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    How is it possible for mesosomes (limited to prokaryotes) to participate in aerobic respiration if prokaryotic cells do not have mitochondria?
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    wasn't mesosomes proven to be artefacts and not actaully apart of a prokayotes ultrastructure?
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    What do you mean by artefact? 😂 I'm just going off from what I'm being taught about cell ultrastructure and what Alevel biology revision sites class, "mesosmoes" to be and that is as a prokaryote. Hence I don't understand the explanation of it 'participating' in aerobic respiration.

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    I believe mesosomes (infoldings of the plasma membrane) are essentially the cristae of prokaryotes as they don't have mitochondria. They increase surface area and enzymes associated with respiration in a prokaryotic cell are found in the infoldings (mesosome). Also, not all prokaryotes have mesosomes.
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    And where is the cristae located? In the inner membrane foldings of the mitochondria, not the plasma membrane of a eukaryotic cell. If we were to apply the same knowledge to prokaryotic cells it would be contradictory, as it can't be explained without the existence of the mitochondria.

    Furthermore, this is exactly what biology revision sites do, as they have stated specifically that “both mesosomes and the cristae of mitochondria participate in the aerobic part of aerobic cellular respiration.” - Prokaryotic Cell Structure (http://m.ivyroses.com/Biology/Cells/...-Structure.php) Now this is basically saying that prokaryotes have mitochondria with inner membrane foldings called mesosomes. However, on the other hand, there is another contradictaory fact: respiration occurs in the cytoplasm. Everything is just contradicting everything at the moment.

    I understand that THEY could respire in different ways - anaerobically, through glycolysis which would remove the existence of mitochondria - but not aerobically (ceullur respiration or electron transport-requires oxygen, therefore is aerobic)


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    lol can any biologists explain this?

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesosome
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    (Original post by TerribleGrades)
    What do you mean by artefact? 😂 I'm just going off from what I'm being taught about cell ultrastructure and what Alevel biology revision sites class, "mesosmoes" to be and that is as a prokaryote. Hence I don't understand the explanation of it 'participating' in aerobic respiration.

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    lol dont you know what an artefact is, you need to know it when you learn about microscopes. (im doing OCR BTW..)
    here:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesosome
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    I really don't know much about this kind of thing, but having read some of the responses, is it fair to say that you don't understand how bacteria respire aerobically without mitochondria? Well the mesosomes will be similar to the cristae of mitochondria (to increase surface area for ox phos) and the thing to remember here is that mitochondria derive from bacteria, so bacteria are essentially free-living mitochondria and therefore they will be able to do aerobic respiration in an identical way to eukaryotic cells. So yh, if mesosomes do have a purpose then one would assume it's to increase the surface area for enzymes involved in aerobic respiration. I have just answered that based on other responses in the thread, I've never heard of mesosomes before ngl
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    Bacteria perform aerobic respiration in basically the same way mitochondria do - by breaking down glucose, passing the energetic electrons from NADH to water to pump protons from their cytoplasm to their periplasm, and then powering ATP synthase using that proton gradient to phosphorylate ADP to ATP.

    Mesosomes take no part in this because they are basically a figment of the fixing procedure used to put bacteria on a microscope slide - living bacteria don't have them. That's what's meant by an "artefact" - an observed phenomenon produced by the means by which you're looking at something, rather than by the thing itself.
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Bacteria perform aerobic respiration in basically the same way mitochondria do - by breaking down glucose, passing the energetic electrons from NADH to water to pump protons from their cytoplasm to their periplasm, and then powering ATP synthase using that proton gradient to phosphorylate ADP to ATP.

    Mesosomes take no part in this because they are basically a figment of the fixing procedure used to put bacteria on a microscope slide - living bacteria don't have them. That's what's meant by an "artefact" - an observed phenomenon produced by the means by which you're looking at something, rather than by the thing itself.
    I see thanks!
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    I really don't know much about this kind of thing, but having read some of the responses, is it fair to say that you don't understand how bacteria respire aerobically without mitochondria? Well the mesosomes will be similar to the cristae of mitochondria (to increase surface area for ox phos) and the thing to remember here is that mitochondria derive from bacteria, so bacteria are essentially free-living mitochondria and therefore they will be able to do aerobic respiration in an identical way to eukaryotic cells. So yh, if mesosomes do have a purpose then one would assume it's to increase the surface area for enzymes involved in aerobic respiration. I have just answered that based on other responses in the thread, I've never heard of mesosomes before ngl
    Thanks.
    Really? Yeah the have often been discredited as artefacts in the science community.


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    (Original post by TerribleGrades)
    Thanks.
    Really? Yeah the have often been discredited as artefacts in the science community.


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    Yh have you ever heard of the endosymbiotic theory? But, if they're artefacts anyway then it doesn't really matter what they do in respiration tbh
 
 
 
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