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propanol bonding Watch

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    how can I explain the covalent bonding in a porpanol molecule? would i say it consists of 3 carbon atoms covalently bonded to 7 hydrogens and 1 oxygen atom? Is it possible to show this in a dot and cross diagram? My teacher says that it is a covalent compound therefor it has no free electrons and therefore connot conduct electricity. (+ 1 H bound to O)
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    The formula is C3H6O3, i.e. there aren't 7 hydrogens.

    The central C has a double bond to O.
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    Oh right, well iv just been doing some research online and a few different sources kept coming up with C3H8O
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    Basically i have to write about the electrical conductivity of sodium chloride and compare it with propanol. Obviously propanol wont conduct because it is a covalent compound and has no free electrons but why doent it have free electrons? I need to explain its properties. Is it a simple covalent or giant covalent structure?
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    (Original post by rdodd13251)
    Basically i have to write about the electrical conductivity of sodium chloride and compare it with propanol. Obviously propanol wont conduct because it is a covalent compound and has no free electrons but why doent it have free electrons? I need to explain its properties. Is it a simple covalent or giant covalent structure?
    you're right about the formula, Pigster must have misread what you wrote as propanone, probably because "propanol" doesnt refer to a specific compound (you could have propan-1-ol or propan-2-ol)

    it has a simple covalent structure, a simple google search will give you the structure of both isomers.

    In virtually all stable covalent species all the valence electrons are paired up in bonds, this is true in propanol. it is also true that simple covalent structures are not conductive, electron "hopping" from one molecule to the next is far too difficult for stable electrons involved in covalent bonds.
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    (Original post by MexicanKeith)
    you're right about the formula, Pigster must have misread what you wrote as propanone, probably because "propanol" doesnt refer to a specific compound (you could have propan-1-ol or propan-2-ol)

    it has a simple covalent structure, a simple google search will give you the structure of both isomers.

    In virtually all stable covalent species all the valence electrons are paired up in bonds, this is true in propanol. it is also true that simple covalent structures are not conductive, electron "hopping" from one molecule to the next is far too difficult for stable electrons involved in covalent bonds.
    Ah thank you for clearing up those issues, you've been very helpful. Is it possible to draw a dot cross diagram for porpanol?
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    (Original post by rdodd13251)
    Ah thank you for clearing up those issues, you've been very helpful. Is it possible to draw a dot cross diagram for porpanol?
    it certainly is! Have a go if you like, should be relatively easy if you just look at the structure drawn out, try looking up the structure of propan-1-ol then doing the dot and cross diagram, remember hydrogen should have 2 electrons, carbon and oxygen should have 8 in their outer shell, every bond represents 2 electrons and oxygen has 2 lone pairs in this molecule!
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    (Original post by MexicanKeith)
    it certainly is! Have a go if you like, should be relatively easy if you just look at the structure drawn out, try looking up the structure of propan-1-ol then doing the dot and cross diagram, remember hydrogen should have 2 electrons, carbon and oxygen should have 8 in their outer shell, every bond represents 2 electrons and oxygen has 2 lone pairs in this molecule!
    Great thank you so much ur ace lol
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    Senior moment.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    Senior moment.
    Thank you for trying to help me though
 
 
 
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