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    Hi, I am doing a comparison between water and group6 hydrides and just wanted to know why is it that when the mass decreases in the hydride so too does the boiling point. Also why is it that water doesn't follow this rule?
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    (Original post by rdodd13251)
    Hi, I am doing a comparison between water and group6 hydrides and just wanted to know why is it that when the mass decreases in the hydride so too does the boiling point. Also why is it that water doesn't follow this rule?
    What do you think?
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    (Original post by charco)
    What do you think?
    well I don't know and that why I asked.
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    Do some research on intermolecular forces.
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    (Original post by rdodd13251)
    well I don't know and that why I asked.
    also interesting is hydrides of Gp 15 show such discontinuity/discrepancy with hydride of nitrogen also...

    the same happens with hydrides of fluorine also...

    but oddly enough, it doesnt show such discrepancy with hydrides of Gp 14.

    what in the world is going on here?
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    I'm not sure 'hydride' is the best application of nomenclature.
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    (Original post by Infraspecies)
    I'm not sure 'hydride' is the best application of nomenclature.
    i agree, but there are lots of things that are not ideal. like why is IR data recorded in strange funny looking wavenumber units?

    it is not the best way, but then the chemistry community has been used to it for so long.

    just like chlorides of xx, oxides of xx, hydrides of xx probably has a nice sound to it. i don't know to be honest. good question, actually? why indeed. when clearly there is a shift in polarity going across the third period "hydrides"
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    (Original post by shengoc)
    i agree, but there are lots of things that are not ideal. like why is IR data recorded in strange funny looking wavenumber units?

    it is not the best way, but then the chemistry community has been used to it for so long.

    just like chlorides of xx, oxides of xx, hydrides of xx probably has a nice sound to it. i don't know to be honest. good question, actually? why indeed. when clearly there is a shift in polarity going across the third period "hydrides"
    Wavenumbers are good for a variety of reasons.

    I was more shooting for 'chalcogenides'
 
 
 
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