Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have applied to study Aerospace Engineering at Sheffield Hallam have any current students got any tips.
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Hey Matt,

    Great to see you've applied for Aerospace at Hallam. What made you choose the course?

    Do you have an idea of what you'd like to know from a current student? When you say 'tips', do you mean study tips, or more general information about the course? Let us know what you'd like to know and we'll hunt someone down for you! :horse:

    Laura
    (Official Hallam rep)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sheffield Hallam University)
    Hey Matt,

    Great to see you've applied for Aerospace at Hallam. What made you choose the course?

    Do you have an idea of what you'd like to know from a current student? When you say 'tips', do you mean study tips, or more general information about the course? Let us know what you'd like to know and we'll hunt someone down for you! :horse:

    Laura
    (Official Hallam rep)
    I decided to apply for Aerospace Engineering because I have always found the
    mechanics of aircraft intresting. I would like to find out about things such as what to revise for before I start.
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mattchapman787)
    I decided to apply for Aerospace Engineering because I have always found the
    mechanics of aircraft intresting. I would like to find out about things such as what to revise for before I start.
    Great, OK. Let me find some information for you and I'll get back to you soon!

    Laura
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sheffield Hallam University)
    Great, OK. Let me find some information for you and I'll get back to you soon!

    Laura
    Thank you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey Matt

    I am a current student at Hallam and I can say the best things to revise for are aerodynamics, structures and propulsions. These are the main areas we study/ied there is a materials branch but unfortunately for myself is quite a new feature to Hallam so I am unsure what exactly they cover.

    Other things we cover is CAD simulation, professional engineering standards, systems/ avionics and control.
    the primary focus would be the aerodynamics and structures though as they seem to be the two modules that people have greatest difficulty with.

    When starting to read up on stuff try to go for 'the basics' first as they ease you into the concepts first then work your way into the heavier mathematics.
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mattchapman787)
    I have applied to study Aerospace Engineering at Sheffield Hallam have any current students got any tips.
    (Original post by cjtarring3)
    Hey Matt

    I am a current student at Hallam and I can say the best things to revise for are aerodynamics, structures and propulsions. These are the main areas we study/ied there is a materials branch but unfortunately for myself is quite a new feature to Hallam so I am unsure what exactly they cover.

    Other things we cover is CAD simulation, professional engineering standards, systems/ avionics and control.
    the primary focus would be the aerodynamics and structures though as they seem to be the two modules that people have greatest difficulty with.

    When starting to read up on stuff try to go for 'the basics' first as they ease you into the concepts first then work your way into the heavier mathematics.
    Hey Matt,

    See the advice above from cjtarring3, one of our current Aerospace Engineering students.

    I've also spoken to current student, Jordan, who has recommended the following:

    'I would definitely recommend that you work on mathematics, particularly calculus. Although you will have covered this during A-Level mathematics, if you're studying this. When you arrive at university you are expected to have a good grasp on methods and be able to perform complex integral and derivations. This will become an advantage during modules such as mechanics, aerodynamics and structural analysis.

    "I would recommend brushing up on computing skills and understanding report writing. Although this will be covered during level 4 modules and during induction/freshers week, it wouldn't hurt to begin understanding the process early.

    "As for computing methods, such as computer aided design (CAD) with SolidWorks - have a brief look at FEA/CFD with Ansys. Even if this is just reading literature and not hands on with the software, it will give a good insight into what will be expected over the next three years."

    Hope that helps if you've got any specific questions about Jordan's advice, we'll get back in touch with him for some further guidance.

    Laura
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I don't go to that uni but I study aerospace engineering. Personally the problem I see is that most people can get good marks in the exams but when it comes to real hands on stuff for example when you have to work on projects such as build a UAV or quadcopter, most people don't know where to start. By that I mean most people aren't good at programming and electronics related stuff. Most of the stuff you learn in lectures doesn't equate to real world at least as an undergrad. I recommend to begin learning some programming language such as C/C++ or python. And get an arduino kit and start messing with it. That will help when you start projects on 2nd and 3rd years


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sheffield Hallam University)
    Hey Matt,

    See the advice above from cjtarring3, one of our current Aerospace Engineering students.

    I've also spoken to current student, Jordan, who has recommended the following:

    'I would definitely recommend that you work on mathematics, particularly calculus. Although you will have covered this during A-Level mathematics, if you're studying this. When you arrive at university you are expected to have a good grasp on methods and be able to perform complex integral and derivations. This will become an advantage during modules such as mechanics, aerodynamics and structural analysis.

    "I would recommend brushing up on computing skills and understanding report writing. Although this will be covered during level 4 modules and during induction/freshers week, it wouldn't hurt to begin understanding the process early.

    "As for computing methods, such as computer aided design (CAD) with SolidWorks - have a brief look at FEA/CFD with Ansys. Even if this is just reading literature and not hands on with the software, it will give a good insight into what will be expected over the next three years."

    Hope that helps if you've got any specific questions about Jordan's advice, we'll get back in touch with him for some further guidance.

    Laura
    Thank you this was very helpful.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cjtarring3)
    Hey Matt

    I am a current student at Hallam and I can say the best things to revise for are aerodynamics, structures and propulsions. These are the main areas we study/ied there is a materials branch but unfortunately for myself is quite a new feature to Hallam so I am unsure what exactly they cover.

    Other things we cover is CAD simulation, professional engineering standards, systems/ avionics and control.
    the primary focus would be the aerodynamics and structures though as they seem to be the two modules that people have greatest difficulty with.

    When starting to read up on stuff try to go for 'the basics' first as they ease you into the concepts first then work your way into the heavier mathematics.
    Thank you this was very helpful.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    I don't go to that uni but I study aerospace engineering. Personally the problem I see is that most people can get good marks in the exams but when it comes to real hands on stuff for example when you have to work on projects such as build a UAV or quadcopter, most people don't know where to start. By that I mean most people aren't good at programming and electronics related stuff. Most of the stuff you learn in lectures doesn't equate to real world at least as an undergrad. I recommend to begin learning some programming language such as C/C++ or python. And get an arduino kit and start messing with it. That will help when you start projects on 2nd and 3rd years


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you I am currently designing and building a quadcopter for my engineering project at college so the knowledge that i will acquire from my project will come in useful for my degree.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.