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Checking blind spot when going 40-70mph Watch

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    I understand the importance of checking your blind spot, but I don't really understand exactly where the blind spot is. I check over my right shoulder when joining a dual carriageway or changing lanes, however when I do that the car veers towards the right. I'm obviously spending too long checking, how exactly should I do it?

    Also, when I'm changing lanes (or merging into the dual carriageway) I'm always quite panicked. I see a clear spot and quickly move into it before the spot closes. My mind goes "quick it's clear, move into the lane". It's way too of an aggressive lane change, especially when I'm going 65mph. How do I learn to change lanes slowly? When I watch my parents drive the steering wheel barely moves and they slowly, gradually slide into the lane over several metres. I've tried to emulate this but in the moment I'm just so panicked and rushed.

    I'm a good, safe driver in other situations. In fact, once I'm on the dual carriageway I'm relaxed and comfortable it's just getting on it and changing lanes.

    Any advice?

    Thank you.
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    Your blind spot is any area of road you can't see either through your windscreen or in your mirrors. Search Google, there are plenty of diagrams. When checking, you should only need a quick glance over your shoulder. You don't need to analyze everything you can see on your side, all you need to do is check if something is in the gap or not. This is something that you'll want to practice and will hopefully get better at over time.

    It's not necessarily a bad thing to change lanes quickly, so long as you signal correctly and allow enough room. Though if you start moving as soon as you start signalling then that's something you need to fix, and panicking behind the wheel clearly isn't a good thing either. Focus, observe the traffic and work out where you want to go. Then just go through the procedure one step at a time - mirror, shoulder, signal, move. If you can do that correctly and calmly you shouldn't have any trouble.
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    the veering is not necessarily anything to do with the time you are taking to look .

    it's to do with where you are turning 'from'

    assuming you have normal neck articulation you can look towards your blindspot without moving your body much if at all as most people can move their head to at least 90 degrees from straight ahead without havign to move their shoulders / trunk / hips

    if you are twisting your truk your shoulders will move and unless you correct that movement you will naturally tend to turn the wheel to the right ...
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    Just sounds like you need more practice to be honest. The area you can see out of your back right window, that is your blind spot.
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    I suspect people will probably jump on me for saying this, but I actually very rarely check my blindspot on motorways/dual carriageways except when joining. I spend so much time monitoring my mirrors anyway that I know whether a car has approached but not passed. Obviously I'll check if I have any doubt, but that's fairly rare.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I suspect people will probably jump on me for saying this, but I actually very rarely check my blindspot on motorways/dual carriageways except when joining. I spend so much time monitoring my mirrors anyway that I know whether a car has approached but not passed. Obviously I'll check if I have any doubt, but that's fairly rare.
    I won't lie, me too. I usually always know the exact positioning of all cars behind me, and again just like you I'll only really check if I have any doubts.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I suspect people will probably jump on me for saying this, but I actually very rarely check my blindspot on motorways/dual carriageways except when joining. I spend so much time monitoring my mirrors anyway that I know whether a car has approached but not passed. Obviously I'll check if I have any doubt, but that's fairly rare.
    The only trouble you have with that is if someone merges from outside->middle at the same time you go from inside->middle (or the other way around). Or accidentally flattening a motorcyclist you didn't manage to spot in your mirrors.
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    (Original post by Sparkliest)
    Also, when I'm changing lanes (or merging into the dual carriageway) I'm always quite panicked. I see a clear spot and quickly move into it before the spot closes. My mind goes "quick it's clear, move into the lane". It's way too of an aggressive lane change, especially when I'm going 65mph. How do I learn to change lanes slowly? When I watch my parents drive the steering wheel barely moves and they slowly, gradually slide into the lane over several metres. I've tried to emulate this but in the moment I'm just so panicked and rushed.
    changing lanes smoothly comes with practice - once you're on a motorway/dual carriageway in little to no traffic practice.

    I used to try to change lanes without hitting any catseyes - you can't do that if your swerving into a lane it's about getting a very gentle angle. It's all about planning and giving yourself the time and space to move - if you're just spotting small gaps and leaping into them then you're being a bit too reactionary and not planning far enough ahead...eventually driving like that will exhaust you.

    (as for the blind spot - it's just a check that there's no cars or bikes (or people) in the space you're about to move into...most accidents/near misses I've seen from people not checking are people pulling onto a motorway and pulling straight out into the middle/fast lane without checking their blind spot between lane changes and people not checking on large multi lane roundabouts).
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    It will soon come naturally, just remember, don't be like me and casually do 90 in the outside lane most of the time. Motorway driving comes naturally as long as you can anticipate the speed of cars in other lanes around you, I was on a motorway after just two days of passing my test and with a total of 30 hours driving experience and it just came naturally to me from the start, just remember don't panic and you'll be fine.

    Now have more than two years of driving experience with two years no claims bonus and experiences driving all sorts of different cars ranging from a brand new 2016 Mercedes C-Class (I worked as a 'driver' for a rental car firm) to my current car which is a 2007 Fiat Grande Punto
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    checking blind spot is pointless, my car does not have the ability to check blind spot and I cant say its ever been an issue. just have a bit of awareness of whos around you when you drive past them.
 
 
 
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