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    Quick question/discussion:
    I'm very interested in economics, in fact I'm fairly certain I'd like to study it at university when I get round to it. However, I have little to know interest in politics.. I notice a lot of discussions here where economics and politics seem to always go together... I also tried reading the economist but found that most of the politics in it bored me.. Is my lack of interest in politics going to be a problem?
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    A lot of politics revolves around economic policy and therefore a lot of economics students are naturally interested in both subjects. However, you do not need to have an interest in politics to enjoy studying microeconomics, financial economics, even macroeconomics but some topics will touch on economic policy and monetary policy. Economics is also a subject that is best studied while keeping up with current affairs, such as by reading the Economist or the Financial Times, as this helps you to develop economic analysis skills and apply (or attempt to) economic theory into real life situations and evaluate whether they match.

    If you're very interested in economics, don't just stop studying it because you don't like politics because you don't need to have an interest in politics to study it. However, you need to have an appreciation that since economics, politics, psychology and sociology are all social sciences, they complement each other and therefore learning more about one can help you understand the other more.
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    (Original post by mark252623)
    Quick question/discussion:
    I'm very interested in economics, in fact I'm fairly certain I'd like to study it at university when I get round to it. However, I have little to know interest in politics.. I notice a lot of discussions here where economics and politics seem to always go together... I also tried reading the economist but found that most of the politics in it bored me.. Is my lack of interest in politics going to be a problem?
    Not if you are aiming for a PhD and an academic line of work. Then you can skip the politics and overload with math and stats subjects. Add programming and statistical packages like R, MATLAB and STATA for good measure. That would be the ideal profile. They are not interested in your politics, political science (there is a difference), or philosophy courses.

    But if you want a job in the government or consultancy then you have to live by Keynes' quote:

    "The master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts .... He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher—in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular, in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man's nature or his institutions must be entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood, as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near to earth as a politician.”
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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    A lot of politics revolves around economic policy and therefore a lot of economics students are naturally interested in both subjects. However, you do not need to have an interest in politics to enjoy studying microeconomics, financial economics, even macroeconomics but some topics will touch on economic policy and monetary policy. Economics is also a subject that is best studied while keeping up with current affairs, such as by reading the Economist or the Financial Times, as this helps you to develop economic analysis skills and apply (or attempt to) economic theory into real life situations and evaluate whether they match.

    If you're very interested in economics, don't just stop studying it because you don't like politics because you don't need to have an interest in politics to study it. However, you need to have an appreciation that since economics, politics, psychology and sociology are all social sciences, they complement each other and therefore learning more about one can help you understand the other more.
    Thankyou, that clears up a lot... So essentially I should probably go learn the basics of politics...
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    (Original post by StephenWond3rboy)
    Not if you are aiming for a PhD and an academic line of work. Then you can skip the politics and overload with math and stats subjects. Add programming and statistical packages like R, MATLAB and STATA for good measure. That would be the ideal profile. They are not interested in your politics, political science (there is a difference), or philosophy courses.

    But if you want a job in the government or consultancy then you have to live by Keynes' quote:

    "The master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts .... He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher—in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular, in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man's nature or his institutions must be entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood, as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near to earth as a politician.”
    Hmmm I want to go into investment banking but am too lazy to do a pure statistics or maths course... Also economics interests me.. I wouldn't want to a job in the government.. thanks for the reply!
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    (Original post by mark252623)
    Thankyou, that clears up a lot... So essentially I should probably go learn the basics of politics...
    The basics of politics will come quickly to you if you pursue an economics degree. But rest assured you can study and enjoy an economics degree without an interest in politics - I have many friends doing just that.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    The basics of politics will come quickly to you if you pursue an economics degree. But rest assured you can study and enjoy an economics degree without an interest in politics - I have many friends doing just that.
    Thanks!
 
 
 
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