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Farmer shoots two huskies, one of them dies Watch

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    (Original post by Mancini)
    Since you own huskies would you put this down to instinctive behaviour or poor training?
    Not sure, she could sit but that's about it. So probably bad training. We couldn't even get her to stop jumping up at people. We tried to train her, but maybe it was our fault for being rubbish at it. The thing is she knew how to kill a sheep on her first try, so there must be some instinctive element, and every time we took her for a walk she would go and explore far and wide. She even killed a rabbit once while on the lead.

    The funniest thing is that she got terrified of this tiny dog once, some stupid little terrier. She ran all the way home just from seeing it. (very surprised at her ability to navigate, have lost a few dogs and they all seem to be able to work out where home is)

    My theory is that any dog whose ears are still pointy is essentially just a small wolf and has very strong senses and instincts and will be hard to train. We owned terriers after her and they're sort of the same, but smaller and therefore easier to manage.
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    I'm glad that most people defend the farmer, I'd have expected that most would be all like "NOOO CUTE HUSKIES BEING KILLED BY BLOODTHIRSTY FARMER".
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    (Original post by Mistletoe)
    Not sure, she could sit but that's about it. So probably bad training. We couldn't even get her to stop jumping up at people. We tried to train her, but maybe it was our fault for being rubbish at it. The thing is she knew how to kill a sheep on her first try, so there must be some instinctive element, and every time we took her for a walk she would go and explore far and wide. She even killed a rabbit once while on the lead.

    The funniest thing is that she got terrified of this tiny dog once, some stupid little terrier. She ran all the way home just from seeing it. (very surprised at her ability to navigate, have lost a few dogs and they all seem to be able to work out where home is)

    My theory is that any dog whose ears are still pointy is essentially just a small wolf and has very strong senses and instincts and will be hard to train. We owned terriers after her and they're sort of the same, but smaller and therefore easier to manage.
    I think huskies are the type of dog you keep close to you unless you are confident in your training of dogs. Adverts always mention you need to be a confident and experienced with large dogs.

    I see so many adverts of people selling huskies after realising they can't handle them.

    On another note I remember being in a park and two large hunting type dogs running around me, they had floppy ears not sure of the breed. They could have easily attacked me and almost run to me as I'm just standing still nervous. Thankfully the owner whistled or called them off.

    Guess with dogs it's a bit of instinct and training but in today's society owners should be responsible, not everyone is used to or likes dogs running up to them.
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    (Original post by Mancini)
    I think huskies are the type of dog you keep close to you unless you are confident in your training of dogs. Adverts always mention you need to be a confident and experienced with large dogs.

    I see so many adverts of people selling huskies after realising they can't handle them.

    On another note I remember being in a park and two large hunting type dogs running around me, they had floppy ears not sure how to describe them. They could have easily atracked me and almost run to me as I'm just standing still nervous. Thankfully the owner whistled or called them off.

    Guess with dogs it's a bit of instinct and training but in today's society owners should be responsible, not everyone is used to or likes dogs running up to them.
    I know huskies pretty well and tbh it is very well known that they do not respond well to commands. If you don't have a leash on them in public, they'll flee and you'll never see them again. Their instinct is like that, they're not super obedient like German Shepherds or Retrievers, etc. They're very independent and that's why they make terrible guard dogs (they love everyone including thieves)
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    (Original post by econwarwicker)
    Rather pathetic and hypocritical that people thought this was fine when you're going to eat those lambs anyway.
    This isn't about whether the lambs would be killed anyway, it is the fact that the farmer is losing money by not being able to sell his stock if it has been killed.
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    The law is crystal clear on this. A landowner is well within their rights to shoot any dog posing a threat to livestock. So let this incident be a reminder to keep your dogs under control in the countryside.

    I worked on a sheep and cattle farm for a few years, which had several public footpaths through it. Most dog walkers were fine and responsible, but you did get the odd few (almost always urban types) who seemed to treat the place as a park rather than a working farm and would let their dogs roam all over the place, despite numerous signs telling people to keep their dogs on a lead. And we did once come close to shooting a dog. This utterly moronic couple thought it was just hilarious to let their dog chase our sheep around the field. They were just standing there laughing at this, right up until me and another worker walked up to them with loaded shotguns and quite bluntly said, "get that dog on a lead now or we will shoot it". They did so promptly, but not without getting all huffy about it, as though it was a totally unreasonable request to not allow their dog to traumatise our sheep. We later found out one of the sheep had badly broken it's leg during this event, and she died a week later.
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    (Original post by Wōden)
    The law is crystal clear on this. A landowner is well within their rights to shoot any dog posing a threat to livestock. So let this incident be a reminder to keep your dogs under control in the countryside.

    I worked on a sheep and cattle farm for a few years, which had several public footpaths through it. Most dog walkers were fine and responsible, but you did get the odd few (almost always urban types) who seemed to treat the place as a park rather than a working farm and would let their dogs roam all over the place, despite numerous signs telling people to keep their dogs on a lead. And we did once come close to shooting a dog. This utterly moronic couple thought it was just hilarious to let their dog chase our sheep around the field. They were just standing there laughing at this, right up until me and another worker walked up to them with loaded shotguns and quite bluntly said, "get that dog on a lead now or we will shoot it". They did so promptly, but not without getting all huffy about it, as though it was a totally unreasonable request to not allow their dog to traumatise our sheep. We later found out one of the sheep had badly broken it's leg during this event, and she died a week later.
    Tbh that's exactly what they should be doing, and there should be rams to protect them. But I guess humans need their meat and wool :rolleyes: the sooner we learn to accomodate the needs of wild animals and end domestication the better, imo
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    (Original post by RainbowMan)
    I know huskies pretty well and tbh it is very well known that they do not respond well to commands. If you don't have a leash on them in public, they'll flee and you'll never see them again. Their instinct is like that, they're not super obedient like German Shepherds or Retrievers, etc. They're very independent and that's why they make terrible guard dogs (they love everyone including thieves)
    The only huskies I see in my area are always on leashes. If it is true that they flee I think I might reconsider getting one in future doesn't sound very obedient.
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    I can't understand why she didn't have them on a lead near a field if they are prone to running wild.
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    (Original post by Mancini)
    The only huskies I see in my area are always on leashes. If it is true that they flee I think I might reconsider getting one in future doesn't sound very obedient.
    They aren't - at all. That's the main reason they're not recommended to rookie owners. They're very difficult to train.

    EDIT: I should say I'm a bit spoiled in this regard because I have an extremely intelligent, annoyingly obedient German Shepherd. Huskies look to me like anarchist renegades.
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    (Original post by Mancini)
    Since you own huskies would you put this down to instinctive behaviour or poor training?

    I must add I side with the farmer, it's down to dog owners to control their dogs.
    It is instinctive behaviour by the dog. I have three whippets - if they see a rabbit/cat they are off after them and there's nothing you can do. One of them even went for a deer once, and have been after cows. It is incredibly difficult to train them out of this instinct, and I wouldn't trust them even if I thought they were trained not to attack.
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    a 'warning shot' is not required

    If uncontrolled dogs are worrying livestock you shoot to kill simple as.

    and it is entirely legal

    take home message for the whinging townie ***** - keep your pets on a lead around livestock .
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    (Original post by Mistletoe)
    Tbh that's exactly what they should be doing, and there should be rams to protect them. But I guess humans need their meat and wool :rolleyes: the sooner we learn to accomodate the needs of wild animals and end domestication the better, imo
    or arrogant idiots learn that their pleasant ewalk in the country is trampling their way through the farmers 'office'
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    (Original post by Wōden)
    The law is crystal clear on this. A landowner is well within their rights to shoot any dog posing a threat to livestock. So let this incident be a reminder to keep your dogs under control in the countryside.

    I worked on a sheep and cattle farm for a few years, which had several public footpaths through it. Most dog walkers were fine and responsible, but you did get the odd few (almost always urban types) who seemed to treat the place as a park rather than a working farm and would let their dogs roam all over the place, despite numerous signs telling people to keep their dogs on a lead. And we did once come close to shooting a dog. This utterly moronic couple thought it was just hilarious to let their dog chase our sheep around the field. They were just standing there laughing at this, right up until me and another worker walked up to them with loaded shotguns and quite bluntly said, "get that dog on a lead now or we will shoot it". They did so promptly, but not without getting all huffy about it, as though it was a totally unreasonable request to not allow their dog to traumatise our sheep. We later found out one of the sheep had badly broken it's leg during this event, and she died a week later.
    Some people do think countryside is a park. There used to be short public information films on telly telling people how to behave



    The moral of this one was clearly that people in the country get cross with townies for no discernable reason.

    Apparently one dog per week is shot for worrying livestock and tbh I think that's surprisingly low... I guess most farmers would do as you did and rather get the owners to control the dog than shoot it... but that doesn't mean they couldn't legally shoot the dog without firing 'warning shots' or any other preliminaries.
    In this case it seems the dog owner wasn't in sight anyway reducing the farmers options for getting the dogs to stop attacking his sheep.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    or arrogant idiots learn that their pleasant ewalk in the country is trampling their way through the farmers 'office'
    dogs need quality of life too and dogs hate leads
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Surprised it took this long for somebody to have a problem, and not really, the shooting is protection of property, what's later done with that property is largely irrelevant to the right to protect it.

    If you're demolishing your house in 6 months does that make it alright for somebody to demolish it now?

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    The assumption being that you were 100% certain the dogs will kill the lamb. Don't try and bait me with an inaccurate metaphor.
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    (Original post by Mistletoe)
    dogs need quality of life too and dogs hate leads


    letting a dog off a lead in a farmer;s field is aggravted trespass and thefarmer is perfectly within his /her rights to protect his/her business to shoot the useless mouth .
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    Despite my intense love for the animals, the farmer was justified. I can't stand people who let their dogs off the lead if they know that theres a chance it won't come when called. The amount of times a massive lab has come bounding up to my dog when she's on the lead is ridiculous, and the owners wonder why my dog growls and gets protective.
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    (Original post by econwarwicker)
    The assumption being that you were 100% certain the dogs will kill the lamb. Don't try and bait me with an inaccurate metaphor.
    uncontrolled dogs near livestock can and will be shot.

    The law supports this action to protect the stock and the farmer's business from the arrogance and idiocy of stupid townies who treat farmland as a park .
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    letting a dog off a lead in a farmer;s field is aggravted trespass and thefarmer is perfectly within his /her rights to protect his/her business to shoot the useless mouth .
    I didn't say otherwise, I was just explaining the source of the problem.
 
 
 
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