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Failing maths (Society says my life is over?) Watch

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    I'm an A or A* in all my GCSE subjects according to my pre results (including Religious Studies, Drama, Engineering and Music as my chosen subjects) but I got a D in maths and that was to the best of my ability (I still struggle multiplying two number to be honest). I don't bother studying for anything or do homework (ever in my life) apart from Maths which is the only thing I'm failing. I was probably just about a C grade before the Government had to go and make the exams harder, now I'm really in the crapper.

    Apparently I'll not be able to get a job just because I have bad genes when it comes to the maths department (both parents failed maths), I'm sorry society that I wasn't born perfect.

    If I fail Maths and A* everything else will my college still not accept me?

    EDIT: Thanks for the advice everyone ( the genes was a joke btw, I guess it came off pretty bad. Oh my god, this always happens *sighs*).
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    >because I have bad genes when it comes to the maths department (both parents failed maths)
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    Both my parents failed GCSE Maths (in fact, my father only came out with 4 GCSEs, even though he really is smart af, he just was lazy), and I managed to get a high B, so I don't think blaming genes is the way forward here. :laugh:

    I suggest speaking to your school and seeing if you can get extra help; you must be approaching it wrong somewhere.
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    Defo speak to your school about it
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    Step one: Learn your times tables.
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    Both of my parents don't have GCSE qualifications but when I done GCSE Maths, I got a B. so I don't think blaming genes is the way forward here. It doesn't matter if both of your parents failed GCSE maths, you are the one that is going to do the exam.
    You have to work hard and i'm sure that you will pas GCSE Math. I'm in year 13 and I'm still retaking GCSE English for the third time.
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    You really should get at least a C, preferably a B, but this country's massive obsession with mathematics is ridiculous so don't let it get you down.
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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    You really should get at least a C, preferably a B, but this country's massive obsession with mathematics is ridiculous so don't let it get you down.
    Its hardly ridiculous, maths and sciences are the future. Even forgetting that maths shows that you at least have some common sense and logical thinking.
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    (Original post by Dafock)
    Its hardly ridiculous, maths and sciences are the future. Even forgetting that maths shows that you at least have some common sense and logical thinking.
    No, the small subset of people who are brilliant at mathematics and programming will make a significant contribution to ''the future'', most people need only a cursory understanding of quantity and basic arithmetic.
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    (Original post by l'etranger)
    No, the small subset of people who are brilliant at mathematics and programming will make a significant contribution to ''the future'', most people need only a cursory understanding of quantity and basic arithmetic.
    From what I remember of GCSE maths, it's heavily basic applied arithmetic. Only something like the last third is relatively pure stuff.
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    Don't blame your bad grades on "bad genes". It's not how it works. Sure some people don't have a natural affinity for maths but there is nothing preventing you from improving. If you're not passing then you need to put in more effort and actually learn the content. And it'll be easier to do that once you accept that it's not your "genes" or the government's fault you're failing - it's your fault for not yet putting in the required amount of work you need to pass.
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    Yeah, the gene thing was joke btw, not serious. I already go to extra lessons everyday after school, the things is our year is the first year to take the new exams wich includes A level material. Its not the easy stuff like inverse porportion or histograms anymore, its all new stuff that the teachers are struggling to understand themselves (thats what my maths teacher said anyway. Thanks for the advice though and congratulations on your good grade!

    This was in reply to whoever said about the parents btw, accidently deleted the qoute.
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    (Original post by sinfonietta)
    Don't blame your bad grades on "bad genes". It's not how it works. Sure some people don't have a natural affinity for maths but there is nothing preventing you from improving. If you're not passing then you need to put in more effort and actually learn the content. And it'll be easier to do that once you accept that it's not your "genes" or the government's fault you're failing - it's your fault for not yet putting in the required amount of work you need to pass.
    I was joking. Anyway, I already do after school maths lessons and constant going over exam papers. But thanks for the advice.
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    (Original post by ConfusedPerson15)
    Yeah, the gene thing was joke btw, not serious. I already go to extra lessons everyday after school, the things is our year is the first year to take the new exams wich includes A level material. Its not the easy stuff like inverse porportion or histograms anymore, its all new stuff that the teachers are struggling to understand themselves (thats what my maths teacher said anyway. Thanks for the advice though and congratulations on your good grade!

    This was in reply to whoever said about the parents btw, accidently deleted the qoute.
    I sucked at maths and going to a grammar school where everyone was annoyingly obsessed with the damn subject just knocked my confidence completely. But the one thing I did was get someone (like a tutor or friend that's good at it) to simplify it and make it easy to understand and then teach it to me properly. I enjoyed it so much more too
    I ended up getting an a*
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    (Original post by Taziz99)
    Both of my parents don't have GCSE qualifications but when I done GCSE Maths, I got a B. so I don't think blaming genes is the way forward here. It doesn't matter if both of your parents failed GCSE maths, you are the one that is going to do the exam.
    You have to work hard and i'm sure that you will pas GCSE Math. I'm in year 13 and I'm still retaking GCSE English for the third time.
    just curious but why do you need to keep retaking English?
 
 
 
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