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    So we have to do a practical on the thermometric titration between HCl and NaOH , and we need to plan it from scratch and write reports on it and hypothesis and so on. One of our tasks is finding the concentration of the HCl , but I want to also investigate other things , what else can I investigate ??
    Thank you


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    (Original post by Futurechemist)
    So we have to do a practical on the thermometric titration between HCl and NaOH , and we need to plan it from scratch and write reports on it and hypothesis and so on. One of our tasks is finding the concentration of the HCl , but I want to also investigate other things , what else can I investigate ??
    Thank you


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    How about the actual amount of energy released?
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    How would that be obtained , I know about E=mcΔT but what would have to be done ?


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    (Original post by Futurechemist)
    How would that be obtained , I know about E=mcΔT but what would have to be done ?


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    System vs surroundings, dear.

    Your equation that you writes involves the reactants and the products - these are the "system"

    These reaction takes place in a medium, usually solution for calorimetry type of experiment...the medium (the solution, assumed to be just water) is the "surroundings"

    Conservation of energy, whatever energy change of the system is, the opposite happens with the surroundings.

    ie with an exothermic reaction, the system releases heat. hence products have lower energy than the reactants. that energy (heat) goes to the surroundings (and hence the solution gets warmer)

    and vice versa for endothermic reactions.

    Now, Q = mc delta T
    c refers to heat capacity of water - think.....of its definition...to raise T of water by...
    delta T is temperature change of the water/solution again

    so the mass you use must be mass of solution, for the above definitions...of course, as usual, people just want to label m as "mass" which is not entirely correct. m is actually "total mass of solution/water of which you are changing the T"

    density of water is 1.00 g per cm3. so 25 cm3 of water solution (could be HCl solution) actually would weight 25 g.

    anyhow, unit of Q is that of energy

    enthalpy change is not defined simply as energy, otherwise the unit would just be that of energy. it isn't....it has got per mole

    then Q divided by something mole...gives you enthalpy change of that reaction.

    I leave it to you to read up on what that mole is of? hint..it is definitely not the water solution (unless of course we are talking of enthalpy change of neutralisation, which is another AS/A-level definition again).

    Good luck.
 
 
 
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