Why is the political left in disarray in the West? Watch

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astutehirstute
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The political right appears to be sweeping all before in most of the Western democracies. It is hard to find a left wing party in the ascendant.

The Republicans hold both Houses and won the Presidency in the US. We have a Tory Government here and no prospect of a Labour alternative any time soon, if ever, it sometimes seems. Merkel (a right winger) is increasingly unpopular, but losing ground to her right, not left. The French Presidential Election is going to be a battle between the right and the extreme right according to the polls. Even Australia and New Zealand have right wing governments.

So what has happened to the left? The centre left I mean (not the extreme left who never win elections). The Labour Party, the Democrats, the SPD. the Parti Socialiste?

Why are they so unpopular with their national electorates? What is to be done? Can anything be done?

In the age of identity politics, and nationalism as an expression of that, with Trump about to make America great again, Brexit meaning Brexit, and the FN allegedly about to return France to the French, and "working class" voters flocking to the flag in all those countries, is it wrong in fact to even talk in terms of left and right any more?
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astutehirstute
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
Left wing parties are on the rise in Spain, and probably a few other Southern European countries. Besides, Front National isn't really right-wing, more like nationalist socialists (not to be confused with National Socialists, but which she probably is).



Looks like the Presidential Election will be between Le Pen (Nationalist) and Fillon (far-right economically), so its 'alt-right' and traditional far-right.



Yes, its incredibly misleading. If you want to fight the 'far-right', you have to understand why it is appealing to people.

The main reason, is that it /isn't/ far-right. In most parts of Europe, the 'far-right' is actually fascist, or leaning towards fascism. Just to clarify, this is the case for most European 'far-right' parties, it does not describe UKIP, Trump, or even Germany's AfD.

That means it is **not** synonymous with "authoritarian right-wing", as many people increasingly seem to think. It is not even synonymous with "extreme racism". Fascist parties aren't particularly economically conservative, and they aren't particularly pro free-market, and they don't want smaller states.

It is important to distinguish these terms, to understand why people are drawn to fascism and nationalism, rather than thinking only extreme conservatives are drawn to the 'far-right'. It manages to appear appealing to both the working classes, and the middle classes; the uneducated and the educated. It is not just the dregs of society who it attracts; it attracts all sorts, and this is very dangerous.
You raise some interesting points, but I am still searching for an answer to the original question posed.

I don't really buy the idea that the FN is really a left wing party, for example. Doesn't France already have those, established for many decades? The Communist Party and the Socialist Party?

Why are they so unpopular? They haven't always been. Even the Communist Party used to be a force in France, and the Socialists have formed many governments.

Yet they don't seem likely to get beyond the first round of the Presidential Election.

I wonder if the left's alliance with Islamism is a big part of the problem? The French call it "lslamogauchism." It definitely really harms Labour too, amongst working class voters, and the Democrat attacks on Trump's putative Muslim ban was very unpopular in the rust belt states. Amongst blue collar democrats...

Correlation doesn't imply causation, obviously, but it is an interesting common theme, all the same.

If it is a big part of the left's unpopularity, they are screwed, surely? They can't abandon that, it is a cardinal left wing value and antagonism between Muslims and non Muslims doesn't seem to be lessening. It seems to be getting worse if anything?

But if it is not that, what is it? I would be interested to hear any theories?
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mrsweg59
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Reasons uk has tory government:
-deemed more fiscally responsible
-many people blame labour for 'benefits culture'
-blair government responsible for high levels of immigration (which many dont like)
-Ed was bad candidate

I cant speak for america or rest of europe. When it comes to brexit people voted to leave for many different reasons, the main probably being immigration fears.
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Willy Pete
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The left are too busy trying to work out who is winning in the oppression Olympics to worry about actually winning elections and helping people.
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ManiaMuse
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They've all migrated to Canada with Trudeau.
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wizardsaway
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(Original post by ManiaMuse)
They've all migrated to Canada with Trudeau.
Trudeau isn't left-wing he's centrist. The Liberals have merged with Conservatives at state and local level for example. You could view them in a similar manner to Liberal Party in Australia.
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wizardsaway
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(Original post by mrsweg59)
Reasons uk has tory government:
-deemed more fiscally responsible
-many people blame labour for 'benefits culture'
-blair government responsible for high levels of immigration (which many dont like)
-Ed was bad candidate

I cant speak for america or rest of europe. When it comes to brexit people voted to leave for many different reasons, the main probably being immigration fears.
For South Asians, the main reason is that the association between the left-wing and Muslims has become too strong. The vast majority of left-wing strongholds in South Asia are either to do with Muslims, or in regions and electoral districts where the Muslims are somehow sidelined in political debate in favour of other political issues (usually Christians). This apparent divide seems to be now appearing throughout the diaspora into second and third generations - for example the media in Australia have been more clear about how the left-wing isn't so supportive of Chinese and Indians.

Europe's main topic is nearly always "the migrants" and Islamophobia is far more readily touched on by their right-wing rather than the wimpy style adopted by the Tories. I find that the typical European is more likely to fight topics on a European platform rather than consigning themselves to their national platform, though this isn't really anything to do with right-wing nationalism.

The United States is somewhat alienated from the global political movements. I think it might be down to the sheer power of US media meaning that most Americans aren't influenced by global politics. They seem to be more concerned about national issues than global issues.
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Joleee
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as a Canadian i am telling you please don't bump old threads :flutter:
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