Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Do you think that Brexit will be a good thing for this country long term? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you think that Brexit will be a good thing for this country?
    Brexit will be a good thing
    15
    48.39%
    Brexit will be a bad thing
    16
    51.61%

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by niteninja1)
    I honestly think democracy is more important.
    That's great man good for you, but i dont remember saying anything that suggests I was against democracy.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SubZero~)
    Lol? The whole Brexit campaign was utterly misleading; in fact, both the stay and leave arguments were horrendously presented to the public. I'm pretty sure the two main factors that drove the vote the way it did was the flawed arguments against immigration AND the idea that approximately £350m would be pumped back into the NHS through leaving the EU, presumably by not having to pay any membership fees and what not. For all we know, the law on the referendum of the vote could change and within 10 years time, we could see a re-vote in play, no matter how unlikely that is. The EU has its benefits to us; free trade, freedom of movement of labour and capital, etc. Sure it's not likely we will end up in the EU again for a long time, however there is always a possibility. I seem to recall a government petition to re-vote on the EU referendum being started by someone who actually voted leave; on that basis, it shows how misinformed the UK really is about the effects of leaving the EU and how politicians and the media can be powerful tools that can easily sway people who are not educated about the consequences of such decisions.
    I mean you have kind of gone on to a completely different topic on the campaign and voters decisions etc. I do agree with you that for the fact that this referendum held so much importance on Britain and it's history, I do think the campaign's were very divisive and poorly run. If you are saying just on the terms that is it possible for us to join back, then technically in the future yes we could join back however this is so unlikely due to the mass amount of factors that have to been taken into account such as would the EU allow us back in, would the eu be in a fit state that such it would benefit us to join back, would our economy be so weak we needed to join back, would British voters actually vote to remain outside the EU. There are many factors that have to be taken into account.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by econwarwicker)
    Well at the open day it seemed awesome, wasnt amazing as a campus but the teaching was amazing with so much flexibility.

    Whats your GCSEs/Alevels like?
    GCSEs not that great couple A*s then the rest A's with 1 B. A levels if all goes well and to plan, i'm looking and hoping for A*A*A. What about you?
    Online

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I can't see there being any benefit at the moment, especially with May 'negotiating' a deal. I don't see a standalone UK having much to offer.

    To be totally honest I don't think it should have ever gone to a public vote - I don't believe many laypeople have anything close to an understanding of what being a member of the EU involves and how leaving could change the UK, especially as there was no plan for leaving. There should have been a greater consultation with experts on what is best for the country, and what the risks were of leaving.

    But hey-ho, this is what we have to deal with...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GCSE2016Troop)
    GCSEs not that great couple A*s then the rest A's with 1 B. A levels if all goes well and to plan, i'm looking and hoping for A*A*A. What about you?
    I got 6A*s and predicted A*A*A. It's alright, work hard and write a solid PS + good AS grades (provided you still do them) and you'll be fine. It's the prediction that matters though.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by niteninja1)
    I honestly think democracy is more important.
    We're leaving the EU, where all MEPs are elected and they elect a president, and legislation is debated by the elected heads of all members.
    Meanwhile, we have a Prime Minister who got the job without a vote, who each week curtsies to our unelected head of state (the Queen), and all laws have to be passed by the House of Lords, none of whom are elected and none of whom can be removed by a popular vote. If democracy is more important, you must be a Remainer.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lit teacher)
    We're leaving the EU, where all MEPs are elected and they elect a president, and legislation is debated by the elected heads of all members.
    Meanwhile, we have a Prime Minister who got the job without a vote, who each week curtsies to our unelected head of state (the Queen), and all laws have to be passed by the House of Lords, none of whom are elected and none of whom can be removed by a popular vote. If democracy is more important, you must be a Remainer.
    I believe in our parliamentary democracy we do not vote for a prime minister we vote for a party. As for the her majesty queen Elizabeth she generates more for the economy than she costs so...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think a lot of people realise what trade deals involve.

    There is a trade off between having trade integration and having sovereignty, which is what the issue was with the EU.

    Sign a trade deal with the US for instance, and they are likely to demand a large say over the UK's regulation standards. Because a lot of US products don't meet the safety requirements to get in the EU they will want to be able to export to the UK so they will lock the UK in to not being able to prohibit a lot of chemicals especially in teh food sector. They will also want a lot of say over the UK environmental regulations as they will want to prevent the UK from bringing in environmental protections that harm the profits of US businesses. And they may well push for us to open up the NHS and care services to private competition from the UK.

    Also all the trade deals the US pushes for involve a supranational court that will be above any British court so if a US firm had a dispute with a rule a future UK government would bring in, they would be able to sue the government at a supranational court and get compensation from the UK taxpayer.

    Also when we look to sign a deal with India or other fast growing developing countries, they are likely to push for liberalisation of visa rules for their nationals, so to get access to their markets we will be pressured in to making it easier for their nationals to come to the UK.

    And a lot of people in the left behind industrial working class communities of the UK that currently complain about jobs going to immigrants, will find that jobs are going to cheap competition from elsewhere, because when we sign trade deals with China and other developing countries it will mean they have tariff free access to sell cheap goods in the UK which will knock out a lot of UK industry.

    Now a lot of people on the Brexit side will not mind this kind of stuff, because they want to scrap food safety / environmental regulations anyway, they see all that as "red tape", and also they will be more than happy to lock the UK in to trade deals that restrict the actions of a future government, eg if a Labour/Liberal coalition were to come in and want to restore environmental protections, the US-UK trade deal will prevent that just like EU rules prevented a lot of the freedom of movement of UK governments while we were inside it.

    The alternative is that if all these trade deals are subject to full parliamentary scrutiny, many of them will not get through because even on the Conservative side there are MPs that would be horrified at the idea of Britain surrendering a lot of the freedom of future Parliaments to make our own laws and certainly horrified at teh idea of supranational investor-state dispute settlement courts coming in over the heads of British courts. Which will mean that not many trade deals actually get done, in which case the UK will have maximum sovereignty it just means there will be some barriers to trade.

    What we may see is a real push to try and keep the detail of trade deals out of scrutiny from Parliament and out of the eyes of the media. TTIP was a classic example, that deal was shrouded in secrecy because they didn't want too much attention drawn to what was being discussed. In the end the Europeans decided they couldn't stomach it and it died. The big battle for sovereignty ahead will be fought around trade deals - particularly with the US, but don't be surprised if many of those who argued against the EU on sovereignty grounds are very eager for us to sign away sovereignty to the US, because it will lock the UK in to being the kind of low-regulation anything goes economy that they would like.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by econwarwicker)
    I got 6A*s and predicted A*A*A. It's alright, work hard and write a solid PS + good AS grades (provided you still do them) and you'll be fine. It's the prediction that matters though.
    What subjects do you do? And what career, if you know yet, are you looking to go into after your econ degree. I'm always curious to see what econ graduates go into.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GCSE2016Troop)
    What subjects do you do? And what career, if you know yet, are you looking to go into after your econ degree. I'm always curious to see what econ graduates go into.
    I do maths further maths and economics.

    Im really planning to see where life takes me. Ideally would like to work at an Investment bank or big 4. The ultimate dream is venture capital.
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    (Original post by ax12)
    I can't see there being any benefit at the moment, especially with May 'negotiating' a deal. I don't see a standalone UK having much to offer.

    To be totally honest I don't think it should have ever gone to a public vote - I don't believe many laypeople have anything close to an understanding of what being a member of the EU involves and how leaving could change the UK, especially as there was no plan for leaving. There should have been a greater consultation with experts on what is best for the country, and what the risks were of leaving.

    But hey-ho, this is what we have to deal with...
    Its a good point. what we have is a democratic vote, which is great, but people having a limited understanding on what they were voting on or its implications. It would have veen nice if wed have had the plan on the table so they could have borne that in mind when voting i.e Hard Brexit.

    We are where we are though.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by econwarwicker)
    Nope. We won't be. By the time we recover from this mess other countries would have made great strides in their development.
    As long as you assume that the EU is totally free of existential problems (which it isn't, by a long shot) then this makes sense.

    And at this point we're no longer protected by the EU and its protectionist policies.
    Protectionism is bad and stupid, so thank god we won't be dealing with it anymore. At least, as long as the Government doesn't start with tariffs of their own. But with Hammond, Johnson and Davis in cabinet I expect we'll be okay on that front.

    I suspect large amounts of trade will have moved to Asia as the focal point where theyre experiencing extremely fast growth. We're already struggling to attract FDI even within the EU and the decrease in corporation tax is a sign of how much confidence the govt has in us.
    Why is reducing corporation tax to attract investment a bad thing? Do you expect businesses to just turn up here for no reason other than we're here?

    If you're going to think long term, you're going to have to think long term on a global prospective. And by the time we're back on our feet with trade deals corporations will no longer be interested in such a self interested protectionist country when they have the US.
    Wait, so is protectionism bad or good? I'm getting mixed messages.

    The irony of brexiters is that they had so much pessimism for the EU but so much optimism for a post Brexit britain. They just choose to believe what feels good and history has always taught us that that thought process is ridiculous.
    Why are these retards even bothering to believe in something bigger than themselves, amirite?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I think Brexit can only prove beneficial if it turns out to have been a prudent bet (that was actually a lucky punt) against the future functioning of the EU, i.e. if history reveals us to have been first out of a burning cinema.

    Anyone who supposes that Britian is going to do better than the northern European nations in an EU that trundles on much as it is is surely mistaken.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I don't think a lot of people realise what trade deals involve.
    Fantastic post. Thank you for taking the time to impart that amount of analysis.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Best thing since thatcher
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I 100% believe that this country will be very very very much better off after Brexit, and in the long term. I think it will be prospering very very highly. I really do believe that we wont suffer. Our trade will be transferred to WTO rules and we will activate our free trade that is organised during the 2 years.
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ax12)
    I can't see there being any benefit at the moment, especially with May 'negotiating' a deal. I don't see a standalone UK having much to offer.

    To be totally honest I don't think it should have ever gone to a public vote - I don't believe many laypeople have anything close to an understanding of what being a member of the EU involves and how leaving could change the UK, especially as there was no plan for leaving. There should have been a greater consultation with experts on what is best for the country, and what the risks were of leaving.

    But hey-ho, this is what we have to deal with...
    I agree with this it was stupid to have a plebiscite on such a complex issue which most people don't understand enough about. Especially when there was so much nonsense propaganda from both sides.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    It will bring about new challenges and new opportunities.

    Don't ever fret that UK won't be able to trade with the EU just because there isn't membership of the single market.

    20 years ago everyone said UK will die standing because it wasn't part of the Eurozone. If it didn't die then, it won't die now or in the future.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    well its going to have to be... otherwise we are bloody screwed!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by niteninja1)
    I believe in our parliamentary democracy we do not vote for a prime minister we vote for a party. As for the her majesty queen Elizabeth she generates more for the economy than she costs so...
    A democratically chosen Prime Minister is voted for by their party and known to the electorate before a General Election. Theresa May was neither.

    Whatever the debatable economics of the Queen (Stonehenge also generates more than it costs) she is a Head of State who opens our Parliament, is Head of the Church, meets privately with the Prime Minister every week, signs our laws and represents the UK at international gatherings - all without a single UK citizen having a vote on it, or having any chance at all to remove her.

    That, and the House of Lords, is why the EU is more democratic than the UK.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.