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How do I refer to the DSM and ICD in my psychology work? watch

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    LenniesRabbit


    I really don't know how to relate this to the ICD and DSM, I've done a bit.
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    Just to note, the new DSM (5) doesn't have axis anymore.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Just to note, the new DSM (5) doesn't have axis anymore.
    Oo. Thank you.
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    (Original post by KyleH123)
    Oo. Thank you.
    What are you exactly stuck with? You seem to have covered it quite well.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    What are you exactly stuck with? You seem to have covered it quite well.
    Well in my brief it reads that I have to refer to the ICD and DSM in my work, i don't know, have I done that enough? It's AS level stuff.
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    Ok, well briefly, the DSM & ICD focus on maladaptiveness as the basis of psychopathology - a joining of dysfunction definition & personal distress definition. But I think you've covered enough for AS.

    Maybe use one disorder as an example of how the DSM & ICD define psychopathology?
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Ok, well briefly, the DSM & ICD focus on maladaptiveness as the basis of psychopathology - a joining of dysfunction definition & personal distress definition. But I think you've covered enough for AS.

    Maybe use one disorder as an example of how the DSM & ICD define psychopathology?
    Oh that's great to hear!

    How would I go about doing that?
    Like the sort of steps a mental health professional would follow to define/classify using ICD and DSM?

    I've pretty much had to teach myself this stuff because my teacher is absolutely useless.

    Would you say it's organised properly? It's a 2 sided poster

    Oh, I should probably mention the purpose of the poster is to explain the problems classifying and defining abnormality
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Ok, well briefly, the DSM & ICD focus on maladaptiveness as the basis of psychopathology - a joining of dysfunction definition & personal distress definition. But I think you've covered enough for AS.

    Maybe use one disorder as an example of how the DSM & ICD define psychopathology?
    I just saw on your profile you're applying for PhD in psychology! I really got lucky having you reply to my thread!!

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    (Original post by KyleH123)
    I just saw on your profile you're applying for PhD in psychology! I really got lucky having you reply to my thread!!

    Pick a disorder, say depression. See how the ICD & DSM (also how they defer) refer to the different definitions.
 
 
 
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