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    I'm 25, I graduated from the University of Edinburgh a couple of years ago with a first class degree in Modern Languages though I'm currently working as a freelance writer. I enjoy it, but it doesn't pay the bills--my partner helps out a lot. I want to be able to continue to write, though it would be better if I could earn more than I currently am doing if I want to contribute to the family we'd like to start in the near future.

    I am keen on doing a masters and perhaps going onto a Phd. I considered Comparative Literature, though I'm not sure I would feel fulfilled emotionally doing something that is very interesting but perhaps not contributing much to mankind. I worked for a while as an editorial assistant in a well-known publishing house, though found this to be a glorified office position. I had considered Law several times growing up, though I guess I don't really know what the job would entail other than my own imaginary idea of it. The thing I most want to achieve is helping people.

    If I were to proceed, which conversion courses would you recommend? Not really sure where to start.
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    in order to excel in law, you have to be able to study things you don't enjoy
    if you can do that, sure, law's for you
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    in order to excel in law, you have to be able to study things you don't enjoy
    if you can do that, sure, law's for you
    No enjoyable aspect of it? What about after graduating--is the profession itself fulfilling?
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    I am not sure whether pursuing legal studies will help you achieve financial stability, and I am also slightly concerned about the possibility that you incur hard to repay debts as a result of going back to university to study. I would definitely not advise you to pursue a PhD, as I do not personally think that it would add value to your current profile, unless your intentions are to enter academia, which may not pay you much more thanews you earn now. I would recommend you to look into marketing communications or ecommerce copy writing roles, as you current profile may be sufficient to secure a role. Or if university is really what you have in mind, I would recommend you to study a masters in financial management. Upon scouring the Internet you will find an abundance of entry level finance jobs, but I would not say the same with law. The final decision is yours. Best of luck!
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    To properly practise law you would need to do the GDL and thereafter LPC (presuming you were to be a Solicitor and presuming the qualification is still around by the time you get there). These two qualifications would set you back approx. £20k.

    You would then need to obtain a training contract (again presuming this is still the method of qualification when you get round to it) at a firm that undertakes 'nice' law as you state you would like to help people.

    Solicitor jobs in 'nice' law are largely with high street firms that are both struggling financially due to various changes in the law (importantly funding) and pay poorly.

    If I was you then I would look elsewhere. Perhaps look at working as a Mental Health Advocate (speaking on behalf of people lacking mental capacity) or similar fulfilling jobs.
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    (Original post by lizfairy)
    I'm 25, I graduated from the University of Edinburgh a couple of years ago with a first class degree in Modern Languages though I'm currently working as a freelance writer. I enjoy it, but it doesn't pay the bills--my partner helps out a lot. I want to be able to continue to write, though it would be better if I could earn more than I currently am doing if I want to contribute to the family we'd like to start in the near future.

    I am keen on doing a masters and perhaps going onto a Phd. I considered Comparative Literature, though I'm not sure I would feel fulfilled emotionally doing something that is very interesting but perhaps not contributing much to mankind. I worked for a while as an editorial assistant in a well-known publishing house, though found this to be a glorified office position. I had considered Law several times growing up, though I guess I don't really know what the job would entail other than my own imaginary idea of it. The thing I most want to achieve is helping people.

    If I were to proceed, which conversion courses would you recommend? Not really sure where to start.
    Hi ! I assuming that since you studied at Edinburgh, you would be looking to complete your law degree at a Scottish institution.

    If this is the case, then you would have another 3 years of education (2 years LLB postgrad + 1 year Diploma in Professional Legal Practice), as well as a further 2 years in a traineeship (during which you will be earning roughly 20k).

    I haven't looked up recent figures for the degree fees, but I remember 2 years ago they were 6k per year, so you would be looking to spend roughly 20k in order to start in an entry level legal job.

    I am currently studying the LLB (as an undergrad), and from what I have learned from the other postgrads on the course, they find it difficult to balance the demands of their other careers with their legal studies. Therefore part time is also an option, but you would be extending the time until you actually being your legal career.

    Traineeships in Scotland are also in high demand at the moment and competition is stiff.
    Basically, it is a hell of a lot of grief and money when there are alternative paths that you may also enjoy.

    I helping people is what you aspire to do then maybe a career in psychology or counselling is for you.
    Alternatively a 1 year masters programme in another field i.e. business or marketing will also allow you to land a job in order to support a future family.

    Hope this helps !
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    (Original post by evalilyXOX)
    Hi ! I assuming that since you studied at Edinburgh, you would be looking to complete your law degree at a Scottish institution.

    If this is the case, then you would have another 3 years of education (2 years LLB postgrad + 1 year Diploma in Professional Legal Practice), as well as a further 2 years in a traineeship (during which you will be earning roughly 20k).

    I haven't looked up recent figures for the degree fees, but I remember 2 years ago they were 6k per year, so you would be looking to spend roughly 20k in order to start in an entry level legal job.

    I am currently studying the LLB (as an undergrad), and from what I have learned from the other postgrads on the course, they find it difficult to balance the demands of their other careers with their legal studies. Therefore part time is also an option, but you would be extending the time until you actually being your legal career.

    Traineeships in Scotland are also in high demand at the moment and competition is stiff.
    Basically, it is a hell of a lot of grief and money when there are alternative paths that you may also enjoy.

    I helping people is what you aspire to do then maybe a career in psychology or counselling is for you.
    Alternatively a 1 year masters programme in another field i.e. business or marketing will also allow you to land a job in order to support a future family.

    Hope this helps !
    Thanks for this, it does seem daunting. While I'd be prepared to put in a couple more years, that amount of time and competition does seem more than I'm willing to do. I think I'm going to pursue Creative Writing--not guaranteed a job at the other end but something I would enjoy, and if all goes wrong I can always teach.
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    (Original post by lizfairy)
    Thanks for this, it does seem daunting. While I'd be prepared to put in a couple more years, that amount of time and competition does seem more than I'm willing to do. I think I'm going to pursue Creative Writing--not guaranteed a job at the other end but something I would enjoy, and if all goes wrong I can always teach.
    I see you've already made your decision, but just to put the final nail in the coffin on this, you would be a terrible mismatch for a legal career. You are not dodging a bullet, you're dodging a nuke. It's very long hours, very tedious study, dull work and if you want to be "emotionally fulfilled", just forget about it.
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    (Original post by flatlined)
    I see you've already made your decision, but just to put the final nail in the coffin on this, you would be a terrible mismatch for a legal career. You are not dodging a bullet, you're dodging a nuke. It's very long hours, very tedious study, dull work and if you want to be "emotionally fulfilled", just forget about it.
    Thanks for the wake up call--I'm fine with long hours if it feels I'm doing something even slightly meaningful, though I guess this would mean giving free legal assistance to people and not earning anything.
 
 
 
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