Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

B1107 – Voluntary Prisoner Euthanasia Bill 2017 Watch

    • Wiki Support Team
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    B1107 – Voluntary Prisoner Euthanasia Bill 2017, ByronicHero (seconded by Quamquam123 MP)
    Voluntary Prisoner Euthanasia Bill


    BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

    1. Death


    (1) Any prisoner serving a sentence of at least 15 years is able to request euthenasia.
    (2) The request is granted except where there is compelling evidence of coercion or considerable mental impairment.
    (3) Decisions pertaining to 1.(2) are made by a panel.

    2. The Panel

    (1) A panel is convened within 2 months of the date of request.
    (2) The panel consists of a doctor, a senior member of prison staff, a psychologist and an advocate who is chosen by, or appointed for, the prisoner.
    (3) The panel considers pertinent information pertaining to the request. This includes, but is not limited to: the prisoner's mental health, their likelihood of being coerced and whether they have any reasonable expectation of being released in the near future.
    (4) A period of 2 months is allowed following the date of the panel hearing for professional tests and assessments to be completed.
    (5) 2 months after the first panel a second panel meeting is convened.
    (6) A conclusion is reached regarding the prisoner's request.
    (7) If granted, the execution must happen within 2 months of this date.

    2. Method

    (1) The sedative sodium thiopental is intravenously administered to induce a coma. Once it is certain that the patient is in a deep coma, pancuronium is administered to stop breathing and cause death.

    3. Right of withdrawal

    (1) The prisoner may withdraw from the process at any point.
    (2) A prisoner who withdraws is not eligible to apply again for consideration for a period of 10 years.

    4. Commencement, short title and extent

    (1) This may be cited as the Voluntary Prisoner Euthenasia Act 2017
    (2) This act shall extend to England; and
    (3) Shall come into force immediately following Royal Assent; and
    (4) Shall be provided to the Welsh Assembly Government for their consideration; and
    (5) Subject to changes made by the National Assembly for Wales; and
    (6) Subject to an affirmative vote shall come into force immediately following Royal Assent.


    Notes
    1) A person has supreme right to their own life. If they wish to end it, they should be allowed to. This bill aims to make that a reality. Somebody should not be forced to live in a cage for a long period of time if they would rather end their life.
    2) Religious taboos regarding suicide are irrelevant.
    3) The method is chosen as it is what a number of progressive countries use to assist suicide. If somebody has a different method please do say so.
    4) This is not the same as supporting the death penalty. If you think it is, you are beyond my help.
    5) There would be some cost involved, certainly. It wouldn't be substantial and would be partially offset by the money saved by not feeding them etc.
    • Very Important Poster
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Not sure why this is up at this time, but absolutely agree with this!
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Not sure why this is up at this time, but absolutely agree with this!
    It triggered the pre moderation thing I believe
    • Very Important Poster
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by joecphillips)
    It triggered the pre moderation thing I believe
    Ahh yeh, fair enough! In any case, I still support it haha!
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Aye aye captain! Excellent bill that would pragmatically increase prison space and save government money keeping people locked up for such long sentences.

    Would also reduce the costs of execution I imagine because at the moment countries refuse to sell lethal injection drugs to the US state governments where its legal on moral grounds, obviously that doesn't apply in this case as it's voluntary and the prisoners are consenting.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Aye, if one wishes to die during such a long sentence (and doesn't have considerable mental impairment) then they should be allowed to.
    • Political Ambassador
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Not sure why this is up at this time, but absolutely agree with this!
    (Original post by joecphillips)
    It triggered the pre moderation thing I believe
    Yes, it was. Didn't realise it would just show up whenever though :lol:

    (Original post by Connor27)
    Aye aye captain! Excellent bill that would pragmatically increase prison space and save government money keeping people locked up for such long sentences.

    Would also reduce the costs of execution I imagine because at the moment countries refuse to sell lethal injection drugs to the US state governments where its legal on moral grounds, obviously that doesn't apply in this case as it's voluntary and the prisoners are consenting.


    Yes they do do indeed refuse. Like you, I assume they wouldn't refuse this. Sometimes an execution can cost more than imprisonment, but that is often due to massive legal costs and endless appeals that happen before someone is eventually executed. This wouldn't have such issues.

    (Original post by LifeIsFine)
    Aye, if one wishes to die during such a long sentence (and doesn't have considerable mental impairment) then they should be allowed to.
    Agreed.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I am curious as to where the prison sentence of 15 years comes from, and also if this would apply to those who have already been sentenced to 15+ years in jail even if they only have a couple of those left to serve.

    I also wonder if those who so opposed the euthanasia bill last term will also be against this.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    No. This isn't punishing the prisoner for the crime they've committed. Plus this is implicitly capital punishment.

    Wtf
    • Political Ambassador
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kay_Winters)
    I am curious as to where the prison sentence of 15 years comes from, and also if this would apply to those who have already been sentenced to 15+ years in jail even if they only have a couple of those left to serve.

    I also wonder if those who so opposed the euthanasia bill last term will also be against this.
    Honestly, it was an arbitrary line to test the water. I'm not wedded to the idea of it being 15 years necessarily.

    Well, currently it would - yes. Though if they do not have long left on their sentence the panel would reject their request.

    (Original post by Emily Porter)
    No. This isn't punishing the prisoner for the crime they've committed. Plus this is implicitly capital punishment.

    Wtf
    Prison shouldn't be about punishment for punishment sake. That's ridiculous.

    Your second point is incorrect as there is no punishment.

    Also, your points contradict each other.
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I doubt this'll surprise anyone but I'm strongly opposed.

    I agonised and continue to agonise over the concept of euthanasia. But I was not distressed when the Assisted Dying Act passed (I was one of only 3 to abstain) because I understood it would only apply to the terminally ill and I can respect how one might want to take control of one's destiny in such a situation. But this? This is revolting.

    I will not tolerate the worst criminals taking the easy way out and I won't allow those who might otherwise be rehabilitated to, in a moment of weakness, let themselves be lost forever. The clear implication of this bill is that a prisoner's life is worth less depending on the sentence they're serving - why else would the 15 year requirement be included. Prisons should provide a tough but ultimately transformative, positive experience. They should not be places that people kill themselves to leave.

    I strongly encourage colleagues to reject this bill and the thinking behind it.
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Just execute them to begin with
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I agree with my party on this one; our criminal justice system should be focused on rehabilitation, and if you're given a lengthy sentence, you should be able to request euthanasia.

    I would make some modifications to the bill now that I think of it, because if you're 20 and get out in 15 years you're still only 35. But on principle, the logic of the bill is in the right place.
    • Political Ambassador
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RayApparently)
    I doubt this'll surprise anyone but I'm strongly opposed.

    I agonised and continue to agonise over the concept of euthanasia. But I was not distressed when the Assisted Dying Act passed (I was one of only 3 to abstain) because I understood it would only apply to the terminally ill and I can respect how one might want to take control of one's destiny in such a situation. But this? This is revolting.

    I will not tolerate the worst criminals taking the easy way out and I won't allow those who might otherwise be rehabilitated to, in a moment of weakness, let themselves be lost forever. The clear implication of this bill is that a prisoner's life is worth less depending on the sentence they're serving - why else would the 15 year requirement be included. Prisons should provide a tough but ultimately transformative, positive experience. They should not be places that people kill themselves to leave.

    I strongly encourage colleagues to reject this bill and the thinking behind it.
    1) I think it is interesting that you call this the easy way out. The implication being that they should be forced to do it 'the hard way'. I'd like to ask you what you think the point of prison is? It seems you think it is rehabilitation, which is fine. Unless you think the purpose is punishment I don't think your argument here holds at all. Your language, too, is interesting. You won't 'tolerate the worst criminals...'. Would you tolerate the other criminals having the right to end their own life or is that a right you seek to deny only the 'worst criminals'?

    2) You say in a moment of weakness but this make it seem like you've not read the bill. I'm unconvinced the 6 months of persistent desire would count as 'a moment' even in the life of an Elf.

    3) That implication is silly. Longer sentences = less actual life to be led afterwards. Mill considered long prison sentences like being confined to a living tomb. I tend to agree. If you'd spent any time in a cell you might agree too. I ask again, why do you seek to rob people of their fundamental right to end their own life? Why do you wish to force them to persist, even if professionals declare they are fit to make the decision? Why can a person not decide they do not wish to live a life that makes them brutally unhappy? I think the idea that people should be forced against all reason to live in a cage for years, and not allowed to opt out, inherently cruel.

    4) I agree with what I think your argument is at the end - that the prison system needs to be such that people are supported, and not made to feel helpless. Where they might learn skills and receive support to modify their behaviours. I agree. I also think it is completely irrelevant to the point here.

    I fear we are simply too far apart on this issue to meet anywhere near the middle.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emily Porter)
    No. This isn't punishing the prisoner for the crime they've committed. Plus this is implicitly capital punishment.

    Wtf
    Far from it, considering that this is consensual and voluntary.
    • Wiki Support Team
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RayApparently)
    I doubt this'll surprise anyone but I'm strongly opposed.

    I agonised and continue to agonise over the concept of euthanasia. But I was not distressed when the Assisted Dying Act passed (I was one of only 3 to abstain) because I understood it would only apply to the terminally ill and I can respect how one might want to take control of one's destiny in such a situation. But this? This is revolting.

    I will not tolerate the worst criminals taking the easy way out and I won't allow those who might otherwise be rehabilitated to, in a moment of weakness, let themselves be lost forever. The clear implication of this bill is that a prisoner's life is worth less depending on the sentence they're serving - why else would the 15 year requirement be included. Prisons should provide a tough but ultimately transformative, positive experience. They should not be places that people kill themselves to leave.

    I strongly encourage colleagues to reject this bill and the thinking behind it.
    +1

    Ultimately, this stops prison being the rehabilitative process it should be
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    +1

    Ultimately, this stops prison being the rehabilitative process it should be
    And life sentences don't?
    • Political Ambassador
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    :facepalm2:
    • Wiki Support Team
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    And life sentences don't?
    Life Sentences aren't really sentences for life though, are they? The vast majority of people still have a life at the end of it.
    • Political Ambassador
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    Life Sentences aren't really sentences for life though, are they? The vast majority of people still have a life at the end of it.
    Ummm, nobody survives a proper life sentence, that's kinda what life means...
 
 
 
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 4, 2017
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.