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    I'm not very good with stats, the question is for a stats course at Uni, I've posted the question below, what I want to find out is the probability of the chance of the first 2 employees being affected by the bonus, I know that the chance of being affected for the other 2 are 50% as is it equiprobable. I'm not sure how to get the probability for the first two employees. I would be grateful if somebody could explain.

    The owner of a small firm is thinking of giving a raise to his four best performing employees to ensure that they will not leave for another company. He knows that some of them are less likely to be affected by the bonus than others so he tries to figure out whether the overall impact is worthwhile. After reviewing the records of the four employees he concluded that one of them is unlikely to be affected to search for another job so he assumes that the chance of being affected by the raise is 70% lower than the chance of not being affected. For another employee he assumes the opposite; and for the other two he assumes that the chances are equiprobable. If his decision to go ahead with his plan depended on whether the probability of the event ‘at least 3 employees will be affected by the raise’ is greater than a threshold value, which of the following options is closer to that probability?
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    bump .....
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    (Original post by Joey952)
    bump .....
    So are you looking for two numbers with a difference of 70 that add to 100?
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    So are you looking for two numbers with a difference of 70 that add to 100?

    I'm not entirely sure what the question is asking? is this how the question should be interpreted ?
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    (Original post by Joey952)
    I'm not entirely sure what the question is asking? is this how the question should be interpreted ?
    I think so ... they have expressed the probs as percentages and said one is 70% more than the other.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    I think so ... they have expressed the probs as percentages and said one is 70% more than the other.
    so it this case what do you think the probabilities for the 2 would be ?
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    (Original post by Joey952)
    so it this case what do you think the probabilities for the 2 would be ?
    I think you can work that out?

    Use algebra if you have to ...

    a + b = 100 etc.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    I think you can work that out?

    Use algebra if you have to ...

    a + b = 100 etc.
    just 30 and 70 ?, sorry my maths is really not up to scratch
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    (Original post by Joey952)
    just 30 and 70 ?, sorry my maths is really not up to scratch

    The difference between those is 40 and it needs to be 70.

    Try 85 and 15
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    The difference between those is 40 and it needs to be 70.

    Try 85 and 15

    thanks soo much !!!!
 
 
 
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Updated: January 19, 2017
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