the relevant AT, you may be able to do something along the lines of what you have in mind if you're now a mature student and your old A Levels were done over the normal two-year period.

        If I were you, I'd just continue with my science degree and do a conversion course afterward. That's much easier (and less expensive) than transferring or starting over at a different university.
        Lucy Cav isn't very active any more. And judging by the OP I *think* they are still well under 21.
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        (Original post by RQR)
        My plan was to take entirely different A-Levels, most likely Government & Politics and either History or English Lit, though I will consider taking three if that would be useful (and possible in the institution I take them with). To be honest, the subject choice wasn't the issue with my grades, the issue was that I didn't have the right work ethic or attitude. I know that if I had cared more and actually put myself to work I could have gotten the grades necessary, which is why I feel so much regret now at having not done so in the first place. But that's hardly an 'extenuating circumstance' or a good enough reason to explain the situation I find myself in to the University.

        To be honest, I'm really not finding my current degree right for me at all, so I don't think I'll be sticking with it until the end. I've already done the relevant work experience from when I was considering it in the first place, and am working my way through plenty of extra reading, so I suppose contacting an admission tutor and asking their opinion is the only step that makes sense.
        So transfer to Law at QUB. There's NO point taking 1 or 2 years to do a new set of A-levels with no guarantee that Cambridge will offer you anyway.

        Be pragmatic.
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          (Original post by jneill)
          Lucy Cav isn't very active any more.
          That's a shame. She was very helpful.
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          (Original post by RQR)
          My plan was to take entirely different A-Levels, most likely Government & Politics and either History or English Lit, though I will consider taking three if that would be useful (and possible in the institution I take them with). To be honest, the subject choice wasn't the issue with my grades, the issue was that I didn't have the right work ethic or attitude. I know that if I had cared more and actually put myself to work I could have gotten the grades necessary, which is why I feel so much regret now at having not done so in the first place. But that's hardly an 'extenuating circumstance' or a good enough reason to explain the situation I find myself in to the University.

          To be honest, I'm really not finding my current degree right for me at all, so I don't think I'll be sticking with it until the end. I've already done the relevant work experience from when I was considering it in the first place, and am working my way through plenty of extra reading, so I suppose contacting an admission tutor and asking their opinion is the only step that makes sense.
          Definitely talk to an admissions tutor then, and think about whether the time and costs involved are worth it compared to sticking your degree out. But if you're really not enjoying your current course, switching to Law at your current uni looks to be the best option, particularly if the admissions tutors say Cambridge is looking unlikely.

          Best of luck with everything
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          (Original post by Hydeman)
          That's a shame. She was very helpful.
          She still is - but she's now at Christ's

          LucyCav has a new AT - still finding their feet on TSR.
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          (Original post by RQR)
          Hi, I'm in first year of a STEM course in Queen's University, Belfast. When originally applying to University, I was close to choosing Law, and close to applying to Cambridge to do so. I've regretted my choice not to ever since, and now would like to right that wrong. I've already applied to change my degree at my current University to Law, but I still regret not applying to Cambridge, and I'm considering drastic measures to correct this.

          Currently, I have As in Religious Studies and Psychology and a B in Physics at A-Level, as well as an A in Sociology at AS. Naturally, if I were to apply successfully to Cambridge to study Law, my A-Level portfolio would have to be improved. As I'm already older than I'd like to be when starting a degree (though I do think my maturity and understanding of the work required to succeed has improved since I took my A-Levels), my plan is to fast-track and complete 2 A-Levels in a year (I live in Northern Ireland, so this would be undertaken at Belfast Met).

          Assuming I could get A*/A or 2 A*s, as I believe I could, would this be enough to actually get a conditional offer? It would give me the grades necessary, but with some of the subjects having been completed in a previous year. Is it necessary to achieve all of the grades at once, or would this - in conjunction with a good performance at interview and tests - be enough to get me where I want to go?
          One thing you need to ask yourself is whether you actually really need to go to Cambridge. I'm sure there are other good unis besides Cambridge.
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          (Original post by stoyfan)
          One thing you need to ask yourself is whether you actually really need to go to Cambridge. I'm sure there are other good unis besides Cambridge.
          Including QUB. Where they are already studying...
         
         
         
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