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    I'm quite short, 5'2" and my average grade is A*/A.
    I got 10 A*s and 2 As at GCSE, 4 AAAA at AS and I'm predicted A*A*A at A level.
    Everyone in my family is also pretty short but got good grades... I doubt there's a real correlation between height and grades.
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    6'2"

    Current avg grade based on FA's and HW would be: A/A*
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    (Original post by trustmeimlying1)
    The sexual tension between yee two pensioners ...hummmmdinger!!
    Pensioners! Outrageous :fuhrer:
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    5'5
    GCSE - 5A*, 3A, 2B
    A level - A*A*BB
    Degree - 1st

    I imagine some of the correlation might come down to family/nutrition - kids who are well cared for + healthy are more likely to be tall and also more likely to succeed at school... kids who are not well cared for are probably less nourished and will be shorter and less likely to succeed - if it's there at all.
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    TES have reported that taller students do better at school based on a study of over 10,000 students in the USA.







    Is it true for UK students? Post your height and your average grades and let's compare

    :bl:
    Not being a ****, but considering that this is "The Student Room", this is a really anti-educational treatment of an educational topic.

    This thread is all-out, full-on tabloid treatment of a paper.

    The paper is very limiting in its analysis, and states that the findings are only valid for large schools. Further, there is a strong relationship between academic outcomes, sports participation and height. The suggestion is that tall male students in large schools are more likely to participate in sports and continue their education for longer.

    The key point is -
    (Original post by Gorry (2017) Economics of Education Review 56)
    the relationship between academic outcomes and height diminishes when additional controls and school fixed effects are included. The decline in the relationship between height and outcomes is large and the relationships are no longer significant in many cases. Thus, on average, height is not correlated with academic improvement once controls are included. Much of the fall is due to the addition of parental education, which is positively and significantly related to height in this sample.

    10.1016/j.econedurev.2016.11.002
    TL;DR - for male students at large US schools, there is a marginal positive relationship between height and length of education. This effect disappears when controls such as parental education are introduced, and the effect is heavily correlated with sports participation.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Not being a ****, but considering that this is "The Student Room", this is a really anti-educational treatment of an educational topic.

    This thread is all-out, full-on tabloid treatment of a paper.

    The paper is very limiting in its analysis, and states that the findings are only valid for large schools. Further, there is a strong relationship between academic outcomes, sports participation and height. The suggestion is that tall male students in large schools are more likely to participate in sports and continue their education for longer.

    The key point is -

    TL;DR - for male students at large US schools, there is a marginal positive relationship between height and length of education. This effect disappears when controls such as parental education are introduced, and the effect is heavily correlated with sports participation.
    On TSR students like to share their experiences and that's exactly what they're doing here - this isn't a scientific study, I'm just asking students how they feel about this which is completely fine IMO. We're not belittling the study, instead giving the opportunity to young people to break down the box they have been put in.... today it's related to grades and height, tomorrow it will be something else.

    Regarding 'tabloid treatment'.... well how many young people do you think get the opportunity to read TES or even have it on their radar? At least we're sharing this mainstream and I've provided the link which means students can read the whole article and paper if they'd like too.

    The masses read tabloids.....
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    5'11". First year of uni, my average grade was 88%.
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    TES have reported that taller students do better at school based on a study of over 10,000 students in the USA.







    Is it true for UK students? Post your height and your average grades and let's compare

    :bl:
    5"3 and my average grade A
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    I'm 5'9 and my average grades were A/B.
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    On TSR students like to share their experiences and that's exactly what they're doing here - this isn't a scientific study, I'm just asking students how they feel about this which is completely fine IMO. We're not belittling the study, instead giving the opportunity to young people to break down the box they have been put in.... today it's related to grades and height, tomorrow it will be something else.

    Regarding 'tabloid treatment'.... well how many young people do you think get the opportunity to read TES or even have it on their radar? At least we're sharing this mainstream and I've provided the link which means students can read the whole article and paper if they'd like too.

    The masses read tabloids.....
    No.

    No. No. No.

    I don't want to get down on you about this, but you are just contributing to the whole "fake news" agenda.

    The study shows pretty much the exact opposite of what you've suggested, and lo and behold, there are people posting about how short they are, yet they seem to get all the good grades.

    You can't read the paper via TES - you'd have to go to the journal via JSTOR or something, and if you don't have institutional access, you'd have to pay to read it.

    What you've done here is the equivalent of "it was warm yesterday - how worried are you that the sun will explode?", and then cited an astronomy paper detailing how the sun will burn out in 5 billion years.

    This wasn't in chat, this wasn't an obviously jovial post - it's about education on a student forum, citing a paper from a social sciences peer-reviewed journal.

    In this respect, don't you think you need to do better than that?
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    4' 1''

    A* at school
    90% average at uni
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    Average height, average grades
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    Most of the smart people I know are pretty short

    I'm 5'3 and got:
    7 A*s, 1 A, 2 Bs and 1 D at GCSE
    AAB in my Year 12 mocks

    So I'm sorta going against this aha
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    (Original post by NiamhM1801)
    Most of the smart people I know are pretty short

    I'm 5'3 and got:
    7 A*s, 1 A, 2 Bs and 1 D at GCSE
    AAB in my Year 12 mocks

    So I'm sorta going against this aha
    Winning :banana:
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    5'3 1/2 (that 1/2 makes a big difference) and at GCSE I averaged As/A*s. At A Level (year 12) its more like high Bs/low As.
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    Height: Around 6ft
    GCSEs: Mostly As/Bs (I don't even remember :laugh:)
    A-Levels: ABB
    Degree: 73% average over years 2 and 3

    I have a lot of friends I consider to be significantly smarter than me and almost all happen to be shorter than I am so obviously these kinds of findings should be taken with a pinch of salt!
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    (Original post by UWS)
    At GCSE: 5'3 - 2 A*, 1 A, 5 B and 1 C
    At A Level: 5'3 - BBC
    At uni: 5'3 - First

    So I haven't grown in 7 years, I think that's the main worry here.
    I love how you went from BBC to a first at uni; there is hope
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    About 6'3 (192 cm)
    predicted 42 in the IB (6 in Math HL, 7 in Physics HL, 7 in Economics HL)
    116 TOEFL
    780 Physics SAT ST
    800 Math Level 2 SAT ST
    1550 in SAT with 23 in Essay
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    TES have reported that taller students do better at school based on a study of over 10,000 students in the USA.







    Is it true for UK students? Post your height and your average grades and let's compare

    :bl:
    4" 3

    My average grade is A**
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    (Original post by fefssdf)
    I love how you went from BBC to a first at uni; there is hope
    I have a success blog about it, check it out. Link is in my signature
 
 
 
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