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Should we pay to attend a GP? Watch

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    How would you make people pay? Or would you not allow people to attend until they've paid? For some people, £25 is a lot of money. especially if like me, you have to go quite often.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    That is just your expectoration.
    :rofl:
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    Access to healthcare should be a right, not a privilege.
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Access to healthcare should be a right, not a privilege.
    It's a shame dental treatment isn't free
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    If we can charge for prescriptions, why not the visit itself instead?

    If people are genuinely ill and need treatment they would have needed to pay anyway*, so the argument that it puts off 'the poor' doesn't really bear out.



    *In a means tested way.
    the numbers of chargable prescriptions issued is quite small and smaller still if you consider the number of people who have an ongoing condition but who have to pay for prescriptions so get a PPC.

    a means and/or emotive based exemption from charging would just encourage the self same abusers of the service to continue abusing it as it's them who wouldn't be paying.
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    We do pay through taxes.
    If you mean pay at point of access, then no, because that defeats the point of the NHS constitution.

    All it would do is stop the most vulnerable in society accessing appropriate medical care including people on low incomes and elderly pensioners who have limited funds and don't want to waste anyone's time.
    It would make healthcare completely unaffordable for those with chronic health conditions who need regular GP reviews for medication management or just general monitoring.
    Whilst I can see why some people might think it's a great idea because it would reduce time wasting, I think this positive effect pales in comparison to the inevitable fact that there would be more avoidable deaths caused.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    PRSOM

    a penalty fee for those who simply don;t turn up ( even if people cancel the appt a few minutes before they are due to attend it can still be used , rather than creating the problem of a late attender who doesn't communicate this if they then turn up )
    The problem with this is the hard cases and unjust outcomes of such a scheme. What do you do with the man with severe depression who just can't bring himself to attend his appointment five minutes before he's due? Or the woman on a zero-hours contract who's called into work with a moment's notice and who can't afford to turn that work down? Or the elderly lady who gets easily confused because of memory problems and wrote her appointment down wrongly?

    A penalty system just ends up hurting the weakest and most vulnerable the hardest. Yes, you'd probably penalise the thoughtless few who just miss appointments routinely because of disorganisation or disrespect towards the NHS. But that's not worth hurting the rest of patients who miss appointments for quite different reasons. We must keep the concept of free at the point of care, based on need rather than ability to pay.
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    (Original post by Len Goodman)
    Yes, yes we should. There are special snowflakes who visit the doctor over every tiny little thing, even the most minor of colds. People should only feel the need to see a doctor when it is urgent, and the most effective way to cut down on these pointless appointments would be to charge. £25 a visit would be a good starting point in my opinion, and if needs be we could increase.
    Says the guy "living on the bank of mum and dad"
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    (Original post by SonoLuma)
    Says the guy "living on the bank of mum and dad"
    You what? I am a hardworking taxpayer, thank you very much.
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    (Original post by Len Goodman)
    You what? I am a hardworking taxpayer, thank you very much.
    As you can tell, I am quoting you from a previous thread.
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    No. Then poor people won't be able to get treatment.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    The problem with this is the hard cases and unjust outcomes of such a scheme. What do you do with the man with severe depression who just can't bring himself to attend his appointment five minutes before he's due? Or the woman on a zero-hours contract who's called into work with a moment's notice and who can't afford to turn that work down? Or the elderly lady who gets easily confused because of memory problems and wrote her appointment down wrongly?

    A penalty system just ends up hurting the weakest and most vulnerable the hardest. Yes, you'd probably penalise the thoughtless few who just miss appointments routinely because of disorganisation or disrespect towards the NHS. But that's not worth hurting the rest of patients who miss appointments for quite different reasons. We must keep the concept of free at the point of care, based on need rather than ability to pay.
    Still seems like the best option to me when these reasons would be on the more rare occasions. Maybe include more leniency to those with chronic conditions who require frequent visits. This could easily cut down waiting times, saving money and hours.
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    So should people pay if they don't attend their appointment instead?
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    The problem with this is the hard cases and unjust outcomes of such a scheme. What do you do with the man with severe depression who just can't bring himself to attend his appointment five minutes before he's due? Or the woman on a zero-hours contract who's called into work with a moment's notice and who can't afford to turn that work down? Or the elderly lady who gets easily confused because of memory problems and wrote her appointment down wrongly?

    A penalty system just ends up hurting the weakest and most vulnerable the hardest. Yes, you'd probably penalise the thoughtless few who just miss appointments routinely because of disorganisation or disrespect towards the NHS. But that's not worth hurting the rest of patients who miss appointments for quite different reasons. We must keep the concept of free at the point of care, based on need rather than ability to pay.
    first scenario - well that is what an appeal system is for

    second scenario - highly improbable that thwere would be no time to make a phone call / drop an email / use the practice website or app ...
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    Nah don't think so. I'd charge a penalty for missed appointments, quite significant, say £50.

    Then I'd be tempted to charge for drunk timewasters in A&E, especially if they need to be removed due to aggression. After all you throw up in a cab in Notts it's a £75 penalty for the main black cabs I think (well that was a couple of years back), but your costing the NHS a lot more when they have to deal with comatose arse, yet no fine. You pay through your taxes sure, but I pay for refuse collection...yet I can't take the piss and fill up 5 bins and expect them to take it.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    If we can charge for prescriptions, why not the visit itself instead?

    If people are genuinely ill and need treatment they would have needed to pay anyway*, so the argument that it puts off 'the poor' doesn't really bear out.

    *In a means tested way.
    Visits don't always lead to prescriptions.

    If a prescription costs money then people will probably pay, but if it costs money to get the prescription then people are going to be less likely to go. Why? Because at that stage they don't know if something wrong with them to the extent that they need treatment. You wouldn't want to pay £25 to find out that nothing is wrong with you.

    Also, not all treatments need to be paid for.
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    (Original post by Corbynista)
    Prescription charges are not applicable across the whole UK because some of us... you know don't have an uncaring government.
    Thanks to the unique way England funds the lesser partners you mean ...
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    Thanks to the unique way England funds the lesser partners you mean ...
    Do you seriously want to go there? Scotland has paid in more than it has got out for decades.

    http://wingsoverscotland.com/information-retrieval/

    http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/th...8-union-public
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    (Original post by joey11223)
    Nah don't think so. I'd charge a penalty for missed appointments, quite significant, say £50.

    Then I'd be tempted to charge for drunk timewasters in A&E, especially if they need to be removed due to aggression. After all you throw up in a cab in Notts it's a £75 penalty for the main black cabs I think (well that was a couple of years back), but your costing the NHS a lot more when they have to deal with comatose arse, yet no fine. You pay through your taxes sure, but I pay for refuse collection...yet I can't take the piss and fill up 5 bins and expect them to take it.
    Drunk and incapable should be charged 80gbp , and it should be considered those whose primary reason for attendance / admission is because they were intoxicated when they had whatever mishap brought them to the ED ...

    after all if they got a white blue light taxi and a night in PC Plods B+B they'd be getting an 80 gbp Penalty Notice for Disorder so why should D+I be treated more leniently than D+D epspecially as it's Chief Officers not the courts or Parliament who decided D+I doesn't exist any more
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    (Original post by Corbynista)
    Do you seriously want to go there? Scotland has paid in more than it has got out for decades.

    http://wingsoverscotland.com/information-retrieval/

    http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/th...8-union-public
    based in the Scottish Nasty Party Fantasy that all the North Sea oil and gas revenue is Scottish and that all the taxes paid due to it would be paid in scoltand
 
 
 
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