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    Interested in hearing from med students and doctors of all levels on whether knowing what you know now, if you'd still study medicine.

    If not, why and what else would you have done?
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    Early days, but sure – would do again without a second's thought. Nothing else is as tiring but likewise nothing else I can think of would be as rewarding or challenging in equal measure.

    Ask again in 3 years, and again in 7-8 years...
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    Probably not. I still think I'll enjoy the job once I start in the specialty I want to work in, but given that even that's not certain, I wonder whether the 7+ years it will have taken to get to that stage were worth it.

    I'd have wanted to be a graphic designer if I hadn't gone into Medicine.. or a writer if I'd been good enough to make a career out of it.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Probably not. I still think I'll enjoy the job once I start in the specialty I want to work in, but given that even that's not certain, I wonder whether the 7+ years it will have taken to get to that stage were worth it.

    I'd have wanted to be a graphic designer if I hadn't gone into Medicine.. or a writer if I'd been good enough to make a career out of it.
    And here I am an ex-Graphic Designer trying to become a medic!
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    (Original post by Marathi)
    And here I am an ex-Graphic Designer trying to become a medic!
    Haha! I did a lot of freelance (amateur) graphic work throughout med school to help pay for stuff, and it made me wish I'd gone down that path properly.. though I know it's a lot harder to make a proper living out of it than to just pick up odd freelance jobs here and there. Good luck to you with Medicine.
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    Good question. I hate it a lot of the time, but also love it and can't imagine leaving medicine. If I did it again I'd some how find the finances to have a gap year before I started. I could see myself having chosen to do engineering or conservation and enjoying it too though.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*;[url="tel:69620822")
    69620822[/url]]Probably not. I still think I'll enjoy the job once I start in the specialty I want to work in, but given that even that's not certain, I wonder whether the 7+ years it will have taken to get to that stage were worth it.

    I'd have wanted to be a graphic designer if I hadn't gone into Medicine.. or a writer if I'd been good enough to make a career out of it.
    Interesting! I'm a graduate with a previous career as a writer, funnily enough! Are you still in med school?
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    (Original post by TheRabbit)
    Good question. I hate it a lot of the time, but also love it and can't imagine leaving medicine. If I did it again I'd some how find the finances to have a gap year before I started. I could see myself having chosen to do engineering or conservation and enjoying it too though.
    This is exactly how I feel. If I were to do it all over again I would have applied as a graduate (and I appreciate how much more difficult that would have been).

    I just wish I had used the chance to explore some of my other interests before settling into medicine - specifically studying Philosophy/English Literature at university. I also feel like I would have had the opportunity to develop more as a person if I had studied another degree before applying to medicine.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Interesting! I'm a graduate with a previous career as a writer, funnily enough! Are you still in med school?
    Out of interest, how did you get into the career of writing? Is it quite a difficult career to maintain?
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    (Original post by Angury)
    This is exactly how I feel. If I were to do it all over again I would have applied as a graduate (and I appreciate how much more difficult that would have been).

    I just wish I had used the chance to explore some of my other interests before settling into medicine - specifically studying Philosophy/English Literature at university. I also feel like I would have had the opportunity to develop more as a person if I had studied another degree before applying to medicine.



    Out of interest, how did you get into the career of writing? Is it quite a difficult career to maintain?
    I can appreciate that - but there must be pros for going straight in from A levels too?

    I qualified as a journalist and worked in newspapers and magazines and it is a NIGHTMARE jobs-wise. Too many graduates for too few jobs - and the few that are about pay very little (my local paper offered me £13K for a 40hr week)

    I love writing but want to do it on the side - really that's what most people seem to do as it doesn't tend to pay enough as FT gig. With a medical degree and if you can write, there are publications out there who would pay you for copy. Magazines and newspapers like to have a 'resident Dr' to blog on their websites - even local news!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can appreciate that - but there must be pros for going straight in from A levels too?

    I qualified as a journalist and worked in newspapers and magazines and it is a NIGHTMARE jobs-wise. Too many graduates for too few jobs - and the few that are about pay very little (my local paper offered me £13K for a 40hr week)

    I love writing but want to do it on the side - really that's what most people seem to do as it doesn't tend to pay enough as FT gig. With a medical degree and if you can write, there are publications out there who would pay you for copy. Magazines and newspapers like to have a 'resident Dr' to blog on their websites - even local news!
    Oh absolutely, don't get me wrong - I appreciate that I am very lucky to have managed to get into medicine straight from school, and am pretty much guaranteed a job. It is a privileged position to be in.

    I do however think, as with most things, there are pros to taking a gap year in between school and university or something similar. I feel that people sometimes believe their only option is to go straight into university or a career path straight after school, even if they have no idea what to do, rather than take a moment and think about what they enjoy and experience the world a bit more. I don't think it is necessarily a rush to get into a job, and I think this is the one thing I wish I had taken into account when I was doing my A Levels. At the time, my mindset was very much 'pass A Levels -> get into medical school -> graduate -> work -> live happily ever after.'

    Doing writing as a hobby is something that has been on my mind as well, and I agree that it is probably more feasible to do it on the side rather than as a career in itself. I've had a look around, and there are a fair few opportunities for writers working in healthcare. Books about healthcare in general also seem to be quite topical as well, so it is an area to look into.
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    There are times when I wish I had done medicine at 18, or before kids or if I had pursued a high earning career before starting so I had more options for GEM. I would still want to do medicine though. It suits me. I am just broke and knackered which is the bit I would want to change!
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    (Original post by Angury)
    Oh absolutely, don't get me wrong - I appreciate that I am very lucky to have managed to get into medicine straight from school, and am pretty much guaranteed a job. It is a privileged position to be in.

    I do however think, as with most things, there are pros to taking a gap year in between school and university or something similar. I feel that people sometimes believe their only option is to go straight into university or a career path straight after school, even if they have no idea what to do, rather than take a moment and think about what they enjoy and experience the world a bit more. I don't think it is necessarily a rush to get into a job, and I think this is the one thing I had appreciated when I was doing my A Levels. At the time, my mindset was very much 'pass A Levels -> get into medical school -> graduate -> work as a doctor -> happily ever after.'

    Doing writing as a hobby is something that has been on my mind as well, and I agree that it is probably more feasible. I've had a look around, and there are a fair few opportunities for writers working in healthcare. Books about healthcare in general also seem to be quite topical as well, so it is an area to look into.
    Yeah I can totally understand that - I suppose if you go straight from school there's no let up academically speaking. I've been told that after completing F2 is a good time to travel/take a year out/have kids - is this true?

    It certainly is - a medical degree carries such authority with it too. I wouldn't imagine you'd have a problem getting some paid freelance stuff tbh

    (Original post by Quilverine)
    There are times when I wish I had done medicine at 18, or before kids or if I had pursued a high earning career before starting so I had more options for GEM. I would still want to do medicine though. It suits me. I am just broke and knackered which is the bit I would want to change!
    Nice to hear from a fellow grad! Yeah my previous career was rather low paid - and I'll be working on the bank when I can to support myself -_- but needs must right?
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    If I did start over I might have studied something like Law, International Relations, Languages, Anthropology/Sociology etc. however it took the maturity of having gone through university education for myself to discover that I really had a passion for those subjects as well as a passion for health.

    Although I think whichever road I would have taken, whichever subject, I actually probably would still come to the end destination of wanting to work in the field of global health/social justice.
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    I'd do it again but would have caned the USMLE while at medical school and suffered through residency in the US while still in my early 20s. Training in the NHS is long and often demoralising. The happiest doctors in the UK are those with mixed careers (e.g. clinical academics) and those who aren't worried about stepping away from training when it's getting them down.
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    I think so? I hate how the degree is stopping me from pursuing my hobby (can't compete in sports im passionate about due to long uni/hospital hours leading to me skipping training), but the other day when my supervisor told me my dissertation may be used as a backbone for further reasearch I cried tears of joy. I can't think of anything else that makes me cry out of happiness.
    (Original post by Angury)
    I just wish I had used the chance to explore some of my other interests before settling into medicine - specifically studying Philosophy/English Literature at university. I also feel like I would have had the opportunity to develop more as a person if I had studied another degree before applying to medicine.
    You can still study that degree if you wish, I know a guy who graduated med school and works as a magician, it is never too late to do what you enjoy
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    It depends. I don't regret studying medicine and being a GP but if I had my time again it seems a waste to do exactly the same stuff so no I'd do something different. Plus the world now and my knowledge of opportunities available are completely different to the way i viewed the world as an 18 year old in 1982.
    I still think being a GP is a good life. No nights or weekends (unless you want them) good pay, an interesting job (I diagnosed dermatomyositis last week, spotting rarities still gives me a kick) work colleagues I like, as a partner in the business I have some control over things, the ability to work part time so this morning I finished making marmalade and cycled 55km before starting work at 1.30.
    I'd maybe go for Nat Sci or engineering now though, or play a brass instrument as orchestras never have enough brass players ? French Horn; or take a completely different tack and do Arabic with international relations like a friend of mine's daughter did. That sounded fun.
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    If I did start over I might have studied something like Law, International Relations, Languages, Anthropology/Sociology etc. however it took the maturity of having gone through university education for myself to discover that I really had a passion for those subjects as well as a passion for health.

    Although I think whichever road I would have taken, whichever subject, I actually probably would still come to the end destination of wanting to work in the field of global health/social justice.
    I feel exactly the same (I'm a final year medic). However, I think I would've entered those subjects wanting to help society and would soon acknowledge that barrier that $$ poses to what I wanted to achieve legally/politically. Thus, would've been a medic anyway, but without a scientific undergrad. Planning to take a year out after fy2 to do a masters in something like that anyway.
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    I probably would do it again for the following reasons:

    1) Uni was fun, so 6 years of uni = double fun. Being a PhD student, which is probably where i would have ended up if not in medicine, does not seem as much fun as clinical school. Not by a long shot.
    2) Whilst we like to ***** about how understaffed we are as doctors (which is definitely true)... I've never had to search for a job in my life. The reverse in fact - I'm e-mailed daily from people practically begging me to do shifts. Having to search for jobs, go to loads of job interviews, having to settle for something you don't really want because you lack financial security... is frankly not something doctors experience.
    3) Linking to the above... I can just take years out and they'll just welcome me back. Other careers don't really allow that.
    4) I can move north - nearer to the mountains, and where i can buy like a 4 bed house if i want even on current earnings - and not have to worry about where my job is going to come from.
    5) Relatively easy to just leave the country. Probably my long term plan
    6) Can work for MSF without too much trouble.

    Loads of downsides too, not least that the government and higher-ups just couldn't care less about you, the horrible training structure, and the fact that they make you move around the country for no reason. But overall probably would do it again.

    (Original post by Nottie)
    You can still study that degree if you wish, I know a guy who graduated med school and works as a magician, it is never too late to do what you enjoy
    I also know a consultant cardiologist who works children's parties as a magician in his spare time.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Interesting! I'm a graduate with a previous career as a writer, funnily enough! Are you still in med school?
    Oh, that's cool.

    And no, I'm a doctor now!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I probably would do it again for the following reasons:

    1) Uni was fun, so 6 years of uni = double fun. Being a PhD student, which is probably where i would have ended up if not in medicine, does not seem as much fun as clinical school. Not by a long shot.
    2) Whilst we like to ***** about how understaffed we are as doctors (which is definitely true)... I've never had to search for a job in my life. The reverse in fact - I'm e-mailed daily from people practically begging me to do shifts. Having to search for jobs, go to loads of job interviews, having to settle for something you don't really want because you lack financial security... is frankly not something doctors experience.
    3) Linking to the above... I can just take years out and they'll just welcome me back. Other careers don't really allow that.
    4) I can move north - nearer to the mountains, and where i can buy like a 4 bed house if i want even on current earnings - and not have to worry about where my job is going to come from.
    5) Relatively easy to just leave the country. Probably my long term plan
    6) Can work for MSF without too much trouble.

    Loads of downsides too, not least that the government and higher-ups just couldn't care less about you, the horrible training structure, and the fact that they make you move around the country for no reason. But overall probably would do it again.



    I also know a consultant cardiologist who works children's parties as a magician in his spare time.
    Surely point 2 shows the understaffing? As in there aren't enough people in jobs.
 
 
 
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