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    I am currently employed on a zero-hour contract but have decided to resign because the hours they are asking me to work each week (22 hours) is interfering with my A-levels.
    I emailed the administrator yesterday telling her that I'm resigning but she hasn't replied yet, even though she usually replies to emails within half an hour.

    I'm going to hand in a physical letter of resignation to the manager at the weekend (although the manager only comes in during the week so I'll have to leave it on her desk) but what do I say about my notice period?
    I have already agreed to work the next two weekends but I don't want to do any more shifts after that.

    Any advice? I'm not really sure what to do, considering i'm on a zero-hour contract and have only been working there for just over two months.

    Thanks
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      (Original post by LeCroissant)
      I am currently employed on a zero-hour contract but have decided to resign because the hours they are asking me to work each week (22 hours) is interfering with my A-levels.
      I emailed the administrator yesterday telling her that I'm resigning but she hasn't replied yet, even though she usually replies to emails within half an hour.

      I'm going to hand in a physical letter of resignation to the manager at the weekend (although the manager only comes in during the week so I'll have to leave it on her desk) but what do I say about my notice period?
      I have already agreed to work the next two weekends but I don't want to do any more shifts after that.

      Any advice? I'm not really sure what to do, considering i'm on a zero-hour contract and have only been working there for just over two months.

      Thanks
      Good morning :sly::hat2:

      If you've given notice, you've given notice. Just make sure the notice you've given is the same as the notice period you're supposed to give (if there is one) and then leave when you say you'll leave.

      If the admin hasn't replied to your email, that's their lookout - you sent it, and so they've got it. If they don't read emails... well, that's their lookout. You've fulfilled your legal obligation.

      Just make sure you're clear for a reference, when you need one.
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      (Original post by LeCroissant)
      I am currently employed on a zero-hour contract but have decided to resign because the hours they are asking me to work each week (22 hours) is interfering with my A-levels.
      I emailed the administrator yesterday telling her that I'm resigning but she hasn't replied yet, even though she usually replies to emails within half an hour.

      I'm going to hand in a physical letter of resignation to the manager at the weekend (although the manager only comes in during the week so I'll have to leave it on her desk) but what do I say about my notice period?
      I have already agreed to work the next two weekends but I don't want to do any more shifts after that.

      Any advice? I'm not really sure what to do, considering i'm on a zero-hour contract and have only been working there for just over two months.

      Thanks
      Depends what the contract says - technically, you shouldn't have a notice period as there are no standard hours, but if you agreed to do two weekends, you might want to do them as a matter of conscience. On the other hand, if you don't need the reference,
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      (Original post by Tootles)
      Good morning :sly::hat2:

      If you've given notice, you've given notice. Just make sure the notice you've given is the same as the notice period you're supposed to give (if there is one) and then leave when you say you'll leave.

      If the admin hasn't replied to your email, that's their lookout - you sent it, and so they've got it. If they don't read emails... well, that's their lookout. You've fulfilled your legal obligation.

      Just make sure you're clear for a reference, when you need one.
      Good afternoon :hello:

      I haven't technically given them any notice, but I have agreed to work the next two weekends so perhaps that can be my notice.

      The admin has most likely read my email but doesn't know how/doesn't want to reply.

      Not quite sure what they'll put in my reference considering I'm literally the only member of office staff in at the weekends. :laugh:
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      (Original post by Trinculo)
      Depends what the contract says - technically, you shouldn't have a notice period as there are no standard hours, but if you agreed to do two weekends, you might want to do them as a matter of conscience. On the other hand, if you don't need the reference,
      Yes I'm definitely going to work the two weekends that I have agreed to work because I don't want to leave on a bad note. It will also be nice to reap in some extra last-minute cash :yes: .
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        (Original post by LeCroissant)
        Good afternoon :hello:

        I haven't technically given them any notice, but I have agreed to work the next two weekends so perhaps that can be my notice.

        The admin has most likely read my email but doesn't know how/doesn't want to reply.

        Not quite sure what they'll put in my reference considering I'm literally the only member of office staff in at the weekends. :laugh:
        Definitely give formal and incontravertible notice, that way your back's covered whatever happens.
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        (Original post by LeCroissant)
        Yes I'm definitely going to work the two weekends that I have agreed to work because I don't want to leave on a bad note. It will also be nice to reap in some extra last-minute cash :yes: .
        I suggest you find someone to hand your notice to other than the desk of your manager who isn't there. If you don't want to leave on a bad note, hand it to someone with authority (or HR), and make a courtesy call to your boss ASAP.

        There is debate about whether an email constitutes formal written notice. Not that it matters, in all likelihood, but check your contract.
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        (Original post by Trinculo)
        Depends what the contract says - technically, you shouldn't have a notice period as there are no standard hours, but if you agreed to do two weekends, you might want to do them as a matter of conscience. On the other hand, if you don't need the reference,
        0 hour contract doesnt mean 0 notice.
        You usually have to ive some form of notice, e.g. 2 weeks or something.
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        (Original post by Trinculo)
        Depends what the contract says - technically, you shouldn't have a notice period as there are no standard hours, but if you agreed to do two weekends, you might want to do them as a matter of conscience. On the other hand, if you don't need the reference,
        Statutory Notice is one week if you have been employed for more than a month and less than 2 years.

        Although it is generally good practice to go by the Contractual Notice period.
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        (Original post by addylad)
        I suggest you find someone to hand your notice to other than the desk of your manager who isn't there. If you don't want to leave on a bad note, hand it to someone with authority (or HR), and make a courtesy call to your boss ASAP.

        There is debate about whether an email constitutes formal written notice. Not that it matters, in all likelihood, but check your contract.
        There is literally no one for me to hand it in to, so I've been told to leave it in the desk so that it can be given to the manager when she comes in :/

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        (Original post by Trinculo)
        Depends what the contract says - technically, you shouldn't have a notice period as there are no standard hours, but if you agreed to do two weekends, you might want to do them as a matter of conscience. On the other hand, if you don't need the reference,
        (Original post by Tootles)
        Definitely give formal and incontravertible notice, that way your back's covered whatever happens.
        (Original post by Emma:-))
        0 hour contract doesnt mean 0 notice.
        You usually have to ive some form of notice, e.g. 2 weeks or something.
        (Original post by Willy Pete)
        Statutory Notice is one week if you have been employed for more than a month and less than 2 years.

        Although it is generally good practice to go by the Contractual Notice period.
        The admin still hasn't replied to my email but my colleague has said that I can leave my letter of resignation in the desk and she will give it to the manager for me.
        Since the manager won't be receiving my letter until tomorrow at the earliest, would it come across badly if I say that my last day there will be on the upcoming Sunday?
        I really don't want to do any more shifts after next weekend because the long hours are horrible and I was hoping that the admin would have at least got back to me.
        Would it be better if I say something along the lines of "my last week here will be the week commencing Monday the 7th February" because at least then, me leaving doesn't seem so rushed and I can always say I am not available to work on that weekend if they ask.

        Thanks

        Croissant.
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          (Original post by LeCroissant)
          The admin still hasn't replied to my email but my colleague has said that I can leave my letter of resignation in the desk and she will give it to the manager for me.
          Since the manager won't be receiving my letter until tomorrow at the earliest, would it come across badly if I say that my last day there will be on the upcoming Sunday?
          I really don't want to do any more shifts after next weekend because the long hours are horrible and I was hoping that the admin would have at least got back to me.
          Would it be better if I say something along the lines of "my last week here will be the week commencing Monday the 7th February" because at least then, me leaving doesn't seem so rushed and I can always say I am not available to work on that weekend if they ask.

          Thanks

          Croissant.
          Strictly speaking, as you're on a zero-hours contract, you're not obliged to accept hours from them.

          If you want to be completely safe, give twenty-eight days as your notice period, but don't accept any work in the meantime - but that's only a formality. You won't be working but your contract won't be terminated until your resignation takes effect, at the end of your notice period.

          I would strongly recommend reading your contract to see what terms you're bound to, though. If you haven't got a copy, your employer is obliged to give you one.
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          (Original post by Tootles)
          Strictly speaking, as you're on a zero-hours contract, you're not obliged to accept hours from them.

          If you want to be completely safe, give twenty-eight days as your notice period, but don't accept any work in the meantime - but that's only a formality. You won't be working but your contract won't be terminated until your resignation takes effect, at the end of your notice period.

          I would strongly recommend reading your contract to see what terms you're bound to, though. If you haven't got a copy, your employer is obliged to give you one.
          Surely it would seem ruder telling them I'll be leaving in four weeks and refusing to work shifts knowing that they are currently understaffed, than being honest and saying I'm leaving in two weeks?

          I have read through my contract and it doesn't say anything about a certain amount of notice I should give.


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            (Original post by LeCroissant)
            Surely it would seem ruder telling them I'll be leaving in four weeks and refusing to work shifts knowing that they are currently understaffed, than being honest and saying I'm leaving in two weeks?

            I have read through my contract and it doesn't say anything about a certain amount of notice I should give.


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            I understand completely what you're saying - but ultimately, you have to think of yourself first in these situations. If you give the reasons you've mentioned here and told me about, they'll understand.
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            (Original post by LeCroissant)
            The admin still hasn't replied to my email but my colleague has said that I can leave my letter of resignation in the desk and she will give it to the manager for me.
            Since the manager won't be receiving my letter until tomorrow at the earliest, would it come across badly if I say that my last day there will be on the upcoming Sunday?
            I really don't want to do any more shifts after next weekend because the long hours are horrible and I was hoping that the admin would have at least got back to me.
            Would it be better if I say something along the lines of "my last week here will be the week commencing Monday the 7th February" because at least then, me leaving doesn't seem so rushed and I can always say I am not available to work on that weekend if they ask.

            Thanks

            Croissant.
            Just give them 2 weeks notice an be done with it. 1 more weekend wont hurt.
            Is there not any way of reducing your hours. You could do that instead of leaving.
           
           
           
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