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Parents being unsupportive of my decisions:( Watch

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    This is quite long, but please give me some advice!!!

    My parents and I both have very different views in terms of how important education is. They both went straight into work after they finished secondary school, and have been working since.
    After I finished secondary school, I decided to continue my education by studying A-levels. I aspire to do a doctorate one day. I am currently in Year 13 and felt pressured by my family, who kept frequently making snide remarks that I'm not earning my own income, to get a job.
    This job makes me work ridiculously long hours (11 hours per day) even though I'm only 17. They want me to work all weekend, every weekend.
    As a result, I have failed my mock exams because I didn't have enough time to revise properly. Usually, I am a straight-A student.
    I received a text from work today asking me if I can work all the weekends for the next month, and that has been the turning point for me.

    Therefore, I emailed my workplace telling them that I have decided to resign so that I can prioritise my studies. They have not replied yet.
    When I told my mum earlier that I'm resigning, she wasn't happy at all and basically said I should be earning my own income and that her and my dad were both "brought up to WORK". My dad's reaction will be even worse because he just yells over the top of me and doesn't listen to me.

    They don't seem to understand the extent to which this job is causing me to fall behind at sixth form. They think work is more important than education. I am just a financial burden to them.

    Any advice? I feel so upset right now.
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    What kind of jobs do your parents have?

    It's weird because my parents had the complete opposite attitude to yours; they wouldn't let me get a job because it may have affected my schoolwork. My parents were both blue collar workers and they wanted me to do "better" than that. Maybe you need to sit your parents down and explain that going to uni and getting a doctorate eventually will likely give you much better prospects in life than leaving school and getting a job where ever possible. However, this would depend on the kind of jobs they have.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    This is quite long, but please give me some advice!!!

    My parents and I both have very different views in terms of how important education is. They both went straight into work after they finished secondary school, and have been working since.
    After I finished secondary school, I decided to continue my education by studying A-levels. I aspire to do a doctorate one day. I am currently in Year 13 and felt pressured by my family, who kept frequently making snide remarks that I'm not earning my own income, to get a job.
    This job makes me work ridiculously long hours (11 hours per day) even though I'm only 17. They want me to work all weekend, every weekend.
    As a result, I have failed my mock exams because I didn't have enough time to revise properly. Usually, I am a straight-A student.
    I received a text from work today asking me if I can work all the weekends for the next month, and that has been the turning point for me.

    Therefore, I emailed my workplace telling them that I have decided to resign so that I can prioritise my studies. They have not replied yet.
    When I told my mum earlier that I'm resigning, she wasn't happy at all and basically said I should be earning my own income and that her and my dad were both "brought up to WORK". My dad's reaction will be even worse because he just yells over the top of me and doesn't listen to me.

    They don't seem to understand the extent to which this job is causing me to fall behind at sixth form. They think work is more important than education. I am just a financial burden to them.

    Any advice? I feel so upset right now.
    You must do your best to try and reason with them. Although, from the sound of it, that would not be likely to help much, you would do your duty in trying to reason with them.

    If that doesn't help, your only alternative would be to power through it and go to uni. As a British citizen, which I'm guessing you are, you should be entitled to both tuition fee and maintenance loans at university (unless there's been any change in that recently?).

    Likewise, you could try and explain your situation to your school. Perhaps a welfare officer or just head of year/head of sixth form. If you managed to get anyone from the upper hierarchy (headmaster, head of sixth form, head of year) to write a letter or try and have a talk with your parents you'd be in a FAR better position.

    ^ I'd say that would be your best bet. Get your school involved in some way. It is likely that your parents will be at least partially pacified by people of authority (higher up teachers) explaining the advantages of proper education. Perhaps have some teachers praise your academic prowess and how work has affected you.
 
 
 
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