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    Hi, so I am in Year 11 at school and I really want to study Medicine at University. I am predicted straight As and A*s and did really well in my mocks (4 A*s, 2 As and a B). However, I am conscious of how difficult it is to get into a Medcine course.
    I was wondering if you help me with things I should be doing now or in the near future to give myself the best hance of getting into a Medcine course?
    Thanks! x
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    Definitely concentrate on GCSE for now - need to be solidly around 7 A*s or above for medicine tbh as everyone else is. Read around the subject, make sure it is a subject that you want to do.
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    (Original post by Jakir)
    Definitely concentrate on GCSE for now - need to be solidly around 7 A*s or above for medicine tbh as everyone else is. Read around the subject, make sure it is a subject that you want to do.
    Thanks for the advice. I have done quite a lot of looking into it and I have wanted to do it for a while now. Although my school is predicitng a mixture of As and A*s, I believe I can do the straight A*s. However, after GCSEs what should I start doing eg volunteering?
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Thanks for the advice. Although my school is predicitng a mixture of As and A*s, I believe u can do the straight A*s. However, after GCSEs what should I start doing eg volunteering?
    Definitely do volunteering in charity shops, hospice or care home long term. You may also do some work experience at a hospital or gp. But it is more so about what you learn from the experience rather than what you do
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    (Original post by Jakir)
    Definitely do volunteering in charity shops, hospice or care home long term. You may also do some work experience at a hospital or gp. But it is more so about what you learn from the experience rather than what you do
    Okay so volunteering is a must. What did you take at A-level? Thanks!
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Okay so volunteering is a must. What did you take at A-level? Thanks!
    Chem, Bio, Physics, Maths and Further Maths
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    (Original post by Jakir)
    Chem, Bio, Physics, Maths and Further Maths
    Most Sixth Forms now only let you take 3 A-Levels, so considering this I am going to take Chem, Bio and Maths. However, I could take Further Maths as an additional 4th. Would I be better off taking further aswell? Also what Uni do you got to? Thanks
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Most Sixth Forms now only let you take 3 A-Levels, so considering this I am going to take Chem, Bio and Maths. However, I could take Further Maths as an additional 4th. Would I be better off taking further aswell? Also what Uni do you got to? Thanks
    There is no point in taking FM - most medical schools don't count it as an additional subject.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    There is no point in taking FM - most medical schools don't count it as an additional subject.
    Oh okay. Thanks!
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    Firstly, don't bother doing further maths. Complete waste of your time for the vast majority (if not all) medical schools.
    Next, get loads of work experience! In your long summer following your GCSEs, try and get work experience at a school (special needs children esp good), a nursing home, a hospice, a GP surgery (even if you can only get a couple of afternoons) and ideally a hospital. This will be the best opportunity you have to get work experience as once you start your A levels, your spare time will be extremely limited.
    I would also say make sure you have 1 long term volunteering commitment (involving caring for others, doesn't need to directly in a hospital/GP). For example for me this is 2 hours a week volunteering at a hospice. Do your best to keep this up through your A levels as this shows commitment to medicine as well as giving you loads to talk about when you hopefully get interviews in year 13.
    Finally, keep yourself well. It's very easy to taken into the whole "I must achieve 269 A* GCSEs and 72 A* A levels in every subject know to man" mindset, but the bottom line is, for most medical schools (excluding Birmingham and a few others) you just need an A grade average at GCSE with a handful of A*s, then AAA or A*AA at A level. You literally don't need endless amount of A levels. After this point, it comes down to UKCAT/BMAT and then interview performance.
    P.S. I did Chemistry and Biology at A level so you're welcome to message me if you need any advice.
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    (Original post by jemmaaa0853)
    Firstly, don't bother doing further maths. Complete waste of your time for the vast majority (if not all) medical schools.
    Next, get loads of work experience! In your long summer following your GCSEs, try and get work experience at a school (special needs children esp good), a nursing home, a hospice, a GP surgery (even if you can only get a couple of afternoons) and ideally a hospital. This will be the best opportunity you have to get work experience as once you start your A levels, your spare time will be extremely limited.
    I would also say make sure you have 1 long term volunteering commitment (involving caring for others, doesn't need to directly in a hospital/GP). For example for me this is 2 hours a week volunteering at a hospice. Do your best to keep this up through your A levels as this shows commitment to medicine as well as giving you loads to talk about when you hopefully get interviews in year 13.
    Finally, keep yourself well. It's very easy to taken into the whole "I must achieve 269 A* GCSEs and 72 A* A levels in every subject know to man" mindset, but the bottom line is, for most medical schools (excluding Birmingham and a few others) you just need an A grade average at GCSE with a handful of A*s, then AAA or A*AA at A level. You literally don't need endless amount of A levels. After this point, it comes down to UKCAT/BMAT and then interview performance.
    P.S. I did Chemistry and Biology at A level so you're welcome to message me if you need any advice.
    Hi, thanks so much for the advise! I definetley now going to do the volunteering. What was the 3rd A-level you took. I was just wondering what Uni you are at / went too and what you achieved in your GCSE's? Thanks again
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Hi, thanks so much for the advise! I definetley now going to do the volunteering. What was the 3rd A-level you took. I was just wondering what Uni you are at / went too and what you achieved in your GCSE's? Thanks again
    You're welcome.
    My 3rd A level was Psychology (definitely my favourite and the easiest out of the 3)
    In my GCSEs I got 10 A*s and 1 A.
    I'm on a gap year at the minute and have applied for medicine. I have been given 3 interviews so far at Sheffield, Leicester and Southampton and am still waiting to hear back from Birmingham.
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    (Original post by jemmaaa0853)
    You're welcome.
    My 3rd A level was Psychology (definitely my favourite and the easiest out of the 3)
    In my GCSEs I got 10 A*s and 1 A.
    I'm on a gap year at the minute and have applied for medicine. I have been given 3 interviews so far at Sheffield, Leicester and Southampton and am still waiting to hear back from Birmingham.
    What did you get in your GCSE's?
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    What did you get in your GCSE's?
    I put this in my previous answer haha but I got 10 A*s and 1 A
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    (Original post by jemmaaa0853)
    I put this in my previous answer haha but I got 10 A*s and 1 A
    Oh sorry! Thanks for answeing again though!
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    Everything you ever needed to know about 'Applying for Medicine' here :

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Oh sorry! Thanks for answeing again though!
    That's fine, don't worry about it
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    (Original post by Stewart3021)
    Hi, so I am in Year 11 at school and I really want to study Medicine at University. I am predicted straight As and A*s and did really well in my mocks (4 A*s, 2 As and a B).
    The most important thing at your age is to grow as a person, and to try things.
    Its better for you to get enjoyment through the playing of sport, music and following your own hobbies but only if they are interesting to you (Not computer games).

    Set aside a regular time for homework/study and stick to it by picking a regular quiet time in the week - Early Sunday is a good time

    Other advice depends on your school and how they teach really - I'm assuming it's a normal state school? if so, then it's more difficult (not impossible) to get the grades you need for medicine. Just be mindful that this won't be because of your obvious ability, it will be more because the school may not have the resources to give you (the elite ofyour school) the sustained focus you need on your journey to get the required grades and experiences.
    On average, Private, Public and Grammar schools are far better than state in this regard.
    To mitigate a poor state school (if it is), you may have to spend time at home with extra self study, but this is easily done if you just buy the subject books from WHSm*th and keep track of them when compared to your school notes.

    But all this extra self study is secondary to you enjoying your youth. Also, the desire to work and gain excellent A* grades has to come from within you - even if you hate the subject.
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    Come tô Bolivia. No interview. No exames. And cost only $250 monthly.
 
 
 
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