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    okay so i am thinking about insurance choices rn because i am getting more and more worried about uni. I already applied to chichester psychology msci and they offered BBC. I am still waiting for sussex for psych with foundation year but i am having second thoughts about it. Should i go for the foundation year and end up at a better uni but pay an extra £9000 or go to chichester, and get a masters rather than a bsc all covered by the student loans company??
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    I'd be a bit concerned about why one uni is offering a foundation year and the other isn't. What grades are you realistically likely to achieve. If you can meet the MSci requirement then I'd go for that.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    I'd be a bit concerned about why one uni is offering a foundation year and the other isn't. What grades are you realistically likely to achieve. If you can meet the MSci requirement then I'd go for that.
    well sussex is higher ranking which i suppose is why they have the foundation to allow people to get into a higher ranked uni. I can get into both chichester and sussex easily though

    my problem is chichester being like.. 86th or something but sussex is top 25
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    I wouldn't pick a uni based on rankings as they mean very little.
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    (Original post by Dandelionnn98)
    okay so i am thinking about insurance choices rn because i am getting more and more worried about uni. I already applied to chichester psychology msci and they offered BBC. I am still waiting for sussex for psych with foundation year but i am having second thoughts about it. Should i go for the foundation year and end up at a better uni but pay an extra £9000 or go to chichester, and get a masters rather than a bsc all covered by the student loans company??
    If I were you, I'd go for the MSci, because tbh league tables don't mean a lot and getting a Masters all covered with your student loan in the same amount of time/ money required for just an undergrad at Sussex would be very tempting.

    However, I would highly recommend looking in more detail at the courses, modules offered, flexibility, specialisms, employability, opportunities for placements/ study abroad, campus environment, etc. too - these will have a HUGE impact on how much you enjoy the course, and the most important thing is how well the course suits you, not how prestigious the uni is
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    If I were you, I'd go for the MSci, because tbh league tables don't mean a lot and getting a Masters all covered with your student loan in the same amount of time/ money required for just an undergrad at Sussex would be very tempting.

    However, I would highly recommend looking in more detail at the courses, modules offered, flexibility, specialisms, employability, opportunities for placements/ study abroad, campus environment, etc. too - these will have a HUGE impact on how much you enjoy the course, and the most important thing is how well the course suits you, not how prestigious the uni is
    i know for sure i do like chichester having been to their open day. I would like to go into clinical psych but it seems chichester is heavily specialised in sport psych. I think i will go to an applicant day anyway because tbf when i went to the open day it was dull and raining which may have changed my mood therefore putting the university in a bad light. Sussex on the other hand i saw on a bright sunny day. My form tutor said its better to go for a uni i'd be happy in too. I don't know which one i would be happier at though.. i think it would be sussex but i would rather not do a foundation year
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    (Original post by Dandelionnn98)
    i know for sure i do like chichester having been to their open day. I would like to go into clinical psych but it seems chichester is heavily specialised in sport psych. I think i will go to an applicant day anyway because tbf when i went to the open day it was dull and raining which may have changed my mood therefore putting the university in a bad light. Sussex on the other hand i saw on a bright sunny day. My form tutor said its better to go for a uni i'd be happy in too. I don't know which one i would be happier at though.. i think it would be sussex but i would rather not do a foundation year
    Have you looked online at the detailed structure of the courses? Do they both offer interesting modules? Can you specialise in clinical psychology at both? Since you're interested in clinical psychology, do they both offer clinical placement opportunities? Can you study abroad? How are they assessed - lots of exams or more coursework (and what would suit you best)?

    I just had a look at the two programs (MSci Advanced Psychology at Chichester, ...)
    Chichester: uni seems to have more of a sports focus and special sports research facilities, opportunity to take third/ fourth year modules in e.g. health psychology, semester abroad opportunities (including in N. America and Europe), they also mention "internships, placements, voluntary research assistantships" but don't give much details, 69% assessed by coursework, 90% employment rate (30% in professional/ management)
    Sussex: foundation year leads onto more variety of BSc options (including "Psychology with Clinical Approaches" about which I will now focus on in this summary), loads of interesting sounding (to me!) clinical psychology modules in third year, built in year abroad/ placement year, 53% coursework, 96% employment rate (87% in professional/ management)

    Having looked at these, actually the Sussex course does look more interesting (but that's to me - you're the one studying it!)...

    Hmmm, a foundation year isn't a bad way to get into a good university, and if the course content and structure looks more interesting to you it would definitely be worth considering. There's always the option to do a masters afterwards (it doesn't mention the possibility on the undergraduate website, but Sussex do offer a separate Masters qualification in Clinical Psychology which they would probably encourage you to do after graduation if you were interested. However, it wouldn't be an integrated masters so you would have to take out separately the postgraduate student loan. Tbh, by that point you will have more of an idea whether or not you are really interested in clinical psychology or academia - if you end up going down a slightly different career path you are unlikely to need a masters anyway... (and even if you do, the Sussex undergrad course webpage lists careers their grads have gone directly into, including: assistant psychologist, NHS; mental health recovery worker, Together for Mental Wellbeing; trainee psychological wellbeing practitioner, Turning Point.)
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Have you looked online at the detailed structure of the courses? Do they both offer interesting modules? Can you specialise in clinical psychology at both? Since you're interested in clinical psychology, do they both offer clinical placement opportunities? Can you study abroad? How are they assessed - lots of exams or more coursework (and what would suit you best)?

    I just had a look at the two programs (MSci Advanced Psychology at Chichester, ...)
    Chichester: uni seems to have more of a sports focus and special sports research facilities, opportunity to take third/ fourth year modules in e.g. health psychology, semester abroad opportunities (including in N. America and Europe), they also mention "internships, placements, voluntary research assistantships" but don't give much details, 69% assessed by coursework, 90% employment rate (30% in professional/ management)
    Sussex: foundation year leads onto more variety of BSc options (including "Psychology with Clinical Approaches" about which I will now focus on in this summary), loads of interesting sounding (to me!) clinical psychology modules in third year, built in year abroad/ placement year, 53% coursework, 96% employment rate (87% in professional/ management)

    Having looked at these, actually the Sussex course does look more interesting (but that's to me - you're the one studying it!)...

    Hmmm, a foundation year isn't a bad way to get into a good university, and if the course content and structure looks more interesting to you it would definitely be worth considering. There's always the option to do a masters afterwards (it doesn't mention the possibility on the undergraduate website, but Sussex do offer a separate Masters qualification in Clinical Psychology which they would probably encourage you to do after graduation if you were interested. However, it wouldn't be an integrated masters so you would have to take out separately the postgraduate student loan. Tbh, by that point you will have more of an idea whether or not you are really interested in clinical psychology or academia - if you end up going down a slightly different career path you are unlikely to need a masters anyway... (and even if you do, the Sussex undergrad course webpage lists careers their grads have gone directly into, including: assistant psychologist, NHS; mental health recovery worker, Together for Mental Wellbeing; trainee psychological wellbeing practitioner, Turning Point.)
    oh my goodness! Thank you so much for your help!! I did see that sussex had the psychology with clinical approaches option. You are completely right about having a greater idea on whether i am interested or not. My interest is unlikely to change but it is good to have options while at sussex.

    Thanks again!
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    (Original post by Dandelionnn98)
    oh my goodness! Thank you so much for your help!! I did see that sussex had the psychology with clinical approaches option. You are completely right about having a greater idea on whether i am interested or not. My interest is unlikely to change but it is good to have options while at sussex.

    Thanks again!
    You're welcome
 
 
 

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