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    Warwick Pros:
    Target for IB
    Consistently ranked in the top 3 year on year (I know, rankings aren't everything)
    Generally better employment statistics (taken from WhichUni)

    Warwick Cons:
    Campus university (not really my thing)
    Location and social life
    Poor accommodation (imo)

    Durham Pros:
    Nicer location
    Better accommodation
    Still respectable in terms of employment
    [I get to surround myself with other Oxbridge rejects]

    Durham Cons:
    The flipside of Warwick's pros - employment, finance, etc.
    Poor for research

    I think I know what most people will say but I'm still interested to hear what people think. Outside of high finance, would going to Durham negatively affect my employment prospects? I'm not sure about what I want to do as a career so I would like to keep my options open.

    I am also considering getting a masters in economics as well.
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    I think it really depends on what you want to get out from university. I'd say having an economics degree in both uni would put you in a decent spot in terms of job prospect, and ww might give u a slight edge over durham for ibank...When applying, a CV may get you through some initial process but its ultimately down to how you present yourself as an individual (not much difference when you get to interview stage), but as you mention life in ww might not suit you well, so its up to yourself to determine the pros and cons. these are just my humble opinions
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    I really don't see why one would offer better or worse employment potential over the other. You should choose which university you prefer, and it seems to be Durham (I'd also argue it's a far nicer place!)
    I also did IB
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    (Original post by francais123)
    I also did IB
    OP is talking about investment banking, not the international baccalaureate.

    -----

    If you want to go into banking, then Warwick. If you don't, then it probably won't matter too much for most careers. However, Warwick is becoming increasingly well-respected for Economics, so it may be a valuable degree to have in the future. For postgraduate study it shouldn't matter - just focus on getting a high 2:1 or 1st.
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    Warwick will be more ''''''''''''prestigious''''''''' ''' for Econ, but really the difference between Warwick and Durham for that course is so tiny that I think the most important factor is what university/location you like the best.

    Unless you want to go into IB. It's no secret that Warwick will give you the advantage.

    If I had my heart absolutely set on IB then I would take Warwick. I wouldn't want to because I think it's a terribly ugly and isolated place, but if I were really that dedicated to IB then I guess I would take it.

    Maybe.

    How important is IB for you?
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    How important is IB for you?
    That's the thing. Not much right but I don't really have my heart set on anything in general. I'm hoping to keep my options open and see where university takes me.

    It's possible that this current lack of actual passion for IB means that I won't get in anyway when up against the hundreds of other applicants who wanted to be bankers from the age of 10.
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    That's the thing. Not much right but I don't really have my heart set on anything in general. I'm hoping to keep my options open and see where university takes me.

    It's possible that this current lack of actual passion for IB means that I won't get in anyway when up against the hundreds of other applicants who wanted to be bankers from the age of 10.
    Unless you're absolutely set on IB, I would take Durham instead of Warwick. Durham is just such a nicer place.

    You could go into IB with Warwick, but tbh do you really want to? When I first heard about IB I was like $_$ but looking into it, it's really a terrible, terrible profession. Especially if you have no real interest in finance.

    http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forum...stment-banking
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Unless you're absolutely set on IB, I would take Durham instead of Warwick. Durham is just such a nicer place.

    You could go into IB with Warwick, but tbh do you really want to? When I first heard about IB I was like $_$ but looking into it, it's really a terrible, terrible profession. Especially if you have no real interest in finance.

    http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/forum...stment-banking
    same thing can be said about law, consulting, politics, journalism.. your career is what you make of it not what some sensationalised piece on the internet has to say about it.

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    Warwick is a target but Durham is a semi-target so still targeted by some banks
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    same thing can be said about law, consulting, politics, journalism.. your career is what you make of it not what some sensationalised piece on the internet has to say about it.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    But it's true that front office IB necessarily has objective things that make it worse than other professions. 100 hour weeks, low pay/hour starting out, boring and repetitive work unbecoming of graduates from top universities who are used to being challenged intellectually (unless tweaking PowerPoints and fiddling with Excel is something you find exciting), cutthroat competition, unbearable pressure, etc. It only gets '''''''''''''exciting''''''''''' '' at the senior levels when you do client interaction.

    Maybe it's bearable if you actually have an interest in finance, but if you don't and you just go into it for the money it's hell. And I'd wager that most of the young wide-eyed top university graduates had never even heard of investment banks before university, they just see the money and go 'Yep, that's for me' without thinking.

    It's true that other professions are not necessarily better. But you can definitely get much sweeter deals elsewhere. You could sacrifice some pay for a little bit of free time and enjoyment in the work. I suppose you could do that in IB if you go for boutiques, but really who does that? If you have an interest in finance then you naturally want to go to the top banks, and if you don't have an interest in finance then by going to a boutique you'd just have less money for the same monotonous work, except a little bit less of it.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    But it's true that front office IB necessarily has objective things that make it worse than other professions. 100 hour weeks, low pay/hour starting out, boring and repetitive work unbecoming of graduates from top universities who are used to being challenged intellectually (unless tweaking PowerPoints and fiddling with Excel is something you find exciting), cutthroat competition, unbearable pressure, etc. It only gets '''''''''''''exciting''''''''''' '' at the senior levels when you do client interaction.

    Maybe it's bearable if you actually have an interest in finance, but if you don't and you just go into it for the money it's hell. And I'd wager that most of the young wide-eyed top university graduates had never even heard of investment banks before university, they just see the money and go 'Yep, that's for me' without thinking.

    It's true that other professions are not necessarily better. But you can definitely get much sweeter deals elsewhere. You could sacrifice some pay for a little bit of free time and enjoyment in the work. I suppose you could do that in IB if you go for boutiques, but really who does that? If you have an interest in finance then you naturally want to go to the top banks, and if you don't have an interest in finance then by going to a boutique you'd just have less money for the same monotonous work, except a little bit less of it.
    front office is not just IBD, so long hours don't apply uniformly. And 100 hour weeks are used as hyperbole when in reality it's maybe a couple bad weeks out of the year and much of that time being downtime.

    truth is any entry level career will suck ass.. whether that is corporate law (word monkey for 70-80+ hours a week), politics (bum kissing, getting lunches, barely getting paid), fashion (no pay, crappy working conditions, barely any real work), generic grad scheme (cog in a wheel, significantly less meaningful work, still treated like an intern).. It will all be terrible in some way shape or form and there is no way of getting around them other than paying your dues.

    Maybe after a few years of working in an environment where you learn a lot through being put through the grinder you'll have access to the cushy, meaningful work that you're alluding to - that's how it's always been. Uni grads having grandiose ideas of what they'll be doing upon graduation will merely just find themselves in for a harsh reality.

    If you like finance but don't want to do banking because of long hours, you go into a finance grad scheme..

    Moral is, there's no point complaining about the bad sides of an entry level job; entry level jobs are meant to suck in some way, shape or form.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    front office is not just IBD, so long hours don't apply uniformly. And 100 hour weeks are used as hyperbole when in reality it's maybe a couple bad weeks out of the year and much of that time being downtime.

    truth is any entry level career will suck ass.. whether that is corporate law (word monkey for 70-80+ hours a week), politics (bum kissing, getting lunches, barely getting paid), fashion (no pay, crappy working conditions, barely any real work), generic grad scheme (cog in a wheel, significantly less meaningful work, still treated like an intern).. It will all be terrible in some way shape or form and there is no way of getting around them other than paying your dues.

    Maybe after a few years of working in an environment where you learn a lot through being put through the grinder you'll have access to the cushy, meaningful work that you're alluding to - that's how it's always been. Uni grads having grandiose ideas of what they'll be doing upon graduation will merely just find themselves in for a harsh reality.

    If you like finance but don't want to do banking because of long hours, you go into a finance grad scheme..

    Moral is, there's no point complaining about the bad sides of an entry level job; entry level jobs are meant to suck in some way, shape or form.

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    But IB sucks ass a lot more than the others, I mean 100 hours are unbearable for most, but I guess the only people that get into IB in the first place are the ones who can handle it and enjoy it
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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    But IB sucks ass a lot more than the others, I mean 100 hours are unbearable for most, but I guess the only people that get into IB in the first place are the ones who can handle it and enjoy it
    eh, it'll suck either way. The hours decrease as you scale the ladder and this 100hrs+ moniker people have stuck on to IBD isn't really representative of the truth. Hours vary by group, by bank, by time of the year etc
 
 
 
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