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    Currently in year 12, I have decided on my choices and course.
    Something I would like to know is when does the application process start and how does it work.

    From my understanding you apply at the start of year 13.
    You fill in your UCAS form and get teachers to put predicted grades and your write your personal statement then submit.

    After you receive a letter or email from the university and they will give you an offer, subjdct to meeting grade requirements.

    My question are:
    Where do the predicted grades come into this, where do the grades come from?
    What are the types of offer can you get?
    What happens if you don't meet predicted grades?
    What happens if you meet predicted grades?

    Also please fill in any blanks I missed.
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    (Original post by Yenson)
    Currently in year 12, I have decided on my choices and course.
    Something I would like to know is when does the application process start and how does it work.

    From my understanding you apply at the start of year 13.
    You fill in your UCAS form and get teachers to put predicted grades and your write your personal statement then submit.

    After you receive a letter or email from the university and they will give you an offer, subjdct to meeting grade requirements.

    My question are:
    Where do the predicted grades come into this, where do the grades come from?
    What are the types of offer can you get?
    What happens if you don't meet predicted grades?
    What happens if you meet predicted grades?

    Also please fill in any blanks I missed.
    You've got the basic idea Applications open usually at the start of September-ish, then close on 15th January (with an earlier deadline for some courses like medicine or Oxbridge). You can apply after this date but universities will usually consider late applications only if they have spaces left after everyone else who applied before the deadline.

    The UCAS form has several sections, most pretty dull like your name, school, etc. and also there's a section for you to fill in all your previously achieved grades (i.e. GCSE grades, and AS grades if you have them) and what subjects you are planning to sit exams for that summer The bit most people stress about is the personal statement, you just have to write max. 4000 characters about why you're interested in the degree course, relevant examples of your interest in the course (e.g. reading relevant books, going to talks about the course, attending a summer school, joining your school subject society, etc.), and a small amount about your other hobbies This all forms part of the UCAS form.

    Once you've done all that, you click "submit" and it gets sent to your school for them to attach a reference (essentially like a big school report, saying why you are a good student etc.) and your predicted grades.

    These predicted grades generally come from your teachers for each subject. They will probably give you an exam at the end of year 12 (if you aren't already taking AS exams) and base your grade on how well you do in these exams/ how well you are performing in class - e.g. if you consistently hand in high quality homework, coursework and class tests. Some schools encourage teachers to be a bit more generous with these predicted grades, since most universities use them to decide whether or not to give you an offer, however you should be wary about asking teachers to predict you unreasonably high grades since you still need to meet your conditional offer from the university. Essentially, think of the predicted grade (and reference) like the progress reports teachers use to write back in secondary school to let your parents know what kind of grade you are at

    Most students will be given conditional offers from each university (or rejections, if the university thinks you are not a good fit for them). This will be something like "achieve ABB in x, y, z subjects". You usually wait until you have replies from all five university choices before picking your firm (first) and insurance (second) choices. If you achieve the grades required by your firm choice, you are guaranteed a place there. If not, but you meet the grades required by your insurance choice, you are guaranteed a place at your insurance choice. Some universities may be a bit flexible, e.g. if you achieve BBB instead of ABB but your marks were close they may still let you in, but it's definitely not guaranteed.

    Another type of offer some universities give out are unconditional offers. These are 100% guaranteed places at this university - usually given to students who have already finished their A levels and are applying during a gap year, although there have been cases of current A level students with very high predicted grades being given unconditional offers as a way of enticing them to go to a perhaps slightly lower ranked university. This is very rare though.

    If you don't meet your predicted grades it doesn't matter, as long as you meet the conditional offer grades. However, if you miss your conditional offer grades for both your firm and insurance choice, you will be placed into UCAS clearing (you can also request to be entered into clearing if you change your mind about university choices too). Essentially, UCAS clearing is where all the universities with spaces left on some of their courses (e.g. because they didn't have enough applicants, or too many of their offer holders failed to get the required grades) reopen applications for students who haven't yet confirmed a university place. Although I think UCAS clearing technically stays open for a few weeks, it's first-come-first-served, so there is a bit of a mad panic for a couple of days where students phone up universities and ask them if they would consider their application. If you end up in clearing, don't feel pressured to accept a university place if it isn't 100% the right course or university for you - you may be better off taking a gap year and reapplying, since there are only a limited range of courses in clearing.

    I hope this helps
 
 
 
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