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Why are tuitions fees double for overseas Students in UK unlike EU uni?? Watch

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    Since UK fees are capped, the only way universities can get more money is by charging international students more. So international students are there to subsidise local students' fees and bring in more money for stuff like research or whatever the uni wants to spend money on.

    Also, as others have said, international students are not going to give so much back to the economy in terms of taxes since their parents don't live/ work here and they are unlikely to too. Therefore, it wouldn't make financial sense for the UK government to subsidise international student fees.

    Then there is the simple issue of supply and demand. UK degrees are (rightly or wrongly) valued very highly internationally, so lots of students want to come - however there are only so many places. Therefore, the price goes up to reduce the demand to only those who can actually afford to pay.
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    (Original post by LegalDiaries)
    This is what happens when you refuse to read the whole comment and instead go on a rant. If you bothered to read to the end, you would have noticed that I actually talked about choice and the fact that since no one forces you to come here, you should definately pay. But no, you only read what you want to read! I rest my case.
    I think if u, after being graduated, get a job with a good salary and u get back your investment in studies in a short period it s worthy? isnt?
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    (Original post by matt_tgr)
    I love how Americans are complaining about the cost of British universities... Guys, relax, your country charges 35k A YEAR for international students, so you have no right to complain about other countries' tuition costs
    I am not american
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    (Original post by Mistletoe)
    Their degrees generally have less value than degrees from Britain.
    I'm not sure how many British universities are offering better Masters programmes than are offered in Copenhagen, Tilburg or Lund. Nor would/should ours be any better regarded by employers.

    Their degrees perhaps have less appeal, because typically twice as long and because a large part of what tempts overseas students to the UK is the opportunity for English immersion, such that our competitor providers are not the EU nations and are Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the US.
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    Me too I cant get why tuition fees are so high comparing to the EU, though I like the UK society and degree.... I hope i can get a job later that cover back my investments
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    (Original post by LegalDiaries)
    This is what happens when you refuse to read the whole comment and instead go on a rant. If you bothered to read to the end, you would have noticed that I actually talked about choice and the fact that since no one forces you to come here, you should definately pay. But no, you only read what you want to read! I rest my case.
    I did read it all. It was about you struggling to find a morally acceptable reason and how hard done by you are. There are pefectly good reasons why you arent entitled to the same rate, which I pointed out. You havent contributed in the past, you arent a citizen and you will most likely not be contributing in the future.

    You buy a product which is based on supply and demand. It must be worth it or you would go elsewhere (many do) so spare us the hard done by and resentment, even if you acknowledge its down to your own choice and you choose to buy an education here because it is in your self interest to do so.

    Your point about people being on welfare are British is pretty irrelevant. Most students are fresh from school, so not on welfare at all. Ofc of the tiny minority that are on benefits, then they would be British because we are in Britain and they are entitled as citizens. Would you be comparing them to international students who arent on benefits?

    Your other point about getting a p/t job and being taxed. That would be the same rate as other students.

    You can rest your case elsewhere.
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    (Original post by Shelly81)
    Hello all,

    I find this unfair? could anyone explain to me plz.. it s not a kind of segregation?
    The fees for UK and EU students are subsidised by the UK government.
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    (Original post by Shelly81)
    Thank you, actually i have been several times in UK and like it very much. I like the people, the society etc..though it s little bit expensive. That s why i am planning to apply for Msc. But if you dont mind could you clarify more the second paragraph?
    If you move to the UK for a job, rather than solely to come to uni, then you start to build up years of what is formally termed "Ordinary Residence". If you move to the UK from outside the EU, once you have three full years of Ordinary Residence in the UK, you will be considered a UK student. You will pay UK tuition fees and be entitled to Student Finance as though you were a UK student.

    However, getting a work visa for the UK is pretty difficult these days. You need a job before you can apply for a visa, and only a limited number of employers are permitted to recruit from overseas.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    If you move to the UK for a job, rather than solely to come to uni, then you start to build up years of what is formally termed "Ordinary Residence". If you move to the UK from outside the EU, once you have three full years of Ordinary Residence in the UK, you will be considered a UK student. You will pay UK tuition fees and be entitled to Student Finance as though you were a UK student.

    However, getting a work visa for the UK is pretty difficult these days. You need a job before you can apply for a visa, and only a limited number of employers are permitted to recruit from overseas.
    except its 5 years you have to live here now.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    except its 5 years you have to live here now.
    I thought five years was just EU students? Have they extended the International residency requirement now as well?
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I thought five years was just EU students? Have they extended the International residency requirement now as well?
    oh ignore me I misread your post
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    well you do need to have a "settled" status, which usually means you can't be on a visa and must have right to live in the UK indefinitely
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    We need protectionist measures (in the form of higher fees for international students) to (i) enable UK students to get into the top (UK) universities, and (ii) to subsidise the education of UK students at these universities.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    I did read it all. It was about you struggling to find a morally acceptable reason and how hard done by you are. There are pefectly good reasons why you arent entitled to the same rate, which I pointed out. You havent contributed in the past, you arent a citizen and you will most likely not be contributing in the future.

    You buy a product which is based on supply and demand. It must be worth it or you would go elsewhere (many do) so spare us the hard done by and resentment, even if you acknowledge its down to your own choice and you choose to buy an education here because it is in your self interest to do so.

    Your point about people being on welfare are British is pretty irrelevant. Most students are fresh from school, so not on welfare at all. Ofc of the tiny minority that are on benefits, then they would be British because we are in Britain and they are entitled as citizens. Would you be comparing them to international students who arent on benefits?

    Your other point about getting a p/t job and being taxed. That would be the same rate as other students.

    You can rest your case elsewhere.
    I am not exactly sure you actually understood my point about welfare. There is no guarantee that those educated here as British will find jobs otherwise they wouldn't find themselves on welfare. Welfare was introduced for such things. So the assertion that they will contribute to the economy is speculative in nature. Some of them are on welfare. Some of their parents are also on welfare anyway.

    Also, the other thing that shows how flawed your argument is comes from your statement "
    You haven't contributed in the past, you aren't a citizen and you will most likely not be contributing in the future." I have contributed to this country, I am still contributing and I will be contributing to it for a long time. The same cannot be said about you who are still in school. I pay taxes on my salary. I pay VAT. I pay all sorts of other government levies. And I still paid heavily in tuition!

    Lastly, you have no right to tell me where I can rest my case. Try bullying someone else.
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      (Original post by Mistletoe)
      Their degrees generally have less value than degrees from Britain.
      Not true exactly. ETH Zurich is a better quality university than most in England but is the same (very low) price for everyone. Other universities in Germany, Switzerland and France are top quality and also really cheap if not free
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      (Original post by Shelly81)
      I think if u, after being graduated, get a job with a good salary and u get back your investment in studies in a short period it s worthy? isnt?
      It's pretty difficult to get a UK work visa these days, so most International students graduate and leave.
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      (Original post by Klix88)
      It's pretty difficult to get a UK work visa these days, so most International students graduate and leave.
      Bad news
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      (Original post by StrawbAri)
      Not true exactly. ETH Zurich is a better quality university than most in England but is the same (very low) price for everyone. Other universities in Germany, Switzerland and France are top quality and also really cheap if not free
      They're not actually cheaper or free though they just receive more subsidies from the local taxpayers.

      (Original post by LegalDiaries)
      I am not exactly sure you actually understood my point about welfare. There is no guarantee that those educated here as British will find jobs otherwise they wouldn't find themselves on welfare. Welfare was introduced for such things. So the assertion that they will contribute to the economy is speculative in nature. Some of them are on welfare. Some of their parents are also on welfare anyway.

      Also, the other thing that shows how flawed your argument is comes from your statement "
      You haven't contributed in the past, you aren't a citizen and you will most likely not be contributing in the future." I have contributed to this country, I am still contributing and I will be contributing to it for a long time. The same cannot be said about you who are still in school. I pay taxes on my salary. I pay VAT. I pay all sorts of other government levies. And I still paid heavily in tuition!

      Lastly, you have no right to tell me where I can rest my case. Try bullying someone else.
      Residents of a country being entitled to more support from the state than foreign nationals isn't an alien concept.

      If you think someone telling you that amounts to bullying you need to get a grip.
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      (Original post by PQ)


      There's definitely universities and courses that overcharge for international students simply because they can - but in general outside London and outside Business/Management courses the additional charges do reflect the additional costs of recruiting, admitting and teaching international students.
      But this is not an historically accurate representation of the difference in fees.

      Prior to 1980, universities charged fees. Those fees were in the case of home students paid by means of the fees element of local authority student grants. Universities could not in practice charge higher fees than the grants local authorities would pay and for many years the government kept the maximum amount local authorities were obliged to pay below the true cost of education. The government made up the shortfall by block grants to universities via the University Grants Committee. Those block grants kept universities pretty much under the government thumb.

      In 1980, the government required universities to charge foreign students the full cost of their courses and stopped making up the difference for overseas students with block grants.

      That is the origin of the differential fee for overseas students and has nothing to do with any additional cost of providing the course to foreigners.

      In 1998 this money circulation scheme for home students was abolished. Instead of universities charging students fees that (a) were below the true cost of education but (b) were in practice entirely paid by local authorities (who in turn received the money to pay these grants as part of their own grant from central government), home students were charged a "real" fee of £1000 and the government funded the entire remainder of the cost of higher education by means of a block grant to universities.

      Over the last 18 years that real fee has risen to now be over £9000 and loans to cover that fee have been introduced. As the fee has increased, the block grant from government to universities has been reduced and has now for all practical purposes been abolished. The government no longer directly funds undergraduate education at all and only the bad debts of the student loan provider companies count as public expenditure.

      However any connection between the cost of education and fee level has disappeared. In the case of home students, universities have to abide by an arbitrarily set fee limit in order for their students to access student loans and they charge fees at that arbitrary limit even where the cost of education is below that limit. In the case of foreigners they charge what the market will bear.
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      Because the government don't subsidise the costs like they do for home students. If you look at American universities like Cornell tuition fees are ~$55000 compared to kcl and ucl that charge ~£22000


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