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    Dear everyone!

    So, I'd like to apply for the US for my masters and need some general help for how to applications.

    I'm in my second year of university and would like to apply for some of the Ivies and UCs. As a general gist, do I apply when I'm in my third year, or do I have to complete the whole degree first and take a year out to apply?

    (Grades, 9A*s and 3As in GCSE, A*AAAa A Levels, 2.1 first year of university).

    I study at Warwick and know of so many people that are at the Ivies doing their masters there right now as well as meeting masters students here who have come from the strong US Universities. However, it's just a bit awkward to ask them.

    I can't really find where it says whether or not they give offers when you're in your 3rd year. Would it be like A Levels? That your offer is based on a prediction grade? Or would I have to complete my degree before I even bother to apply? I know it's slightly different for every uni but there must be a trend they all follow?

    I'm planning on taking the GRE the month before my last year of university starts (September 2017).

    Thanks for reading, hope to get some help!
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    You need to apply for your Masters a year before your MA programs starts. At the same time, you need to have obtained your Bachelors degree before you can start your masters program. Usually, they'll have you state what courses are in progress and what courses you plan to take in your final semester of your undergraduate program. If you get accepted, then the university will ask you to send in your transcripts after you complete your undergraduate studies. (I can't answer questions about your UK grades as I'm not familiar with the system and how it equates to the US system).

    You should take the GRE around a year before you want to start your Masters, so for example, if you are planning to start your masters in Fall 2018, you should start taking the GRE now. One month before is not enough time. If your undergraduate degree only takes 3 years and you are currently in your second year, wait until you begin your third year to take the GRE. That way if you are not satisfied with your score, you can retake it, again. (However, if you want to take the GRE now so you have more time to study before you take it a second time, that's not a bad idea, either).

    The other thing is the GRE is available to take in two ways: by computer or on paper. Depending on what options are available to you at the site where you plan to take the test, you may only have certain months when it can be taken. Check the GRE website first for the dates at your location. You also want to check each uni's application timeline to see when your application and GRE scores are due.

    As far as other graduate info for international students, you can look up the graduate programs at the universities you are interested in for more specific details. You can also locate the department of your field of study on the uni's website and contact an advisor. If you've done both (searched the uni's website and contacted an advisor) and you are still confused, you can send me a message, and I'll try my best to help you.
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    It should be noted that many elite universities in the US don't offer terminal master's degrees. Unlike the UK, which has a comparative obsession with master's programs, it is typical in the US to go straight from undergrad to a PhD program. Often those who go the master's route are those rejected from PhD programs, who need to beef up their CVs before applying to PhD programs, and/or who aren't sure about academia and don't want to commit to a PhD program.

    It's particularly rare (read: almost impossible) to find funded master's programs at good private universities. In fact, many elite universities charge tuition for their MA programs in order to partially subsidize their PhD students, who receive the lion's share of departmental funding and advising. Public universities are more likely to have funding for master's students, but it is FAR from guaranteed, particularly at the best public universities (e.g. Berkeley, UNC, Michigan).

    You should think about why you need a graduate degree -- or even whether you do. Graduate admissions in the US is highly dependent on fit, so you are expected to be able to explain:
    • Why you are applying to that university/department in particular
    • Why are you are interested in pursuing a graduate degree
    • What your career goals are and how graduate education at that department will help you reach them
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    (Original post by devil09)
    It should be noted that many elite universities in the US don't offer terminal master's degrees. Unlike the UK, which has a comparative obsession with master's programs, it is typical in the US to go straight from undergrad to a PhD program. Often those who go the master's route are those rejected from PhD programs, who need to beef up their CVs before applying to PhD programs, and/or who aren't sure about academia and don't want to commit to a PhD program.
    You've got this the complete opposite way around, the UK is known for being the one place in the world where you can do a PhD straight after your bachelor's. They literally fought for the Bologna process to be bachelor's +master's/doctorate instead of the bachelor's + master's + doctorate that was considered to be the international standard set by the US. The UK has an obsession with master's programs because Europe has an obsession with master's programs because that's the standard of education required for a lot of careers in Europe.

    I know quite a few people at my uni in the UK who applied to do PhDs after having done a research placement but they just couldn't compete with people who had done a master's too. Equally I know a few people who went straight from bachelor's to PhD, whereas in the US or anywhere else you need the master's in between (with a couple of exceptions where unis in some countries will accept people with UK Bachelor's degrees).

    There's plenty of funding for master's degrees in the US, less so than bachelor's or doctorates, but still fairly widely available.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Equally I know a few people who went straight from bachelor's to PhD, whereas in the US or anywhere else you need the master's in between (with a couple of exceptions where unis in some countries will accept people with UK Bachelor's degrees).
    It is very common in the US to go straight from a BA/BS to a PhD program, and this route is the norm for STEM in particular. However, after a student is admitted to a PhD program, it is not unusual to earn a master's degree along the way to a PhD. This is basically a consolation prize for students who drop out of their PhD programs.

    Funding is highly variable from one place to another for master's students and will depend on the level of the school (non-flagship publics have the most funding for MA/MS students) and academic discipline.

    (Source: I'm a PhD student at a major US university.)

    the UK is known for being the one place in the world where you can do a PhD straight after your bachelor's. They literally fought for the Bologna process to be bachelor's +master's/doctorate...I know quite a few people at my uni in the UK who applied to do PhDs after having done a research placement but they just couldn't compete with people who had done a master's too.
    Yeah, I'll have to admit I'm not an expert on graduate admissions in the UK. There's quite a few people in my cohort from abroad who've done master's degrees at Oxford, UCL, and the like, so perhaps that is coloring my view.
 
 
 
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