How tf do you revise for English GCSE

Watch
metamorphic
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I'm almost at the point where I am genuinely about to give up for English Literature. I'm currently doing the OCR 9-1 english exam, and for my mock exam we were examined on Poetry and Macbeth, of which I overall scored 39/80 despite putting a lot of effort into it, which equated to a 4 (equivalent of a D).

As for my revision for the exam, I simply collated a quote bank for Macbeth based on the characters - for example quotes for Macbeth, L. Macbeth, etc. With those quotes I would also note down any literary techniques used, and I simply memorised them for the exam.
As for`the poetry, I made notes on each individual poem in the anthology (I'm doing the conflict poetry cluster), and in my notes I made 3 different points and techniques per poem.
For the poetry questions, I overall got 26/40, which itself is quite bad, and to be honest I'm not even too sure what I did wrong, with the only comment from my teacher being that I am not always relating back to the question (the question was to identify how a poem displays negative emotions).
But for the Macbeth question, I got a rather atrocious 13/40. The question was "How is Banquo shown to be a significant character", and to be honest I didn't actually do any notes on Banquo prior to the exam, but even then I feel like I have just done badly overall. Not to mention in my previous English Language exam I got 65%, which equated to a 5 (C grade).

Overall, I just want to know how all of you guys revise and study for English, and if there are any books I should get. The current books I need to study for my English Literature is Macbeth, War of the Worlds, and Never Let Me Go.
Any help would be appreciated.
0
reply
2384911
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by metamorphic)
4 (equivalent of a D).
Image
0
reply
lawmanqq1999
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
Hey! I know revising for English can be a pain sometimes, it's different to other rote learning subjects. I would suggest making essay plans, alongside your memorizing stuff. It's great that you are memorizing stuff because that's necessary, but from what I can tell by teacher feedback, it's more your actual essay technique which is limiting you a bit

Essay writing is honestly like riding a bike, just keep practicing, making plans or talking through an essay title so you have a better grip on it, I hope I helped


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
soontobemidwife
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
well in my literature english mock i got a 7 which i am okay with but want better so since then i've just been writing essays and getting my english teacher to mark them , two of my recent poetry one and were 27/30 and 28/30 which is level 8 (i would still like level 9) but all i have been doing in writting essays and working on the feed back although it may seem boring planning reallllyyy helps and finding main points and the effect on the ready , my exam board is aqa and we've been provided with 8 books which are so good to but i'm not sure about OCR .Mr bruff on youtube is really good too hope this helps
0
reply
username2802824
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
I got 78 out of 80 in my English Literature Mock (a 9), and I didn't even do that much revision but the revision I did do was effective. I memorized the context for all the poems and which poems I'd compare to which. I knew what all the poems were about pretty well without further revision, so I sort of made a few notes on each of the poems and the main points I might make but I didn't really learn these points. I ended up getting 38/40 on the poetry section.

For Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (which I got 40/40 for) I did the same, learnt quotes for each character and made sure I knew the gist of the book.

I would say with English Lit it comes down to how well you can actually write essays and whether or not you can innately understand a text. I'm an extremely avid reader, and so deriving meaning and ethos' from a text comes very easily to me, and so I'm usually able to make quite an original response in the exam which affords you extra marks. For example the poem that came up in my exam was Hawk Roosting, and by common consensus most people would compare this to say Ozymandias, but I compared it to the Prelude instead because I wanted to be more original in my response. I argued that both poems talked about conflict with nature from different perspectives but that fundamentally both referred to humanity erring from it's true nature. In addition providing loads and loads of analysis is key. If you're learning quotations, make sure you can say a lot about that quote in the exam.
0
reply
e2014
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by Avarti)
I got 78 out of 80 in my English Literature Mock (a 9), and I didn't even do that much revision but the revision I did do was effective. I memorized the context for all the poems and which poems I'd compare to which. I knew what all the poems were about pretty well without further revision, so I sort of made a few notes on each of the poems and the main points I might make but I didn't really learn these points. I ended up getting 38/40 on the poetry section.

For Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (which I got 40/40 for) I did the same, learnt quotes for each character and made sure I knew the gist of the book.

I would say with English Lit it comes down to how well you can actually write essays and whether or not you can innately understand a text. I'm an extremely avid reader, and so deriving meaning and ethos' from a text comes very easily to me, and so I'm usually able to make quite an original response in the exam which affords you extra marks. For example the poem that came up in my exam was Hawk Roosting, and by common consensus most people would compare this to say Ozymandias, but I compared it to the Prelude instead because I wanted to be more original in my response. I argued that both poems talked about conflict with nature from different perspectives but that fundamentally both referred to humanity erring from it's true nature. In addition providing loads and loads of analysis is key. If you're learning quotations, make sure you can say a lot about that quote in the exam.
Do you go to a private school? Sorry if that's too personal but you got such a high mark.
0
reply
username2802824
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by e2014)
Do you go to a private school? Sorry if that's too personal but you got such a high mark.
No I go to a grammar school, but honestly some of the best advice I can give to getting good at English Literature is to read. I've been an avid reader since a very young age and it's really stood me in good stead. The more you read, the better at english you'll be.
1
reply
lawmanqq1999
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by Avarti)
No I go to a grammar school, but honestly some of the best advice I can give to getting good at English Literature is to read. I've been an avid reader since a very young age and it's really stood me in good stead. The more you read, the better at english you'll be.
thoroughly agree with the last bit of that! reading is so key in english, even if it's just articles or the newspaper
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (617)
33.73%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (769)
42.04%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (362)
19.79%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (81)
4.43%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed