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    I dont know if its just me thats noticed over the years when trying to organise interviews for new jobs whilst currently employed.
    But ive noticed how some employers (not all) seem to have very limited options when it comes to inviting you for interviews. I understand that they have some limitations and have to do interviews during certain times (depending on where it is) such as opening times etc, but some places seem to have very limited options, which can sometimes make it impossible to attend if you are already working. Ive had a couple of interviews in the past that ive had to turn down due to me not being able to attend due to the availability of interview times.
    Dont get me wrong- some have been great- a nursery i went for an interview at last week had interview times on various days/times to choose from, so it was easy to organise a suitable time. Some places need to be more like that. But its not always possible to swap shifts/get time off work/whatever to attend interviews.
    Has anyone else noticed this?
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    I dont know if its just me thats noticed over the years when trying to organise interviews for new jobs whilst currently employed.
    But ive noticed how some employers (not all) seem to have very limited options when it comes to inviting you for interviews. I understand that they have some limitations and have to do interviews during certain times (depending on where it is) such as opening times etc, but some places seem to have very limited options, which can sometimes make it impossible to attend if you are already working. Ive had a couple of interviews in the past that ive had to turn down due to me not being able to attend due to the availability of interview times.
    Dont get me wrong- some have been great- a nursery i went for an interview at last week had interview times on various days/times to choose from, so it was easy to organise a suitable time. Some places need to be more like that. But its not always possible to swap shifts/get time off work/whatever to attend interviews.
    Has anyone else noticed this?
    I know what you mean, but companies do have to schedule interview slots around their normal business activities, so the available times have to necessarily be fairly limited. If I were serious about the job I was being interviewed for, I would probably throw a sickie at my current employer - but only if there was a high chance of me accepting the job, so the time it would be scheduled would be somewhat irrelevant.
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    Let's say a minimum of 2 people are involved in the decision making process for the interview. Person one only works 12-6 Monday to Thursday and person two only works Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

    All of a sudden the interview times are limited to 12 hours a week, and that's not even factoring in regular commitments they already have for their job before they even think about a recruitment process. And then they have to interview multiple candidates.

    It might seem inflexible at your end, but undoubtedly they have made it as flexible as they can given their recruitment timeframes and commitments. There is little reason for a potential employer to limit their potential talent pool by being really restrictive when they interview, but at the same time they need an efficient process (i.e. If they drag the recruitment process out they might lose people they want to recruit to competitors) and one that fits around their day job.


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    M1011 What are your thoughts on this?
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    I dont know if its just me thats noticed over the years when trying to organise interviews for new jobs whilst currently employed.
    But ive noticed how some employers (not all) seem to have very limited options when it comes to inviting you for interviews. I understand that they have some limitations and have to do interviews during certain times (depending on where it is) such as opening times etc, but some places seem to have very limited options, which can sometimes make it impossible to attend if you are already working. Ive had a couple of interviews in the past that ive had to turn down due to me not being able to attend due to the availability of interview times.
    Dont get me wrong- some have been great- a nursery i went for an interview at last week had interview times on various days/times to choose from, so it was easy to organise a suitable time. Some places need to be more like that. But its not always possible to swap shifts/get time off work/whatever to attend interviews.
    Has anyone else noticed this?
    I used to hold interviews for the Company Directors where I previously worked. I would interview the candidates during my working hours (9-5), but in a couple of cases where a couple of candidate was currently employed, they would have to do it outside of these hours. I asked the Directors of such situations and they didn't mind one bit holding the interviews themselves after office hours; so I guess it just depends on the company and how understanding, flexible and lenient they are. Personally for me, I had to miss opportunities simply because the employers weren't flexible just because I was currently in work and that I wasn't flexible like the other candidates (who maybe unemployed and in a part time job). :confused::dontknow:

    However on the other hand, my 2 previous employers interviewed me outside of my working hours; so like I mentioned before, just depends on the employer themselves.
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    In some ways I use it as an indicator of that employer. In one case I got invited to an interview less than 2 full working days before the actual interview day, by which time I of course could not take any time off work (normally for interviews I'm willing to use up my annual leave allowance). And they didn't offer me any flexibility at all. I understand that they need to have a limited time scale to conduct interviews in but I thought that this was particularly inconsiderate and made me not want to work for them. On the other hand, I've had employers give me plenty of notice (or at least, tell me what dates the interview will be on before confirmation of that stage just in case) or flexibility - and I feel as though these employers will also be the ones that are the most understanding and considerate to be managed by/work with if I was to get the role there. Not sure if this in any way holds true but it does put me off an employer if they are inconsiderate about interviews and I think employers should keep that in mind more than they currently do - that they might push away some people who are the best for the job simply because they couldn't get time off work to attend a last minute interview.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    M1011 What are your thoughts on this?
    I imagine it's down to the companies desire to get that candidate in for interview. If candidates are a dime a dozen then they can be inflexible. If candidates are rare and of high value to the company, they may go out of their way.

    So long as the company is offering some flexibility (e.g. giving you a few options) I think it's reasonable. I don't think the company should be expected to rearrange their schedule around the applicant, if OP wants the job then he ultimately has to show some commitment (aka take a day off).
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    It is the candidates that need to be flexible, not the employers.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    I imagine it's down to the companies desire to get that candidate in for interview. If candidates are a dime a dozen then they can be inflexible. If candidates are rare and of high value to the company, they may go out of their way.

    So long as the company is offering some flexibility (e.g. giving you a few options) I think it's reasonable. I don't think the company should be expected to rearrange their schedule around the applicant, if OP wants the job then he ultimately has to show some commitment (aka take a day off).
    Also one thing I have forgotten to mention is that some employers (not all) are starting to phase in video interviews, so candidates wouldn't need to worry about having to book a day off.
    I've recently had 3 video interviews myself and to me, it seems like a strange and awkward experience in my opinion because I'm not actually talking to the employer/interviewer face to face and I would never get to know their facial expressions when I'm giving out the answers.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    Also one thing I have forgotten to mention is that some employers (not all) are starting to phase in video interviews, so candidates wouldn't need to worry about having to book a day off.
    I've recently had 3 video interviews myself and to me, it seems like a strange and awkward experience in my opinion because I'm not actually talking to the employer/interviewer face to face and I would never get to know their facial expressions when I'm giving out the answers.
    Some huge advantages to it though - you get to see far more applicants and listen to how they express their motivation, thoughts etc.

    Otherwise you have to make much more of a crude cut at the application stage based on some kind of evidence - usually whether they have work experience or a particular set of academics (or both), or even something far more crude like a typo.

    In a day and age where your CV/application form can easily be written for you, a video interview is more likely to be a more valid assessment too.

    But I completely understand the awkwardness point. With practice, people get less worried about that though.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Some huge advantages to it though - you get to see far more applicants and listen to how they express their motivation, thoughts etc.

    Otherwise you have to make much more of a crude cut at the application stage based on some kind of evidence - usually whether they have work experience or a particular set of academics (or both), or even something far more crude like a typo.

    In a day and age where your CV/application form can easily be written for you, a video interview is more likely to be a more valid assessment too.

    But I completely understand the awkwardness point. With practice, people get less worried about that though.
    I completely agree but also I've noticed that not all employers ask for qualification certificates to justify that. Do you know why that is? For all they know I might be lying just to get the job. :confused:
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    I completely agree but also I've noticed that not all employers ask for qualification certificates to justify that. Do you know why that is? For all they know I might be lying just to get the job. :confused:
    They usually ask for documentation of your certificates/qualifications at the point of offer/reference checks. If you lied it would be picked up then.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    They usually ask for documentation of your certificates/qualifications at the point of offer/reference checks. If you lied it would be picked up then.
    That is strange; I've never been asked for my qualification certificates even at the point of offer and reference checks being made! :curious:
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    (Original post by Len Goodman)
    It is the candidates that need to be flexible, not the employers.
    I understand that the candidates need to be flexible and try if at all possible to attend the interview options given.
    But at the same time, employers need to be slightly flexible in this too. Not everyone can swap shifts/get the day off work, especially at short notice. At least if the employer either offered a few different interview times or gave a reasonable amount of notice, then the candidate could try their hardest to get to an interview time thats suitable for both parties.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    That is strange; I've never been asked for my qualification certificates even at the point of offer and reference checks being made! :curious:
    Then they don't really care whether you have the qualifications or not, OR just trust their employees implicitly.
 
 
 
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