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    Public Health England have released guidance about 'carcinogenic' acrylamide formation in carbohydrate-rich foods cooked at high temperatures:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38680622

    What do we think of this? Is it another example of the nanny state gone mad - pretty much every major food group has now the finger pointed at it for causing cancer and this new scare risks turning people off all health eating and lifestyle messages. Or is it just PHE applying the precautionary principle and they're rather stuck between a rock and a hard place?
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Public Health England have released guidance about 'carcinogenic' acrylamide formation in carbohydrate-rich foods cooked at high temperatures:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38680622

    What do we think of this? Is it another example of the nanny state gone mad - pretty much every major food group has now the finger pointed at it for causing cancer and this new scare risks turning people off all health eating and lifestyle messages. Or is it just PHE applying the precautionary principle and they're rather stuck between a rock and a hard place?
    The claim that the animalistic act of eating burnt toast contributes to your risk of getting cancer is absolutely laughable, especially considering the percentage of said risk was so minuscule. Therefore the T.V's and radio's that most people will have heard this information from, ironically will have increased their cancer chances more through radiation.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Public Health England have released guidance about 'carcinogenic' acrylamide formation in carbohydrate-rich foods cooked at high temperatures:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38680622

    What do we think of this? Is it another example of the nanny state gone mad - pretty much every major food group has now the finger pointed at it for causing cancer and this new scare risks turning people off all health eating and lifestyle messages. Or is it just PHE applying the precautionary principle and they're rather stuck between a rock and a hard place?
    It's a shame the NHS seems to have withdrawn this useful tool:
    http://crabsalloverhealth.blogspot.c...s-of-risk.html


    I wonder how tiny the blob would be for toast.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's a shame the NHS seems to have withdrawn this useful tool:
    http://crabsalloverhealth.blogspot.c...s-of-risk.html


    I wonder how tiny the blob would be for toast.
    Yes, these are very good infographics - there used to be one for the various harms of different drugs (including alcohol) which showed just how massively harmful heroin was compared to everything else (I think it had an axis of +4 or something).
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    are we still allowed to called sliced toast soldiers or is that no longer PC ?
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    Not burnt, but I'm at higher risk of cancer anyway, so **** it, I'm enjoying myself.
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    Given the likely small risk, it seems misguided use of resources.

    They really should let me do Public Health England campaigns rather than this. "Oi! Fatties, not only are you increasing your risk of dying from bowel cancer but your family will face the indignity of burying you in an extra large coffin. Now lay off that sodding cake and go for a walk." would be more effective for the nation's wellbeing than don't burn your toast.
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    Too much facepalming today, this acrylamide thing has been going on for years. This is literally scaremongering and they really should be focusing on other things like suggesting people avoid high sugar fizzy drinks for instance. There are carcinogens all round us, acrylamide is considered one sure, but when you look at the studies in rodents the amount of the compound they were being fed per kg of bodyweight was so much higher than your daily exposure would ever be, I can't remember now but literally we're talking you having to eat 10kg of deep fried chips or hundreds of slices of "burnt" toast in a day to match it. Most chemicals at those sort of levels would **** you up, eat 1000g of sugar a day and I can proof sugar kills.

    Heavy metals like mercury are known to be toxic and cancerous..you get them in say tuna, but you don't see them banning it's consumption, just a suggestion to limit in-take. Just had a look and due to a potential lawsuit multiple international crisp brands made sure acrylamide content was below 275 parts per billion...that's absolutely minuscule. I think the cholesterol from eating enough fried/overcooked starchy foods to cause any acrylamide issues would kill you first.
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    I thought this was common knowledge?

    (Well, not specific to carbohydrate but cooking foods at higher temperatures, i.e. grilling on a BBQ)
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    I cremated it.
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    Funnily enough yes - think the toaster broke actually, yesterday it loooked like it was about to catch fire.
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    is there anything that won't cause cancer now?
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    With air pollution genetics, meats, radiation levels, etc. Will a slice of burnt toast really make a difference to my possibility of getting cancer? Probably not so oh well
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Public Health England have released guidance about 'carcinogenic' acrylamide formation in carbohydrate-rich foods cooked at high temperatures:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38680622

    What do we think of this? Is it another example of the nanny state gone mad - pretty much every major food group has now the finger pointed at it for causing cancer and this new scare risks turning people off all health eating and lifestyle messages. Or is it just PHE applying the precautionary principle and they're rather stuck between a rock and a hard place?
    acrylamide is produced by the unstable fats combined with protein.
    for example, sunflower oil, peanut oil, margarine, canola oil, vegetable oil, soybean oil,
    grapeseed oil, corn oil, etc

    If you used coconut oil, it would not produce acrylamide.

    Now many people in the UK use it though.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I thought this was common knowledge?

    (Well, not specific to carbohydrate but cooking foods at higher temperatures, i.e. grilling on a BBQ)
    acrylamide is produced by the unstable fats combined with protein.
    for example, sunflower oil, peanut oil, margarine, canola oil, vegetable oil, soybean oil,
    grapeseed oil, corn oil, etc

    if you cook in coconut oil, it won't produce acrylamide.

    most commercial breads have added oils to them
 
 
 
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