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    Hi,

    I have applied to medical school (2017 entry) and have had interviews that seem to have gone well. I also have my 5th choice offer for MSci Chemistry at UCL. I have wanted to do medicine for a long time and have put so much time and effort into work experience at hospitals etc and it all looks like an amazing career, but I am having second thoughts.

    Although money is not by any means my main motivation, when I compare how much you make after 5 years of medical school to a potential starting salary in say banking after 4 years of Chemistry, there is no comparison. I am also relatively right wing in my political views, and am pro-privatisation. This is obviously a viewpoint that can get you crucified in medical school, however I do not like the idea of working in the public sector. I was thinking of going abroad after MBBS but am unsure how viable this is.

    Any advice/opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you,
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    (Original post by rwuk)
    Hi,

    I have applied to medical school (2017 entry) and have had interviews that seem to have gone well. I also have my 5th choice offer for MSci Chemistry at UCL. I have wanted to do medicine for a long time and have put so much time and effort into work experience at hospitals etc and it all looks like an amazing career, but I am having second thoughts.

    Although money is not by any means my main motivation, when I compare how much you make after 5 years of medical school to a potential starting salary in say banking after 4 years of Chemistry, there is no comparison. I am also relatively right wing in my political views, and am pro-privatisation. This is obviously a viewpoint that can get you crucified in medical school, however I do not like the idea of working in the public sector. I was thinking of going abroad after MBBS but am unsure how viable this is.

    Any advice/opinions would be greatly appreciated.


    Thank you,
    Medicine is not a uniformly left wing profession. I'd hesitate in calling it left wing at all. It is really rather rare to find medical students participating in non-medical student politics or demonstrations at university. Traditionally doctors could be relied upon to be quite centrist and middle class - people like that vote Conservative or Liberal.

    However - this is not a hard right wing profession either. Many doctors vote Tory, but they do it not because they hate immigrants or the EU (after all, many of their colleagues or teachers may be immigrants or of immigrant descent - the NHS is extremely diverse), but more likely often due to economic/pragmatic reasons. Medicine is not a left wing profession, but neither are there many doctors who would support the Trump or Farage school of conservativism either.

    Most doctors, whether Tory or not however do support the principles of the NHS, which is why the junior doctor contract was so good at (briefly) uniting doctors across the political spectrum. You're right, you would probably raise eyebrows if you started preaching the "benefits" of privatising the NHS, as most of your colleagues stil support the organisation and its aims. But it's not likely anyone will be asking you for a press conference any time soon, so assuming you're not planning on writing a column in the Spectator, why is this even likely to be a problem?

    But if you don't like working in the public sector at all, then yes, you should consider another job, because as a medical student and junior doctor, you will be working in bog standard NHS hospitals dealing with bog standard social and health problems.

    It is also worth bearing in mind that with the exception of the USA, most other English speaking developed countries also have quite robust public healthcare systems. So perhaps you'd want to think about where "abroad" will be...
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Medicine is not a uniformly left wing profession. I'd hesitate in calling it left wing at all. It is really rather rare to find medical students participating in non-medical student politics or demonstrations at university. Traditionally doctors could be relied upon to be quite centrist and middle class - people like that vote Conservative or Liberal.

    However - this is not a hard right wing profession either. Many doctors vote Tory, but they do it not because they hate immigrants or the EU (after all, many of their colleagues or teachers may be immigrants or of immigrant descent - the NHS is extremely diverse), but more likely often due to economic/pragmatic reasons. Medicine is not a left wing profession, but neither are there many doctors who would support the Trump or Farage school of conservativism either.

    Most doctors, whether Tory or not however do support the principles of the NHS, which is why the junior doctor contract was so good at (briefly) uniting doctors across the political spectrum. You're right, you would probably raise eyebrows if you started preaching the "benefits" of privatising the NHS, as most of your colleagues stil support the organisation and its aims. But it's not likely anyone will be asking you for a press conference any time soon, so assuming you're not planning on writing a column in the Spectator, why is this even likely to be a problem?

    But if you don't like working in the public sector at all, then yes, you should consider another job, because as a medical student and junior doctor, you will be working in bog standard NHS hospitals dealing with bog standard social and health problems.

    It is also worth bearing in mind that with the exception of the USA, most other English speaking developed countries also have quite robust public healthcare systems. So perhaps you'd want to think about where "abroad" will be...
    Thank you for your help,

    I am by no means the radical Trump/Farage right-winger, I'd more describe myself as a middle-of-the-road conservative, but you are right, I will not be interrogated about that any time soon.

    With regards to abroad, I was thinking of the USA, although I am unsure how hard this is to do. I have tried to research it but the information is vague and sparse.

    Also, I would like to be in a position where I can potentially earn a large salary, but I'm not 100% money-driven.

    I spent a week shadowing a surgeon at an NHS hospital and I like the look of the job, but I am not a fan of the whole modus operandi of the NHS and could not see myself spending all of my days in the public sector.

    I find it quite ironic that I am contemplating medicine or chemistry, which seems to draw me to banking. The most moral profession and the most seemingly amoral.

    Thanks,
 
 
 
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