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B1107 – Voluntary Prisoner Euthanasia Bill 2017 Watch

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    (Original post by Gladstone1885)
    I agree with my party on this one; our criminal justice system should be focused on rehabilitation, and if you're given a lengthy sentence, you should be able to request euthanasia.[
    So how do you rehabilitate someone once they've euthanised?
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    So how do you rehabilitate someone once they've euthanised?
    Short sharp shock, might even revive them
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    I don't usually use any sort of "slippery slope" arguments, but the idea of prisons as a place where people can quietly off themselves is very frightening to me. Under a despotic government, a dissenting person could be arrested off the street, convicted, quietly executed, and then the public could be told that he was given a life sentence and that he opted for euthanasia.

    Our current government would never do such a thing, of course, but it still seems a bad idea even to give them the means to.
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    I don't usually use any sort of "slippery slope" arguments, but the idea of prisons as a place where people can quietly off themselves is very frightening to me. Under a despotic government, a dissenting person could be arrested off the street, convicted, quietly executed, and then the public could be told that he was given a life sentence and that he opted for euthanasia.

    Our current government would never do such a thing, of course, but why even give them the means to?
    So people don't get sovereignty over their bodies and lives, isn't it great to see the left 'representing the common peoples' interests' as always...

    /s
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    I don't usually use any sort of "slippery slope" arguments, but the idea of prisons as a place where people can quietly off themselves is very frightening to me. Under a despotic government, a dissenting person could be arrested off the street, convicted, quietly executed, and then the public could be told that he was given a life sentence and that he opted for euthanasia.

    Our current government would never do such a thing, of course, but it still seems a bad idea even to give them the means to.
    It would take more than 6 months before they could be euthanised so it would be very hard for what you are saying to take place
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    So people don't get sovereignty over their bodies and lives, isn't it great to see the left 'representing the common peoples' interests' as always...

    /s
    Punishment always involves some infringement of a person's sovereignty over their life. It's sad, but it's necessary. If we wanted to absolutely preserve the bodily autonomy of convicts, we wouldn't give them a choice between prison and euthanasia - we'd simply leave them on the street.
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Punishment always involves some infringement of a person's sovereignty over their life. It's sad, but it's necessary. If we wanted to absolutely preserve the bodily autonomy of convicts, we wouldn't give them a choice between prison and euthanasia - we'd simply leave them on the street.
    Wait, what?

    How does prison impinge on their bodily sovereignty? It's not like we live in North Korea with forced labour camps and torture for criminals, prisons in the UK are generally, pretty good quality, their purpose being to protect the wider public from dangerous people.

    Now, when in there, the criminals, at the moment, have a choice: rehabilitate, or rot in here for the rest of your life.

    What's more humane? Letting them end their lives peacefully and with dignity, or leaving them to rot.
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    (Original post by Emily Porter)
    No. This isn't punishing the prisoner for the crime they've committed. Plus this is implicitly capital punishment.

    Wtf
    It's not punishment if it's voluntarily obtained.
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    I can't say I like this as an automatic right. I would be open to a discussion on allowing prisoners equal rights to euthanasia as those now enjoyed by others, but this is just mad. If a prisoner is given a sentence then the victims and the general public should be able to assume that it will be served.

    Even within the context of this bill I think 3(2) is particularly damaging, and risks pushing a prisoner who might be undecided artificially down the euthanasia route.
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Sure, in a broad sense I agree. However, in the case of incarcerated individuals and those with debilitating diseases this line of reasoning erodes itself for obvious reasons. It is necessary to have some sort of intervention protocols in prison to account for short-term mental decline, but far more importantly for coercion and intimidation. This bill isn't seeking to provide euthanasia for anyone who wants it, it is addressing a specific case where a group of people have an inalienable right stripped from them. I therefore don't think that broad-brush arguments hold here. In short, it isn't easy to commit suicide in prison. The numbers are relatively high as compared to the general population, but as compared to the amount of suicides that are stopped it isn't.

    Is there some way to change this bill which would placate you?
    The only way to placate me is to substitute this with just executing them in the first place, the state should not endorse suicide in any instance, especially as a way to get out of a punishment; if they want to take the cowards way out then they can try to join the 1:1000, and if they fail keep trying.

    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    If suicide is so easy, why are you still alive?
    Well, the obvious answer is that I do not actually wish to kill myself.
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    Wait, what?

    How does prison impinge on their bodily sovereignty? It's not like we live in North Korea with forced labour camps and torture for criminals, prisons in the UK are generally, pretty good quality, their purpose being to protect the wider public from dangerous people.

    Now, when in there, the criminals, at the moment, have a choice: rehabilitate, or rot in here for the rest of your life.

    What's more humane? Letting them end their lives peacefully and with dignity, or leaving them to rot.
    Do you know what would be even more humane for all involved: not committing the crime that got them there in the first place? And the primary purpose of prison is not protection of the general public, it is punishment for their crimes; about 10% are imprisoned for less than a year, that does not scream protection, because imprisonment for protection would be indefinite in length, they would be imprisoned until they were deemed safe, or they died. About 30% are in for fraud and theft related offences, a few percent are in for motoring offenses, and I don't imagine many of them were unlicensed. 15% are in for drug offenses, who is being protected there? Less than half the UK prison population is in for crimes where it can be easily argued their incarceration also protects the general public.
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    This bill has entered cessation.
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    This bill has been withdrawn!
 
 
 
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