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    Hi, everyone I am in year 12 doing chemistry OCR A. Is it possible for someone to explain the difference between a polar molecule and a dipole-dipole?
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    One describes a molecule that is polar, the other describes a type of intermolecular bond.

    Unless you mean polar and dipole.

    In which case one refers to a molecule that is polar the other to a bond that is polar.

    Polar bonds happen when two different elements are covalently bonded to each other, since each element has its own electronegativity value, there is always an uneven sharing of electrons (sometimes this difference is so small that it can effectively be ignored).

    Polar molecules happen when molecules have polar bonds, but the dipoles don't cancel out as the molecule is not symmetrical. Think about a mass being pulled to the right and left by the same force - the object won't move (compare with CO2), now think about the same mass being pulled down and right AND down and left each with the same force - the object moves downwards (compare with H2O).
 
 
 
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