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    "The level on the high concentrated side will fall and the level on the low concentrated side will rise"
    Is this true ^^

    Additionally, how does osmosis make the larger particles go through the partially permeable membrane. And if this does not happen why does osmosis occur so how will making the concentration same on both sides allow the larger particles to diffuse through. Or by making the concentrations the same it allows the water molecules to diffuse through?? Quite confused if you cant already tell...
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    Finally, how does the water level rise and decrease on either sides?

    Can someone please help, need to know this urgently !
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    Osmosis is the net movement of a solvent.
    From an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.
    Down a concentration gradient
    and through a partially permeable membrane.
    "The level on the high concentrated side will fall and the level on the low concentrated side will rise"
    True, also depending on the differences within the gradients, osmosis will occur faster if there's a bigger difference.
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    (Original post by Abusive)
    Osmosis is the net movement of a solvent.
    From an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.
    Down a concentration gradient
    and through a partially permeable membrane.
    "The level on the high concentrated side will fall and the level on the low concentrated side will rise"
    True, also depending on the differences within the gradients, osmosis will occur faster if there's a bigger difference.
    But how does the levels fall and rise on either sides of the membrane? Do some particles move from one side to the other? And why does the concentrations have to be balanced, what will they allow to happen??!!
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    (Original post by Abusive)
    Osmosis is the net movement of a solvent.
    From an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.
    Down a concentration gradient
    and through a partially permeable membrane.
    "The level on the high concentrated side will fall and the level on the low concentrated side will rise"
    True, also depending on the differences within the gradients, osmosis will occur faster if there's a bigger difference.
    On BBC BItesize it says
    " Eventually the level on the more concentrated side of the membrane rises, while the one on the less concentrated side falls"
    Isn't that the opposite to what I said ??
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    On BBC BItesize it says
    " Eventually the level on the more concentrated side of the membrane rises, while the one on the less concentrated side falls"
    Isn't that the opposite to what I said ??
    This is what it says on bitesize "Osmosis is the movement of water from a high water concentration to a low water concentration through a partially permeable membrane. Osmosis takes place in all living cells."
    It's definitely from a high concentration to a low concentration. Active transport however which is something else you'll learn about later goes from a low concentration to a high concentration, it requires energy and is against the concentration gradient too.
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    But how does the levels fall and rise on either sides of the membrane? Do some particles move from one side to the other? And why does the concentrations have to be balanced, what will they allow to happen??!!
    Levels change because paticles are moving. That's what Osmosis is - movement of water particles. Even when the levels are balanced, particles are still moving, that's what they do, it's just that there is no net (overall) movement
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    But how does the levels fall and rise on either sides of the membrane? Do some particles move from one side to the other? And why does the concentrations have to be balanced, what will they allow to happen??!!
    It needs to be balanced, because if there is too little water in a cell, it will shrivel and die, and if there is too much water it becomes turgid and can burst.
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    (Original post by lizzieerobinson)
    Levels change because paticles are moving. That's what Osmosis is - movement of water particles. Even when the levels are balanced, particles are still moving, that's what they do, it's just that there is no net (overall) movement
    Ohhh okay thank you.

    So particles move and thats how they get through the membrane by the levels changing??
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    (Original post by lizzieerobinson)
    It needs to be balanced, because if there is too little water in a cell, it will shrivel and die, and if there is too much water it becomes turgid and can burst.
    Oh okayy thank you so much! That finally answers my question!!
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Ohhh okay thank you.

    So particles move and thats how they get through the membrane by the levels changing??
    Yes, the particles move and so the levels change. When the levels are balanced, particles can still move but the levels remain equal.
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    (Original post by lizzieerobinson)
    Yes, the particles move and so the levels change. When the levels are balanced, particles can still move but the levels remain equal.
    Thank you very much for the help!!
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Thank you very much for the help!!
    Also an additional thing animal cells don't become turgid because they don't have a cell wall, they swell and then burst. So if there's ever a question about an animal living in salt water and they decrease the salt concentration so the animal dies. This is most likely why. There's also 3 types of solution, hypertonic, hypotonic and isotonic. I'll have to find my notes to explain that though, because I forgot D:
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    (Original post by Abusive)
    Also an additional thing animal cells don't become turgid because they don't have a cell wall, they swell and then burst. So if there's ever a question about an animal living in salt water and they decrease the salt concentration so the animal dies. This is most likely why. There's also 3 types of solution, hypertonic, hypotonic and isotonic. I'll have to find my notes to explain that though, because I forgot D:
    Oh alright thank you!!
    And its fine about the solutions because we have different exam boards so that is not in my specification
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Oh alright thank you!!
    And its fine about the solutions because we have different exam boards so that is not in my specification
    Okay
 
 
 
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