Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I recently got my nose pierced with a 1.2 mm Labret (titanium) and has a ball on top I want to change it so it has a flat top, so do I have to stay with a labret or can I change to any style of nose stud also should I stick with titanium or can I use surgical Steel?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Murphymurphy98)
    I recently got my nose pierced with a 1.2 mm Labret (titanium) and has a ball on top I want to change it so it has a flat top, so do I have to stay with a labret or can I change to any style of nose stud also should I stick with titanium or can I use surgical Steel?
    It really shouldn't have been pierced with a labret. Nose studs are much more suited to the piercing, and are also usually thinner (usually 0.8 - 1mm) When did you have it done? My advice would be to go to a different piercer and ask for the stud to be changed. I wouldn't do it yourself if it's still relatively new. Titanium I find is better, but a lot of people aren't sensitive to stainless steel like I am. Then again, if you can stick to titanium because if you have it messed with, titanium is likely to do you better through that
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chelseadagg3r)
    It really shouldn't have been pierced with a labret. Nose studs are much more suited to the piercing, and are also usually thinner (usually 0.8 - 1mm) When did you have it done? My advice would be to go to a different piercer and ask for the stud to be changed. I wouldn't do it yourself if it's still relatively new. Titanium I find is better, but a lot of people aren't sensitive to stainless steel like I am. Then again, if you can stick to titanium because if you have it messed with, titanium is likely to do you better through that
    Any reason why? I know of lots of people who have had theirs pierced and use a labret stud.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    Any reason why? I know of lots of people who have had theirs pierced and use a labret stud.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I personally wouldn't use a labret in my nose at any point because my nose is tiny and it just wouldn't be suitable. Quite a few people do, and for a lot of people it works okay, but I don't believe they should be used initially because after the piercing itself, you need to leave room to swell. With a labret in there, you can't leave much room for swelling. With a screw or a bone, there's a lot more room for the piercing to swell and it's a lot easier to keep clean as well when it's more likely that you'll get a lot of gunk around the piercing site
    Online

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chelseadagg3r)
    I personally wouldn't use a labret in my nose at any point because my nose is tiny and it just wouldn't be suitable. Quite a few people do, and for a lot of people it works okay, but I don't believe they should be used initially because after the piercing itself, you need to leave room to swell. With a labret in there, you can't leave much room for swelling. With a screw or a bone, there's a lot more room for the piercing to swell and it's a lot easier to keep clean as well when it's more likely that you'll get a lot of gunk around the piercing site
    I mean, that is terrible advice.

    A labret is far less likely to fall out than a 'bone' or nosescrew, a labret is probably the safest and easiest jewellery with which to heal pretty much any straight piercing.

    If a piece of jewellery is too long, then it is just that, too long, go to a piercer and ask for a shorter one (or get a competent piercer who can fit appropriatley sized jewellery in the first place), doing so after a couple of weeks is a normal process that lots of people do.

    As for OP, recently is a very useful timeframe, depending on the type of labret you have you may be able to get a flat for it, if not they aren't too hard to get hold of . I'd refrain from changing the jewellery more than absolutely neccesary for at least 3 months to let everything heal nicely, I'd stick with titanium, but thats because it works well for me and I tend to find it far more reliable in quality than steel. Best thing you can do though, is go and discuss this with your piercer, there isn't a great deal the internet can do to help you really.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    I mean, that is terrible advice.

    A labret is far less likely to fall out than a 'bone' or nosescrew, a labret is probably the safest and easiest jewellery with which to heal pretty much any straight piercing.

    If a piece of jewellery is too long, then it is just that, too long, go to a piercer and ask for a shorter one (or get a competent piercer who can fit appropriatley sized jewellery in the first place), doing so after a couple of weeks is a normal process that lots of people do.

    As for OP, recently is a very useful timeframe, depending on the type of labret you have you may be able to get a flat for it, if not they aren't too hard to get hold of . I'd refrain from changing the jewellery more than absolutely neccesary for at least 3 months to let everything heal nicely, I'd stick with titanium, but thats because it works well for me and I tend to find it far more reliable in quality than steel. Best thing you can do though, is go and discuss this with your piercer, there isn't a great deal the internet can do to help you really.
    A nose screw is also unlikely to fall out. A labret would be torn out much easier, because there's no way for it to be pulled out without unscrewing. Actual nose jewellery doesn't have a disc at the end of it. Labrets do. The disc leaves no space for swelling. You can't add a good amount of length like you can with piercings labrets are usually used in, like lip piercings, because there isn't the space to do so with a nostril piercing. A competent piercer would fit a person with nose jewellery. The tissue is very sensitive as well. Now, an internally threaded labret would be much better in this case but the OP hasn't stated which type it is. For all we know, it's threaded. Not good for a thin nose piercing. For some people, a micro internally threaded labret might feel better and work out better for them. Everyone's body is different. That being said, again, I don't believe that labrets should be used in brand new piercings. The only piercer I've known to use labrets in fresh piercings also uses plastic and piercing guns. When I got mine done, the piercers there swore against it because of the issues they've seen it cause in fresh piercings.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chelseadagg3r)
    I personally wouldn't use a labret in my nose at any point because my nose is tiny and it just wouldn't be suitable. Quite a few people do, and for a lot of people it works okay, but I don't believe they should be used initially because after the piercing itself, you need to leave room to swell. With a labret in there, you can't leave much room for swelling. With a screw or a bone, there's a lot more room for the piercing to swell and it's a lot easier to keep clean as well when it's more likely that you'll get a lot of gunk around the piercing site
    The length allows for swelling in a labret as well as any other, otherwise they wouldn't use a labret as initial jewellery for anything. Granted it is not the most aesthetically pleasuring but I disagree with your other points.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    I mean, that is terrible advice.

    A labret is far less likely to fall out than a 'bone' or nosescrew, a labret is probably the safest and easiest jewellery with which to heal pretty much any straight piercing.

    If a piece of jewellery is too long, then it is just that, too long, go to a piercer and ask for a shorter one (or get a competent piercer who can fit appropriatley sized jewellery in the first place), doing so after a couple of weeks is a normal process that lots of people do.

    As for OP, recently is a very useful timeframe, depending on the type of labret you have you may be able to get a flat for it, if not they aren't too hard to get hold of . I'd refrain from changing the jewellery more than absolutely neccesary for at least 3 months to let everything heal nicely, I'd stick with titanium, but thats because it works well for me and I tend to find it far more reliable in quality than steel. Best thing you can do though, is go and discuss this with your piercer, there isn't a great deal the internet can do to help you really.
    Agreed.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    The length allows for swelling in a labret as well as any other, otherwise they wouldn't use a labret as initial jewellery for anything. Granted it is not the most aesthetically pleasuring but I disagree with your other points.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    There's more room for the extra length in the places the jewellery was actually made for. Like I've said, there isn't the room for the necessary extra length inside a nostril with the majority of people
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chelseadagg3r)
    There's more room for the extra length in the places the jewellery was actually made for. Like I've said, there isn't the room for the necessary extra length inside a nostril with the majority of people
    The length that will fit in a nostril is the same regardless of the jewellery, surely?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    The length that will fit in a nostril is the same regardless of the jewellery, surely?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I've already said this. Actual nose jewellery doesn't have the disc at the end. I've had a piercing swell into the labret before and trust me, it's not pretty. You don't have the same issue with actual nose jewellery. Really though, please stop quoting me. I don't want to repeat myself over and over. The OP has had our advice. They can take it or leave it. It's getting off topic.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chelseadagg3r)
    I've already said this. Actual nose jewellery doesn't have the disc at the end. I've had a piercing swell into the labret before and trust me, it's not pretty. You don't have the same issue with actual nose jewellery. Really though, please stop quoting me. I don't want to repeat myself over and over. The OP has had our advice. They can take it or leave it. It's getting off topic.
    Fair enough. Agree to disagree.

    OP speak to your piercer, here will be a very legitimate reason they chose a labret bar. Best to find out what that is and if you're still not happy they can recommend something else. Please be aware however that list of jewellery sold as nostril jewellery is very poor quality, and the trauma of inserting a nose screw can be very irritating for a new piercing.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.