Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Deciding whether to dropout and reapply next year? Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi. I am currently studying biological sciences at bath in my first year. Due to personal issues such as anxiety and being extremely homesick, my first term at university has not been what i expected. I feel as thought i have failed to take care of myself properly and when i visited home, many of my friends commented on how didn't look well or happy. I now realise that I was not ready or independent enough to live by myself and in hindsight should have a taken a gap year. These past few months at university have really been some some of my worst and I do not believe this is what Uni life should be like. If i do drop out, i would most likely find a part time job and then reapply for 2017 at the University of Surrey or Royal Holloway for microbiology or psychology, which are both only half an hour commute from my family home.

    I was wondering whether this seems like a valid idea due to a few points.

    1). I know i have missed the official deadline for UCAS applications and that if i sent my application in it would not get equal chance as to other people's applications (does this really affect my chances of being offered a place? my grades at A level exceed the entry requirements).

    2.) Dropping out relies heavily on being offered a place at Surrey or Royal Holloway, as one of the main reasons for dropping out would be to be closer to family so i could visit as often as possible. Are the chances of being offered a place high do you think?

    Any responses to this post would be much appreciated as at the moment i feel depressed and lonely and am not sure if i am thinking straight. I am worried that i would be dropping out for short-term happiness of spending time with my family. But i also think that perhaps a university closer to home and a different course would make me much happier and motivated to study and finish university with a 2:1 or first.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by twc39)
    Hi. I am currently studying biological sciences at bath in my first year. Due to personal issues such as anxiety and being extremely homesick, my first term at university has not been what i expected. I feel as thought i have failed to take care of myself properly and when i visited home, many of my friends commented on how didn't look well or happy. I now realise that I was not ready or independent enough to live by myself and in hindsight should have a taken a gap year. These past few months at university have really been some some of my worst and I do not believe this is what Uni life should be like. If i do drop out, i would most likely find a part time job and then reapply for 2017 at the University of Surrey or Royal Holloway for microbiology or psychology, which are both only half an hour commute from my family home.

    I was wondering whether this seems like a valid idea due to a few points.

    1). I know i have missed the official deadline for UCAS applications and that if i sent my application in it would not get equal chance as to other people's applications (does this really affect my chances of being offered a place? my grades at A level exceed the entry requirements).

    2.) Dropping out relies heavily on being offered a place at Surrey or Royal Holloway, as one of the main reasons for dropping out would be to be closer to family so i could visit as often as possible. Are the chances of being offered a place high do you think?

    Any responses to this post would be much appreciated as at the moment i feel depressed and lonely and am not sure if i am thinking straight. I am worried that i would be dropping out for short-term happiness of spending time with my family. But i also think that perhaps a university closer to home and a different course would make me much happier and motivated to study and finish university with a 2:1 or first.
    Start by asking Surrey and Royal Holloway directly whether they are still accepting applications for those courses.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the reply! much appreciated I have looked on the uni websites and they are still accepting applications till the 30th June. Do you know anything about the likelihood of being given a place when sending in a late UCAS application?
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by twc39)
    Thanks for the reply! much appreciated I have looked on the uni websites and they are still accepting applications till the 30th June. Do you know anything about the likelihood of being given a place when sending in a late UCAS application?
    You'd really have to ask them directly, and don't trust a generic date on the website. Ask them.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Right, ok, i will get on that. In your opinion, do you think it would be wiser to try and stick it out at my current university or is dropping out a viable option as well?
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by twc39)
    Right, ok, i will get on that. In your opinion, do you think it would be wiser to try and stick it out at my current university or is dropping out a viable option as well?
    That's completely up to you

    You'll be using up your "gift" year of funding be restarting elsewhere - so it might be worth sticking it out (if you pass the year (40%) then you will normally be awarded a CertHE early exit award - so you'd have something to show for your year on your CV, also find out what you accommodation contract says about leaving early - you might be financially better off to do the bare minimum and spend more time visiting home than dropping out early (once you withdraw you wont get any more maintenance loan instalments and may be asked to repay any overpayment of maintenance loan).).

    If you can find a way to get through the year, meet the basic attendance requirements while also spending more time at home to help keep yourself together then it is usually worth it....but don't make yourself ill. Do some research into your contracts and what you need to do to finish the year (and an escape plan for next year) and then make an informed decision.

    Have you tried to get sessions with the counsellors at Bath? http://www.bath.ac.uk/teams/counsell...mental-health/
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you for the reply PQ, that's a lot of really helpful advice. All i am concerned about is that dropping out after a year means that i will have to pay the full £9,000 tuition fee and full accommodation costs, but if i drop out now i believe the cost is around half of a full year. Is a CertHE early exit award worth the money? I also have an issue of housing for next year. I have put down a deposit but have yet to sign a contract so my decision needs to be made fairly soon.
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by twc39)
    Thank you for the reply PQ, that's a lot of really helpful advice. All i am concerned about is that dropping out after a year means that i will have to pay the full £9,000 tuition fee and full accommodation costs, but if i drop out now i believe the cost is around half of a full year. Is a CertHE early exit award worth the money? I also have an issue of housing for next year. I have put down a deposit but have yet to sign a contract so my decision needs to be made fairly soon.
    You may be liable for full accommodation costs anyway - that's why you need to speak to someone at your university.

    If you have a tuition loan then the difference between paying £4,500 and £9k for the year is minimal - unless you're likely to be in the top decile (10%) of earners post graduation then you aren't likely to repay your loan within the 25 year repayment period - so the size of your loan wont impact the amount or length of your repayments.

    If you withdraw now then you are likely to be asked to repay ASAP the majority of any maintenance loan you received in January (80% or more of it). Again - this is why you need to talk to someone about the detailed specifics of the costs of withdrawing before the end of the year (or at this point). It might make sense financially to withdraw now, it might make sense to withdraw in April before your final maintenance loan payment or it might make sense to stay on your course until the end of the teaching year in May.

    You need to find out the specific costs to you of withdrawing at these different points (and what levels of attendance are required from you to complete the year/gain a passing mark - you could well be able to go home for 3-4 days a week) - and then decide whether that cost is worth it for you. I can't work out if as CertHE is worth it for you - only you can make that decision and judgement.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    I find this post scary...i've just recently dropped out of first year bio at the same uni for exactly the same reasons, and am also looking at surrey/roho as they are my locals!

    Firstly with regards to dropping out, if you're not happy at uni then go for it. I have 0 regrets...i was so miserable at uni it was making me ill and leaving was a hard decision but was definitely the right one for me.

    Also with regards to missing the deadline, even if the unis get back to you and say they cant offer you a place this year does it matter if you wait an extra year? You could just work and save up tonnes of money and start later with a bit more grounding and life experience.

    I only say that because i took a gap year before uni so I was already 19 when i dropped out. I have reapplied for this september (ill be 20 then) but am in no way convinced i will be going to uni this year anyway so may put it off for another year or even longer. Theres no rush so dont panic. Im just working at the minute and enjoying that and i think if and when i decide to go to uni ill make sure its really something i want to do.

    Dont panic, and by the sounds of it uni is making you ill in the same way it was me so theres no point putting yourself through that. You're supposed to enjoy studying and if theres one thing I've learnt since leaving is that dropping out in no way means you've failed.

    Good luck in whatever you decide to do x
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I'm currently studying Biology as my degree at the moment, but I can relate to your 1st year experience - it's a really weird time when you are away from home, meeting new people etc... It took me lots of drinking to get over the anxiety which is why I didn't do as good as I could have in my 1st year academically.

    I lived in halls for the 1st year but I decided to move back home and take the train as I live about 40 minutes from my uni. I like it much better at home because my sleeping pattern isn't f-ed up, I don't have to put up with other people's living habits. If it makes you happier I definitely would apply to a new course and live at home, BUT:

    - Consider you will have to wake up SO early in the morning to get transport, I have to wake up at 6am to be in for 9am for instance.

    - It's more difficult to utilise resources like the library

    - meeting new people/social events is made much harder/doesn't happen (2nd option for me...)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .A_C.)
    I'm currently studying Biology as my degree at the moment, but I can relate to your 1st year experience - it's a really weird time when you are away from home, meeting new people etc... It took me lots of drinking to get over the anxiety which is why I didn't do as good as I could have in my 1st year academically.

    I lived in halls for the 1st year but I decided to move back home and take the train as I live about 40 minutes from my uni. I like it much better at home because my sleeping pattern isn't f-ed up, I don't have to put up with other people's living habits. If it makes you happier I definitely would apply to a new course and live at home, BUT:

    - Consider you will have to wake up SO early in the morning to get transport, I have to wake up at 6am to be in for 9am for instance.

    - It's more difficult to utilise resources like the library

    - meeting new people/social events is made much harder/doesn't happen (2nd option for me...)
    Thank you so much for replying A_C. Hearing that someone else has had similar issues and is now making it work makes me much more positive. I relate to what your saying about drinking. During fresher's I was sick because of alcohol multiple nights trying to fit in and curb anxiety, I barely drank before uni! I do understand what your saying about meeting new people and socialising. I suppose that is an inevitable consequence of living at home whilst at uni.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by whatarethis)
    I find this post scary...i've just recently dropped out of first year bio at the same uni for exactly the same reasons, and am also looking at surrey/roho as they are my locals!

    Firstly with regards to dropping out, if you're not happy at uni then go for it. I have 0 regrets...i was so miserable at uni it was making me ill and leaving was a hard decision but was definitely the right one for me.

    Also with regards to missing the deadline, even if the unis get back to you and say they cant offer you a place this year does it matter if you wait an extra year? You could just work and save up tonnes of money and start later with a bit more grounding and life experience.

    I only say that because i took a gap year before uni so I was already 19 when i dropped out. I have reapplied for this september (ill be 20 then) but am in no way convinced i will be going to uni this year anyway so may put it off for another year or even longer. Theres no rush so dont panic. Im just working at the minute and enjoying that and i think if and when i decide to go to uni ill make sure its really something i want to do.

    Dont panic, and by the sounds of it uni is making you ill in the same way it was me so theres no point putting yourself through that. You're supposed to enjoy studying and if theres one thing I've learnt since leaving is that dropping out in no way means you've failed.

    Good luck in whatever you decide to do x
    Wow! To think we have probably seen each other in lectures! that's crazy! Your response was awesome, thank you. You are absolutely right that leaving uni doesn't mean you have failed. The thought of what people and society thinks of 'drop outs' is a main reason I haven't made the decision yet.

    Thank you and good luck to you also!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    If I was you I wouldn't drop out, I know it can be hard but realistically you need to learn to deal with the reality of living away from home. You can still call your parents every night, and you can even visit on weekends. Try to find things that you do to enjoy at uni whether it be a sports team, a society, or a hobby to keep your mind of homesickness.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JustPadz)
    If I was you I wouldn't drop out, I know it can be hard but realistically you need to learn to deal with the reality of living away from home. You can still call your parents every night, and you can even visit on weekends. Try to find things that you do to enjoy at uni whether it be a sports team, a society, or a hobby to keep your mind of homesickness.
    I understand what your saying JustPadz thank you for the reply. I haven't made my decision yet. Maybe i can try out some other societies.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by twc39)
    I understand what your saying JustPadz thank you for the reply. I haven't made my decision yet. Maybe i can try out some other societies.
    In my opinion, one of the most important skills you will learn in University is how to live independently, it will be hard at first but you can't keep depending on mum and dad forever, it doesn't work quite like that.

    Try your best and stay strong bro.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Applying to uni

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Graduates celebrate

    How to write a good personal statement

    Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Two students working together

    A-Z of universities

    Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

    A student working on a computer

    Personal statement help

    Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student looking down a microscope

    Planning open days

    Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

    Help out other students

    These questions still need an answer

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.