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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    The BBC article (or any article I've read) wasn't very specific about the situation and only stated he was mistaken for the same man in 2009 so it is easy to assume this is someone the police have been looking for for a while.
    Also in an earlier post of yours, you implied that this is just what you suspect.
    No, no. There is a difference between whether the police have grounds to arrest someone for a specific offence and that person being known to the police as a criminal.
    .
    Either way, the police clearly have records of what happened in 2009. There must be records showing Mr Adunbi is not in fact the actual drug dealer/criminal?
    How many more times will they have to harass Mr Adunbi before they realise he may not be the actual criminal?
    But why would they look? These particular police officers see a man whom they believe is a certain person. They have no idea Mr Adunbi exists. They want to conduct a stop and search on the other person to see if they get lucky and find he is carrying drugs. Why do they conduct any check on the person they suspect it to be at all. They know the person they suspect it to be, is a criminal. What information do they need from the police computer?
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    (Original post by joe cooley)
    SJW juvenile nonsense.

    Unless of course you can provide evidence to back up such a stupid claim?

    LOL,as if.
    No it's a fact
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    (Original post by james813)
    No it's a fact
    It is?

    Well, why don't you provide evidence of this fact ?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No, no. There is a difference between whether the police have grounds to arrest someone for a specific offence and that person being known to the police as a criminal.
    .
    If so then why was Mr Adunbi arrested in 2009 if the actual criminal isn't someone that has committed an arrest-able offence but is merely a known criminal they stop and search from time to time?
    Mr Adunbi being arrested the first time and then released due to mistaken identity implies the actual criminal is someone they were looking to arrest at the time or am I missing something/?


    But why would they look? These particular police officers see a man whom they believe is a certain person. They have no idea Mr Adunbi exists. They want to conduct a stop and search on the other person to see if they get lucky and find he is carrying drugs. Why do they conduct any check on the person they suspect it to be at all. They know the person they suspect it to be, is a criminal. What information do they need from the police computer?
    They need to know that Mr Adunbi, A man living at so so address in Bristol is not actually a criminal they have been aware of since 2009 so that incidents where he is encountered won't actually lead to them mistakenly identifying him as the actual criminal again. Even if it is a case where the actual criminal is stopped and searched regularly to see if he has drugs on him and they supposedly know who the person is, why do they keep mistaking this criminal for the same man? Why shouldn't all the police be aware that though he looks similar, Mr Adunbi is not the criminal they know?
    It doesn't make sense that the old man has to be harassed by police every time they spot him because he unfortunately looks like a particular criminal.
    This isn't a mistake that should be made twice by the same police force.
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    (Original post by joe cooley)
    It is?

    Well, why don't you provide evidence of this fact ?
    www.google.co.uk
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    Providing a link to Google only proves you are simply parroting SJW ********.

    Here's a novel concept for you.

    Think for yourself, don't rely on others to do your thinking for you.

    I know it sounds scary but you should at least try, you may surprise yourself!

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    If so then why was Mr Adunbi arrested in 2009 if the actual criminal isn't someone that has committed an arrest-able offence but is merely a known criminal they stop and search from time to time?
    Mr Adunbi being arrested the first time and then released due to mistaken identity implies the actual criminal is someone they were looking to arrest at the time or am I missing something/?
    The police make exactly the same mistake in 2009 as they make in 2016. They see someone who they think is a known criminal they want to shake down and on each occasion the person they come across is the lawabiding Mr Adunbi who is of course (perhaps unlike the other man) not taking any steps to avoid coming into contact with the police. We know not how often the police have come into contact with the real criminal in the last few years.


    They need to know that Mr Adunbi, A man living at so so address is not actually a criminal they have been aware of since 2009 so that incidents where he is encountered won't actually lead to them mistakenly identifying him as the actual criminal again. Even if it is a case where the actual criminal is stopped and searched regularly to see if he has drugs on him and they supposedly know who the person is, why do they keep mistaking this criminal for the same man? Why shouldn't all the police be aware that though he looks similar Mr Adunbi is not the criminal they know?
    It doesn't make sense that the old man has to be harassed by police every time they spot him because he unfortunately looks like a particular criminal.
    We are making the assumption that there is a worthwhile resemblance between the criminal and Adunbi. If there isn't then the "other person" is just a cover for harassing random black men and it is a coincidence they have harassed the same man twice.

    I think you may be being unrealistic about information. I think this all depends on how prominent the other man is in the criminal fraternity. How many known criminals are there in Bristol? How many lookalikes do those criminals have?
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    (Original post by joe cooley)
    Providing a link to Google only proves you are simply parroting SJW ********.

    Here's a novel concept for you.

    Think for yourself, don't rely on others to do your thinking for you.

    I know it sounds scary but you should at least try, you may surprise yourself!

    Good luck.
    Turning to abuse because you have lost the argument. You decided to assume what I was saying was a prejudiced unproven claim when it has been proven many times. Then when you find I am right, you tell me to think for myself, not to accept findings of studies... Perhaps you think its ok for innocent men to be tasered in the face.
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    He wasn't being aggressive. The accusing way they approached him was wrong and he refused to be addressed that way. He simply tried to walk back into his home and they tasered him.
    How the hell do you justify that?
    They mistakenly identified him as a wanted criminal. On being approached and asked to identify himself, he could either:
    A) Show some ID, thus immediately resolving the situation, with everyone safely on their way within minutes, or
    B) Refuse to identify himself and attempt to forcibly push past the police and avoid any cooperation or interaction, thus raising the police's suspicions that they had correctly identified a wanted criminal.

    He chose B, with unsurprising results.
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    (Original post by james813)
    Turning to abuse because you have lost the argument. You decided to assume what I was saying was a prejudiced unproven claim when it has been proven many times. Then when you find I am right, you tell me to think for myself, not to accept findings of studies... Perhaps you think its ok for innocent men to be tasered in the face.
    Abuse?

    No, you made a claim and assured me that it was a statement of fact.

    When asked to provide evidence to show this to be so you refused/were unable to.

    You can hardly complain if others believe you to be spouting nonsense when you are unable to back up your own argument.

    Perhaps you think its ok for innocent men to be tasered in the face.

    If they resist arrest, yes.

    In my younger days i was arrested 2-3 times, after the first time it became obvious that only a moron does not cooperate when interacting with the police.

    The idiot we are discussing should know that better than anyone.
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    They were going to arrest him anyway because they were looking to take in any remotely questionable looking black man.
    Oh, were they? And you know this how?
    Mr Adunbi sports a very particular look, so it is likely that the wanted man is of similar appearance.
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    (Original post by QE2)
    They mistakenly identified him as a wanted criminal. On being approached and asked to identify himself, he could either:
    A) Show some ID, thus immediately resolving the situation, with everyone safely on their way within minutes, or
    B) Refuse to identify himself and attempt to forcibly push past the police and avoid any cooperation or interaction, thus raising the police's suspicions that they had correctly identified a wanted criminal.

    He chose B, with unsurprising results.
    Refer to post 161. Or better yet, read the thread and watch the full video. There's more to it than "black man attacks police for harassing him". The man acted within his rights, the police did not act lawfully/how they should have.

    (Original post by nulli tertius)

    I think you may be being unrealistic about information. I think this all depends on how prominent the other man is in the criminal fraternity. How many known criminals are there in Bristol? How many lookalikes do those criminals have?
    Well then it is a case of waiting to receive information about the actual criminal then.
    Still I stand by the notion that it's questionable of the police to make the same mistake twice.
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    (Original post by Rk2k14)
    Surely multiple officers can deal with a 63yr old man without tasering him.
    Surely a 63 year old man can identify himself to the police when asked (especially in the context of mistaken identity, and having worked on a police relations group!)
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    No that's not what I said. I said he's been through this before. For the same reason as now which is how he looks. He was just going about his business so of course he will be annoyed.
    What does that have to do with it? How are the two officers supposed to know that he has worked on a police advisory group, or that he had been arrested 8 years ago?

    Especially considering all that he does to help with peace in the community.
    Which makes you wonder why, on being asked to identify himself, he refused and tried to get inside his house, against the wishes of the police? Are those the actions of someone concerned with working with the police?

    If it was any other old person of a different race in the same position and with the same experience I'd be making this argument too.
    If it was a spotty teenage chav, it wouldn't have ever made the papers.

    It is simply unfair to antagonise somebody that works for your community,
    Which, ironically, is exactly what Mr Adunbi did to the police!

    esp as it's an older person that could've died from that kind of shock.
    Could he? What are the statistics for increased risk of death due to age? Or are you just making it up?

    There was/is always a better way of doing it.
    Indeed. Provide the police with ID when they suspect that you are a wanted criminal and you know they are mistaken.
    Why on earth would anyone refuse to cooperated and forcibly attempt to leave the situation?

    Why can't we criticise the police for using more force than necessary with people they aren't even sure about of any race?
    We can, when it is justified.
    Until all the evidence is available (police body cams, etc) it is impossible to say. However, what we do know is that Mr Adunbi refused to cooperate with a reasonable request from the police and thus escalated the situation.

    Why couldn't the police have come to him in a calm and rational manner?
    From the video, it appears that they did.
    Why couldn't Mr Adunbi respond in a clam and rational manner?
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    (Original post by joe cooley)
    Abuse?

    No, you made a claim and assured me that it was a statement of fact.

    When asked to provide evidence to show this to be so you refused/were unable to.

    You can hardly complain if others believe you to be spouting nonsense when you are unable to back up your own argument.

    Perhaps you think its ok for innocent men to be tasered in the face.

    If they resist arrest, yes.

    In my younger days i was arrested 2-3 times, after the first time it became obvious that only a moron does not cooperate when interacting with the police.

    The idiot we are discussing should know that better than anyone.
    It was an unlawful arrest; he had every right to resist it.

    There are protocols that must be followed before firing off a taser. The police is entirely in the wrong, whereas the man's reaction to the harassment was natural, legal, and understandable.

    This isn't "SJW nonsense".
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Stupid morons -______-

    It would be funny if it weren't so racist. They tasered their own race relation officer. :rofl:
    He isn't the police's race relations officer. He was involved with a police-community relations group.
    A good example of the quality of many of the comments on this.

    Stuff like this breaks down any illusion that police are anything other than the state's henchmen.
    If you mean that the state employs the police to enforce the laws enacted by the state, then you are entirely correct. Why do you have a problem with that? It is the whole purpose of the police!
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    Please read the thread.
    This is the second time the police are mistaking this man for the same person.
    It is incredibly stupid that since 2009 the police still do not know how the actual suspect looks like/possible location and will willingly harrass any black man that vaguely fits the description. What are the odds that a wanted criminal will stay in plain sight going about normal business even though he knows he is wanted by police?

    Most normal people would've reacted the same way if they were notable peacemakers in their society and have literally made it their job to help race relations in their community only to be harassed not once but twice just because of the way they look.
    So he looks like the person they were after, should every police officer know who has been mistaken for someone else in the past?

    I'm not saying that the police were right in how they handled this situation but both sides did not help it.

    This also wasn't racist racist policing it was poor policing.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    It was an unlawful arrest; he had every right to resist it.

    There are protocols that must be followed before firing off a taser. The police is entirely in the wrong, whereas the man's reaction to the harassment was natural, legal, and understandable.

    This isn't "SJW nonsense".
    When was it decided that this was an unlawful arrest?

    It is SJW nonsense, if the guy tasered had been white it wouldn't have made the news and you wouldn't be using it as an excuse to signal your virtue.

    Just think the silence over black on black killings as compared to the orgy of virtue signalling aboul police killings of blacks in the US.

    You get the picture.
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    (Original post by QE2)
    What does that have to do with it? How are the two officers supposed to know that he has worked on a police advisory group, or that he had been arrested 8 years ago?
    He has been mistaken for being the same man twice. It is incompetent of the police to make the exact same mistake twice. Why shouldn't they be aware that Mr Adunbi is not in fact the criminal they mistook him for in 2009? Why weren't these two police officers aware of this? because there are records most likely available. How many times will Mr Adunbi be harassed by police before they finally realise he's not the criminal they are looking for?

    Which makes you wonder why, on being asked to identify himself, he refused and tried to get inside his house, against the wishes of the police? Are those the actions of someone concerned with working with the police?
    Because
    1. He was approached in an antagonising manner.
    2. He expressed annoyance at the fact that this is the second time he's been accused of being the same person.
    3. He was well within his rights to refuse to give his name. He was well within his rights to defend himself from the police and walk back to his home.

    If it was a spotty teenage chav, it wouldn't have ever made the papers.
    Well a random spotty chav is different from an older man that is a prominent member of society who has been in this situation twice. Of course it's going to make the news. It'd make the news no matter what colour he was. I'm sure you can tell the difference between the two.


    Which, ironically, is exactly what Mr Adunbi did to the police!
    Except he didn't. What he did was defend himself and express annoyance at the situation and that is within his rights.


    Could he? What are the statistics for increased risk of death due to age? Or are you just making it up?
    He could have because elderly people are more susceptible to serious health risks when tasered according to the TASER warnings and instruction booklet
    He was tasered in the face, without warning, which also goes against the TASER warnings and instructions booklet. The police officer also used poor technique and did not aim properly increasing the health risk.

    Indeed. Provide the police with ID when they suspect that you are a wanted criminal and you know they are mistaken.
    Why on earth would anyone refuse to cooperated and forcibly attempt to leave the situation?
    He was well within his rights to do so as he was not under arrest till after he was tasered.
    Maybe if the police followed protocol and issued a proper warning before firing the taser he would have tried to reason with them.

    We can, when it is justified.
    Until all the evidence is available (police body cams, etc) it is impossible to say. However, what we do know is that Mr Adunbi refused to cooperate with a reasonable request from the police and thus escalated the situation.
    But in this situation is not justified. The man acted within his rights and lawfully. The police did not as you can see from careful analysis of the full, unedited video posted several times in this thread.


    From the video, it appears that they did.
    Why couldn't Mr Adunbi respond in a clam and rational manner?
    Again, watch the full unedited video. Even the witness recording repeatedly says that the police started it by harassing him.
    And Mr Adunbi did reaping in a calm manner at the start but they continued to harass him so of course he will get shouty.
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    (Original post by StrawbAri)
    He has been mistaken for being the same man twice. It is incompetent of the police to make the exact same mistake twice. Why shouldn't they be aware that Mr Adunbi is not in fact the criminal they mistook him for in 2009? Why weren't these two police officers aware of this? because there are records most likely available. How many times will Mr Adunbi be harassed by police before they finally realise he's not the criminal they are looking for?



    Because
    1. He was approached in an antagonising manner.
    2. He expressed annoyance at the fact that this is the second time he's been accused of being the same person.
    3. He was well within his rights to refuse to give his name. He was well within his rights to defend himself from the police and walk back to his home.


    Well a random spotty chav is different from an older man that is a prominent member of society who has been in this situation twice. Of course it's going to make the news. It'd make the news no matter what colour he was. I'm sure you can tell the difference between the two.



    Except he didn't. What he did was defend himself and express annoyance at the situation and that is within his rights.



    He could have because elderly people are more susceptible to serious health risks when tasered according to the TASER warnings and instruction booklet
    He was tasered in the face, without warning, which also goes against the TASER warnings and instructions booklet. The police officer also used poor technique and did not aim properly increasing the health risk.


    He was well within his rights to do so as he was not under arrest till after he was tasered.
    Maybe if the police followed protocol and issued a proper warning before firing the taser he would have tried to reason with them.


    But in this situation is not justified. The man acted within his rights and lawfully. The police did not as you can see from careful analysis of the full, unedited video posted several times in this thread.




    Again, watch the full unedited video. Even the witness recording repeatedly says that the police started it by harassing him.
    And Mr Adunbi did reaping in a calm manner at the start but they continued to harass him so of course he will get shouty.
    You do realise that the police are human don't you? They can't just know that the person who looks like the suspect isn't the suspect but somebody who has been confused for him before?
 
 
 
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