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    I need to know the difference between a diploma and a certicate of higher education I've selected certificate of HE and I wish to then transfer over to a brick uni once completed. However I've been told by a friend that I've made a mistake by doing this and that am better suited to diploma of HE because once I've completed the course I can transfer to brick uni and be in second year. I've been told that a certicate of HE is worth a foundation degree and that's not what I want to do can someone verify this Please help me!!!

    Ps I may have to change everything with my uni and student finance so that's why it's urgent

    Thanks
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    (Original post by MGatsby)
    I need to know the difference between a diploma and a certicate of higher education I've selected certificate of HE and I wish to then transfer over to a brick uni once completed. However I've been told by a friend that I've made a mistake by doing this and that am better suited to diploma of HE because once I've completed the course I can transfer to brick uni and be in second year. I've been told that a certicate of HE is worth a foundation degree and that's not what I want to do can someone verify this Please help me!!!

    Ps I may have to change everything with my uni and student finance so that's why it's urgent

    Thanks
    What do you want to study?

    Cert HE = equivalent to the first year of a university degree
    Dip HE = equivalent to two years of a university degree

    A foundation degree is also equivalent to the first two years of a university degree, but foundation degrees are nearly always in vocational subjects, whereas a DipHE is academic.

    If it is your intention to go to a brick university and you can't do an Access to HE course then you should do a CertHE (but make sure you don't take longer than one academic year to do it, any longer and you won't get full funding to do a degree at a brick university). You do understand that you will almost certainly have to begin the brick university degree from the first year?
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    its the equivalent of 1 ft academic year. Its not possible to achieve the 120 credits required at ou in one academic year. Mainly because they prevent doing level 2 before 60 credits completed at level 1 unless you have earned credit points elsewhere. taking 2 years at ou would still enable you to have 3 years sfe funding. You simply lose the grace year for resits etc.
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    really also worth bearing in mind that not all universities accept a transfer into second or third year. I know of some ou students who have had to repeat the first year when they transferred.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    its the equivalent of 1 ft academic year. Its not possible to achieve the 120 credits required at ou in one academic year. Mainly because they prevent doing level 2 before 60 credits completed at level 1 unless you have earned credit points elsewhere. taking 2 years at ou would still enable you to have 3 years sfe funding. You simply lose the grace year for resits etc.
    Sadly doing two years at the OU would remove 2 years full time funding, so you can only study one year with the OU. If your new full time course is 3 years the calculation is: 3 years + 1 (grace year) - time spent in HE. If you've done two years with the OU then the result of that is: 3 + 1 - 2 = 2 years full time funding left. So you would either have to fund the first year yourself or be lucky enough to get into year 2 of your new degree.
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    No 2 years at OU is equivalent to 1 year at brick uni. I know this because I transferred from OU to brick.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    No 2 years at OU is equivalent to 1 year at brick uni. I know this because I transferred from OU to brick.
    You were lucky then, it sounds like whoever reviewed your loan application made a mistake.

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    I don't understand why you think it's a mistake. The OU course is twice the length of the ft equivalent and half the credits. This is how they reasoned 2 OU years were 1 uni year in terms of financial assistance. If they were exactly the same, no one would get funding for the last two years at open university. Which is not the case, the undergrad course is fully funded for the 6 years or 6 +2
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    I don't understand why you think it's a mistake. The OU course is twice the length of the ft equivalent and half the credits. This is how they reasoned 2 OU years were 1 uni year in terms of financial assistance. If they were exactly the same, no one would get funding for the last two years at open university. Which is not the case, the undergrad course is fully funded for the 6 years or 6 +2
    That would be because full time and part time funding is different for SFE, hence the rules are different.

    As I've said it isn't about the amount of credits or how long it might take to study them its about the actual amount of time you spend in HE. I'd post the SFE rules here, but there's no point as you've already been lucky enough to secure your funding. However, it was due to a mistake on SFE's part. Assuming you did spend more than 1 academic year studying with the OU.

    It is nothing to do with equivalency. I wish it was because then I and many others would have got full time funding and would have completed our degrees and received that bit of paper from a much more prestigious university and had better and more extensive tutor and peer support; but that's life I guess.
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    Well on the plus side open uni IS prestigious and you get just as much contact really.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    Well on the plus side open uni IS prestigious and you get just as much contact really.
    OU students get hardly any contact with lecturers. An hour or two each month seems to be the norm.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    That would be because full time and part time funding is different for SFE, hence the rules are different.

    As I've said it isn't about the amount of credits or how long it might take to study them its about the actual amount of time you spend in HE. I'd post the SFE rules here, but there's no point as you've already been lucky enough to secure your funding. However, it was due to a mistake on SFE's part. Assuming you did spend more than 1 academic year studying with the OU.

    It is nothing to do with equivalency. I wish it was because then I and many others would have got full time funding and would have completed our degrees and received that bit of paper from a much more prestigious university and had better and more extensive tutor and peer support; but that's life I guess.
    or they may have self funded parts of their OU study as was the norm for many many many years.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    or they may have self funded parts of their OU study as was the norm for many many many years.
    That doesn't matter, its still based on how long you've spent in HE no matter how its funded.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    Well on the plus side open uni IS prestigious and you get just as much contact really.
    I think I've just been unlucky with some tutors over the past couple of years. I was spoiled in first year with some amazing tutors. For my level 2 modules I've had two who were amazing and the other two reply sporadically to emails, don't use the forum and are generally disengaged. Plus, I'm still bitter SFE can't sort their rules out and I couldn't get my full time funding because some assessors follow the rules and others don't.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    That doesn't matter, its still based on how long you've spent in HE no matter how its funded.
    really ?

    I think you need to provide proper evidence to back that up .
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    really ?

    I think you need to provide proper evidence to back that up .
    Why? Go look it up for yourself. It's the rules set down by Student Finance England, not me. It denied me entry into university, so why would I make it up?

    The below is taken from an email sent to me by Student finance explaining their regulations:

    "Regulation 21 as follows:

    Standard entitlement of current system students who have transferred from or otherwise studied on a previous course

    21.—(1) The standard entitlement of a current system student who has studied on a previous course and who does not fall within regulation 22 is calculated as follows—

    (OD+1) - PC

    where
    OD is the number of academic years that make up the ordinary duration of the course PC is the number of academic years that the student has spent on previous courses.

    Regulation 12 defines previous course as follows:

    Previous course

    12.—(1) Subject to the exceptions in paragraphs (4) to (7), a “previous course” is—

    (b) where the current course begins on or after 1st September 2009—
    (i) a lower level qualification achieved following a full-time or part-time higher education course, a course for the initial training of teachers or a course designated under regulation 5(10), which the student attended or, in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertook before the current course;

    (ii) a full-time higher education course, a course for the initial training of teachers or a course designated under regulation 5(10), which the student attended, or in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertook before the current course where the student studied but did not achieve a qualification and which meets one or both of the conditions in paragraph (3);

    The conditions listed in paragraph (3) are as follows:

    (3) The conditions are—
    (a) the course was provided at a publicly funded institution whether or not in the United Kingdom for some or all of the academic years during which the student attended or undertook the course; or
    (b) any scholarship, exhibition, bursary, grant, allowance or award of any description which was paid in respect of the student’s attending or, in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertaking the course to defray fees was from public funds or funds attributable to public funds.

    Therefore the previous study calculation used to establish your standard entitlement is as follows:

    ( 3 + 1 ) - 3

    As you only have one year of standard entitlement remaining this will mean that you qualify for tuition fee support in the final year of your new course in accordance with regulations 19(5) and 19(6) as follows:

    Availability of fee loans to current system students - general

    19.—(5) The standard entitlement is calculated in accordance with regulation 20, 21 or 22.

    (6) When assessing an application for support in respect of an academic year of a designated course, the Secretary of State must allocate a fee loan from the standard entitlement first to the final standard academic year of the course and then to each preceding standard academic year in turn until the standard entitlement is exhausted or a fee loan has been allocated to each standard academic year of the course.

    Eligibility to a maintenance/special support grant is reliant on a students' eligibility to receive a tuition fee loan in the relevant academic year. Therefore in any year in which you do not qualify for a tuition fee loan you will also not be entitled to receive a maintenance/special support grant. This is in accordance with Regulations
    56(3) and 61(3) respectively as follows:

    Qualifying conditions for the maintenance grant

    56.—(3) If a current system student does not qualify for a fee loan in respect of an academic year of the designated course, the student cannot qualify for a maintenance grant for that year unless the reason that the student does not qualify for a fee loan is that—
    (a) the year is an Erasmus year; or
    (b) the designated course is an old flexible postgraduate course for the initial training of teachers.

    Qualifying conditions for the special support grant

    61.—(3) If a current system student does not qualify for a fee loan in respect of an academic year of the designated course, the student cannot qualify for a special support grant for that year unless the reason that the student does not qualify for a fee loan is that—
    (a) the year is an Erasmus year; or
    (b) the designated course is an old flexible postgraduate course for the initial training of teachers.

    Please also be aware that an additional year of tuition fee funding may be awarded in the first year of a students new course if the student has failed a previous course due to compelling personal reasons (CPR). This is in accordance with Regulation 19(8) as follows:

    Availability of fee loans to current system students - general

    19.—(8) In addition to the standard entitlement, a current system student who falls within regulation 21 qualifies for a fee loan in respect of the first academic year that the student takes of the designated course that is not a bursary year or an Erasmus year if the student failed to complete the most recent previous course because of compelling personal reasons."
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    OU students get hardly any contact with lecturers. An hour or two each month seems to be the norm.
    Yes but it's mostly quality contact. I'd prefer that to 8 hours a month of listening to them read a PowerPoint word for word.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    Why? Go look it up for yourself. It's the rules set down by Student Finance England, not me. It denied me entry into university, so why would I make it up?

    <snip>

    where
    OD is the number of academic years that make up the ordinary duration of the course PC is the number of academic years that the student has spent on previous courses.

    Regulation 12 defines previous course as follows:

    Previous course

    12.—(1) Subject to the exceptions in paragraphs (4) to (7), a “previous course” is—

    (b) where the current course begins on or after 1st September 2009—
    (i) a lower level qualification achieved following a full-time or part-time higher education course, a course for the initial training of teachers or a course designated under regulation 5(10), which the student attended or, in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertook before the current course;

    (ii) a full-time higher education course, a course for the initial training of teachers or a course designated under regulation 5(10), which the student attended, or in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertook before the current course where the student studied but did not achieve a qualification and which meets one or both of the conditions in paragraph (3);

    The conditions listed in paragraph (3) are as follows:

    (3) The conditions are—
    (a) the course was provided at a publicly funded institution whether or not in the United Kingdom for some or all of the academic years during which the student attended or undertook the course; or
    (b) any scholarship, exhibition, bursary, grant, allowance or award of any description which was paid in respect of the student’s attending or, in the case of a compressed degree course or a designated distance learning course, undertaking the course to defray fees was from public funds or funds attributable to public funds.

    <snip>

    i would suiggest that you ought to gain a little bit of an understanding as to why previous self funded OU study might not count ... don't forget that many years OU was not considered a publicly funded institutuion for the purposes of student dupport
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    i would suiggest that you ought to gain a little bit of an understanding as to why previous self funded OU study might not count ... don't forget that many years OU was not considered a publicly funded institutuion for the purposes of student dupport
    Well you're quite rude aren't you! It doesn't matter how its funded, as the regulations above state, its about the amount of time you've spent in HE.

    But the poster in this instance is funding through SFE so that rather renders your point moot.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    Well you're quite rude aren't you! It doesn't matter how its funded, as the regulations above state, its about the amount of time you've spent in HE.

    But the poster in this instance is funding through SFE so that rather renders your point moot.
    Student finance is about funded years not about what other education you have done ...
 
 
 
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