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Your favourite defining moment of history? Watch

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    DEFINITELY the burning of Alexandria Library. Gaaah, think of all the knowledge we could have had so much earlier and think how different our history would be if not for that. Still makes me sad to think about to the day.
    /history nerding done
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    The battle of Waterloo. But it is so hard to choose, I love the Napoleonic era and colonialism and the industrial revolution it is all so fascinating
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    (Original post by Connor27)
    August 1789: the french national constituent assembly passes into law the declaration of the rights of man and the citizen.

    Pretty much established the fundamental ideas of liberal democracy that were built on and created the peaceful, idyllic society that we have today.
    And was followed, near immediately, by years of violence.
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    DEFINITELY the burning of Alexandria Library. Gaaah, think of all the knowledge we could have had so much earlier and think how different our history would be if not for that. Still makes me sad to think about to the day.
    /history nerding done
    Thanks, now I'm off to sob at the loss. :cry2:

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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    DEFINITELY the burning of Alexandria Library. Gaaah, think of all the knowledge we could have had so much earlier and think how different our history would be if not for that. Still makes me sad to think about to the day.
    /history nerding done
    Probably just a giant 18 volume history of Egypt dealing with the building of the pyramids or something. Nothing to worry about.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Thanks, now I'm off to sob at the loss. :cry2:

    Take solace in the fact we got some of them back! Like...physics knowledge I think.

    Yeah okay it's still sad. ;-;
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    (Original post by DonaldTrump12)
    Probably just a giant 18 volume history of Egypt dealing with the building of the pyramids or something. Nothing to worry about.
    http://www.sparknotes.com/mindhut/20...-of-alexandria

    I have literally no clue of the validity of this, but if any of it's true, I'd be wishing all we lost were pyramid volumes.
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    (Original post by SkyRees)
    Take solace in the fact we got some of them back! Like...physics knowledge I think.

    Yeah okay it's still sad. ;-;
    Physics, ew
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Physics, ew
    Look it's not for me either, but I do appreciate knowing the earth isn't flat and the Sun doesn't orbit us. People died at the stake for this when we could've known it in early ADs.
    #justice4copernicus
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      (Original post by Connor27)
      A certainly honourable cause that I respect, but to say half the world wouldn't necessarily be true; women in countries like Saudi Arabia, Iran and places like that haven't benefitted from the feminist movement yet, Iran in particular being a patriarchal theocracy.

      I do admire the feminist movement though and would describe myself as a liberal feminist (to disassociate myself with the radical and cultural feminists that can be quite odious at times.)
      :lol: Ok. read a buzzfeed article didya?


      (Original post by claireestelle)
      28 September 1928
      When flemming discovered penicillin
      and then the whole catastrophe of antibiotic resistance. a lecture i recently went to highlighted it. it's getting harder and harder to find antibiotics to treat the modern era's superbugs. all caused by overprescribing, overusing and improper use in general scary thing is, iirc fleming predicted this would happen.

      Mine would be the creation of the Cyrillic Alphabet, in the 9th Century A.D. purely because, 252 million people worldwide us an alphabet created to bring religion and love to Europe.

      It is believed that two brothers, St Cyrill and Methodius, translated Greek Holy texts to a pre Slavic cursor (Glagolitic) which evolved into what is now the present day Cyrillic Alphabet. Particularly proud because it originated from Bulgaria- or what was then part of Bulgarian lands. It's definitely interesting to see the look on peoples faces when they're told it's not the Russian Alphabet. The russians stole it from us! :lol:
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      (Original post by SkyRees)
      Look it's not for me either, but I do appreciate knowing the earth isn't flat and the Sun doesn't orbit us. People died at the stake for this when we could've known it in early ADs.
      #justice4copernicus
      Pfft, I know, but still.
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      1989 fall of the Berlin wall / Soviet communism in Eastern Europe
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      (Original post by Airmed)



      History has its moments, right?



      From the declaration of war on Germany on the 4th August 1914 to Martin Luther King's I Have a Dream speech delivered on the 28th August 1963, there have been many instances that have defined history.

      My own personal favourite would have to be the 5th October 1968, Derry, N.Ireland. A N.Irish Civil Rights march organised by the Northern Irish Civil Rights Association (NICRA) ended up in chaos when the RUC were ordered to disperse the march. What makes this so defining to me is that the scenes were caught on camera and broadcasted on television around the world. It was so shocking to see the disturbances, that this march forced the British government to take more active involvement in N.Ireland and the running of it.

      More information on the NICRA march can be found here.

      So what's your defining moment of history? What really stands out for you?
      14/03/1879
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      (Original post by SkyRees)
      Look it's not for me either, but I do appreciate knowing the earth isn't flat and the Sun doesn't orbit us. People died at the stake for this when we could've known it in early ADs.
      #justice4copernicus
      Iirc heliocentric models did exist quite a long time if only as speculation, the main issue was no one had bothered to come up with a great theoretical explanation for it, and the Church did not like any challenges to its theological doctrine as it undermined their political power. Considering this was the age of humors (medicine) and four causes (physics) I express a little skepticism of any heliocentric model presented by an ancient thinker, and that's no disrespect there's a reason it took so long to do exactly that, it's not as easy as it looks.
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      (Original post by Maths is Life)
      14/03/1879
      Einstein!
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      (Original post by homeland.lsw)
      :lol: Ok. read a buzzfeed article didya?




      and then the whole catastrophe of antibiotic resistance. a lecture i recently went to highlighted it. it's getting harder and harder to find antibiotics to treat the modern era's superbugs. all caused by overprescribing, overusing and improper use in general scary thing is, iirc fleming predicted this would happen.

      Mine would be the creation of the Cyrillic Alphabet, in the 9th Century A.D. purely because, 252 million people worldwide us an alphabet created to bring religion and love to Europe.

      It is believed that two brothers, St Cyrill and Methodius, translated Greek Holy texts to a pre Slavic cursor (Glagolitic) which evolved into what is now the present day Cyrillic Alphabet. Particularly proud because it originated from Bulgaria- or what was then part of Bulgarian lands. It's definitely interesting to see the look on peoples faces when they're told it's not the Russian Alphabet. The russians stole it from us! :lol:
      Wait, what? Are you actually denying that Iran is a patriarchal theocracy?

      Patriarchal: government, rule, or domination by men, as in a family or tribe Origin of patriarchy Classical Greek patriarchia: see patriarch

      Theocracy: A system of government in which priests rule in the name of God or a god: ‘his ambition is to lead a worldwide theocracy’ [mass noun] ‘it is a society just emerging from theocracy’

      Example sentences:

      ‘Iran has made the transition in the last twenty years from a nominal constitutional monarchy to a patriarchal theocracy.’

      That's literally from the Oxford English Dictionary...

      If you knew anything about my political views you'd know I'm far from a rabid buzzfeed watching leftist, that doesn't mean I can't recognise the value and virtue of feminism, particularly liberal, moderate feminism.

      Nutters like you give the right a bad name...
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      (Original post by homeland.lsw)
      and then the whole catastrophe of antibiotic resistance. a lecture i recently went to highlighted it. it's getting harder and harder to find antibiotics to treat the modern era's superbugs. all caused by overprescribing, overusing and improper use in general scary thing is, iirc fleming predicted this would happen.
      It is quite scary, there will come a point where scientists stop being able to create new types of antibiotics and that the deaths because of resistance will increase.
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      (Original post by DonaldTrump12)
      Iirc heliocentric models did exist quite a long time if only as speculation, the main issue was no one had bothered to come up with a great theoretical explanation for it, and the Church did not like any challenges to its theological doctrine as it undermined their political power. Considering this was the age of humors (medicine) and four causes (physics) I express a little skepticism of any heliocentric model presented by an ancient thinker, and that's no disrespect there's a reason it took so long to do exactly that, it's not as easy as it looks.
      I wouldn't be too surprised either, but of course there's no way to tell. I mean, if the very idea of heliocentrism was in society and at least considered known ancient knowledge, there might not have been the same stigma about it by the age of Church rule even if the heliocentric model was shaky and/or poor.
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      (Original post by Connor27)
      Wait, what? Are you actually denying that Iran is a patriarchal theocracy?

      Patriarchal: government, rule, or domination by men, as in a family or tribe Origin of patriarchy Classical Greek patriarchia: see patriarch

      Theocracy: A system of government in which priests rule in the name of God or a god: ‘his ambition is to lead a worldwide theocracy’ [mass noun] ‘it is a society just emerging from theocracy’

      Example sentences:

      ‘Iran has made the transition in the last twenty years from a nominal constitutional monarchy to a patriarchal theocracy.’

      That's literally from the Oxford English Dictionary...

      If you knew anything about my political views you'd know I'm far from a rabid buzzfeed watching leftist, that doesn't mean I can't recognise the value and virtue of feminism, particularly liberal, moderate feminism.
      Play nice, no calling anybody a 'nutter'.:unimpressed:
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      (Original post by Airmed)
      Play nice, no calling anybody a 'nutter'.:unimpressed:
      Eh, fair enough, was an absolute bizarre claim though...

      Post-Truthism is one of the few things that legit triggers me I'll be honest.
     
     
     
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