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    (Original post by LisaNikita)
    Apparently there are more people in colleges studying law then there are actual jobs. Is this true?
    Yes, that's true. There are plenty of people who will graduate with a law degree but never get a job as a solicitor or barrister. It hardly follows from that that law is a useless degree; for the people who get the degree then go onto practice law clearly it isn't a useless degree.

    It's also a rather low-rent and superficial view of a law degree to perceive it as, basically, a vocational course to get a job. An undergraduate degree teaches you how to think, how to analyse, how to research... whether it's a law degree or an English degree or a history degree, they're all essentially pushing in the same direction.
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    (Original post by RosyPearl)
    I know a law graduate who went to study nursing because the job prospects isn't great.
    what uni did your mate go to
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    (Original post by Blancosdos)
    what uni did your mate go to
    For law or nursing ?
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    (Original post by RosyPearl)
    For law or nursing ?
    law
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    (Original post by Blancosdos)
    law
    Birmingham City
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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    Jesus christ the Oxbridge circle jerking on this forum is unbearable. If you think it's a golden ticket to becoming the prime minister or a Supreme Court Judge you have another thing coming. Any top Russell Group will get you into any of the top London firms, period. A 1st from a top Russell group will, in almost every instance, be looked upon more favorably than a 2:1 from Oxbridge - a 1st in law is a fantastic achievement. As I mentioned earlier, the commercial bar is admittedly dominated by Oxbridge (top few chambers in the country). However, if you look at the profiles of the barristers, not only did they attend Oxbridge, they often came in the top handful of students in their year. A 2:1 from Oxbridge will not get you into the commercial bar, you have a better chance with a 1st from a top Russell Group.

    Please, you are going to convince people that Oxbridge is the be all and end all - it's not. Sure, it gives you an advantage, but if you look at stats, Oxbridge (individually Oxford and Cambridge) have about a 3% lead over Durham in the number of graduates given training contracts - wow, incredible. Even more important, which I haven't mentioned, is extracurriculars. I should also point out that even if you read many law firm partners are Oxbridge graduates, it's not some meritocratic system where the comprehensive school kid succeeds and goes on to Oxbridge, and then walks into the position of partner - you will find many partners are educated at a small handful of top private schools. It's the elite social bubble which gives you the advantage, not Oxbridge. Feel free to disagree, but this is the truth. There will, of course, be state educated partners, but they are in the minority. Britain is a class ridden society.
    I actually completely agree with you. As I said, you should go study what you enjoy, no matter where. Don't base it solely on career prospects and presige.
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    (Original post by RosyPearl)
    Birmingham City
    That explains it.
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    it's only useless if you don't use it
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    These two graphs will help shed some light on the subject of your question. They are from a government report from 2015...Law is a pretty bad choice so far as earnings and employment prospects are concerned relative to other subjects. Its not as bad as going for something like Art or Music though ...those guys earn less after five years from graduating than supermarket clerks ....

    Earnings after 5 years of graduation by subject studied at university:

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    Employment after 5 years by subject studied:

    Attachment 614846614848
    Attached Images
     
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    These two graphs will help shed some light on the subject of your question. They are from a government report from 2015...Law is a pretty bad choice so far as earnings and employment prospects are concerned relative to other subjects. Its not as bad as going for something like Art or Music though ...those guys earn less after five years from graduating than supermarket clerks ....

    Earnings after 5 years of graduation by subject studied at university:

    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-01-27 at 23.14.57.png
Views: 51
Size:  226.9 KB

    Employment after 5 years by subject studied:

    Attachment 614846614848

    I think you have to make distinction though. Because of the large number of Universities that offer law, the average is likely to be dragged down by the people who went to bad Universities.

    If you look at the statistics for people who graduated from RG/Top 25-ish Universities then they are likely to be more positive.

    As long as you study law at a well-respected institution, you will have a brilliant degree under your belt, and can go into whichever high-paying professions you like (with hard work and experience of course).
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    (Original post by PostGrad221)
    I think you have to make distinction though. Because of the large number of Universities that offer law, the average is likely to be dragged down by the people who went to bad Universities.

    If you look at the statistics for people who graduated from RG/Top 25-ish Universities then they are likely to be more positive.

    As long as you study law at a well-respected institution, you will have a brilliant degree under your belt, and can go into whichever high-paying professions you like (with hard work and experience of course).
    People who graduate from top universities do better in life not because they graduated from top universities but because they usually work much much much much much harder than those students who graduate from universities that are not so good. These people are a minority and they are not representative of the average law graduate. So them doing better doesn't really tell you anything. In any field if you work harder you are more likely to succeed but if we measured success by earning power and job prospects, on average, you are greatly less likely to succeed in law than you are in medicine.

    Look at the upper quartile for earnings for Law graduates in the first graph and compare it to the lower quartile for graduates of medicine...Its half the lowest earnings for medical students....The highest you could possibly earn, after 5 years from graduating, as a law graduate, is half that of the lowest income for a medical student....
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    my post is back up now so whoever reported it try again loser
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    The highest you could possibly earn, after 5 years from graduating, as a law graduate, is half that of the lowest income for a medical student....
    Law graduates working at top firms can earn into 6 figures 5 years after graduation, so that is complete rubbish. Newly qualified salaries at multiple American firms is in excess of 100,000, and for other top London firms ~80,000. What you just said is therefore completely inaccurate. Even smaller London firms pay ~60,000 to NQs, and I'm pretty sure that's more than medical students with the same years of experience (not entirely sure about this, though). The average medical student will earn more than the average law student, however, the top law students will earn more than the average (and best) medical students - dependent on where they practice law, of course.
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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    Law graduates working at top firms can earn into 6 figures 5 years after graduation, so that is complete rubbish. Newly qualified salaries at multiple American firms is in excess of 100,000, and for other top London firms ~80,000. What you just said is therefore completely inaccurate. Even smaller London firms pay ~60,000 to NQs, and I'm pretty sure that's more than medical students with the same years of experience (not entirely sure about this, though). The average medical student will earn more than the average law student, however, the top law students will earn more than the average (and best) medical students - dependent on where they practice law, of course.
    Hi Odd. We are talking about those graphs which are based on a government report into earnings and job prospects for university graduates. If you have an issue with these results and what they show...take it up with the government. Tell the government that the upper quartiles for graduates of law should be in excess of 100k. I'm sure they would change the graphs to accommodate your views.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Look at the upper quartile for earnings for Law graduates in the first graph and compare it to the lower quartile for graduates of medicine...Its half the lowest earnings for medical students....The highest you could possibly earn, after 5 years from graduating, as a law graduate, is half that of the lowest income for a medical student....
    You really have no idea what you're talking about. Junior doctors is in F1 earn about half of what multinational firms offer trainees in year one. Upon qualifying those firms will pay anything up to £120k a year, four times what an article in the Telegraph claimed doctors earn after four years without specialist training.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    Hi Odd. We are talking about those graphs which are based on a government report into earnings and job prospects for university graduates. If you have an issue with these results and what they show...take it up with the government. Tell the government that the upper quarterlies for graduates of law should be in excess of 100k. I'm sure they would change the graphs to accommodate your views.
    I'm sure the data is correct. However, your statement that 'the highest you could possibly earn, after 5 years from graduating, as a law graduate, is half that of the lowest income for a medical student....' is incorrect. It is 'possible' to earn more, and far more, than a medicine graduate 5 years after graduation if you work for a top law firm. Of course, places at firms like this are competitive, but that's beside the point. Your statement was incorrect.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    I'm sure they would change the graphs to accommodate your views.
    They're not his 'views'. They are the facts.


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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    I'm sure the data is correct.
    Given you seem very keen to be as accurate as you can, 'data' are plural...
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Given you seem very keen to be as accurate as you can, 'data' are plural...
    Thanks, that really contributed to the discussion.
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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    Thanks, that really contributed to the discussion.
    About as much as the rest of the wittering on about money did
 
 
 
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