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How does the depth of water affect wave speed? Watch

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    I'm doing my controlled assessment for physics... However, I can't really find any research that I can understand or convert to simpler terms to write down in my hypothesis... I know that as the depth of the water increases, so does the wave speed but I'm not sure on why. Thanks.
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    (Original post by KitsuneRaiju9786)
    I'm doing my controlled assessment for physics... However, I can't really find any research that I can understand or convert to simpler terms to write down in my hypothesis... I know that as the depth of the water increases, so does the wave speed but I'm not sure on why. Thanks.
    I believe it's to do with friction.

    In shallow waters, water waves experience a frictional drag from the bottom of the surface (i.e. bottom of a tray).

    In deeper waters, you have water waves moving over water waves. There is less friction and the speed is greater.
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    (Original post by crashMATHS)
    I believe it's to do with friction.

    In shallow waters, water waves experience a frictional drag from the bottom of the surface (i.e. bottom of a tray).

    In deeper waters, you have water waves moving over water waves. There is less friction and the speed is greater.
    For sufficiently shallow water, you'll find that the wave speed is v = \sqrt{dg}, where d is the depth and g is the acceleration due to gravity. For deeper water the equations get more complicated and v depends also upon the wavelength \lambda nested in the term \frac{d}{\lambda}, which you can think of as the relative depth of the water.
 
 
 
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