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Anyone else depressed seeing the state of the job market? Watch

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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    That's an interesting read - thanks! A very unfortunate combination of factors by the sounds of it. Essentially, you sound totally hobbled by the experience requirement - this is very relevant to the OP's original post. The old chestnut of not being able to get the job because you don't have the experience and not being able to get the experience without the job.

    I really hope grad medicine works out for you - the improvement in the financial part of it is encouraging. We just now need access to the full SFE package as undergrads have.
    cheers, if you dont mind me asking, you also a health professional?

    even if i dont get GEM, GP surgery clincial pharmacists earn the same as GPs did 3 years ago and have been proven to be more successful in pilot schemes than the NHS intended (the way it is progressing atm, community pharmacy will be shifted to pharmacy technicians in the next 5 years and most of the non-diagnostic medical stuff in GP stuff will be carried out by clinical pharmacists and band7/8 nurses).
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    Why not train in skills people want?
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    (Original post by Shadow2009)
    But this is my frustration, though. I'm 23 and have been trying to start getting experience in that sector for a long time. I could easily get experience with volunteering if I could find a part time job or a job with less conventional working hours (I saw a job posted advertising a 1pm - 9pm shift which would have been ideal as I could have volunteered before work) but everything is always a 9 - 5 or a "be flexible anytime" type deal.

    There was a weekend course in youth work I was going to take a few weeks ago and would have been a HUGE advantage in getting a job in that field but I noticed it last minute and missed the cut-off date for applications.
    Maybe you need to change your goals and expectations. What is it that draws you towards youth work? Is it working with children? If so, then become a teacher or something. You can then move into youth work easily from there. As echoed by another poster, you need to work where there is work/ demand.
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    (Original post by Bubblyminty)
    If you know youth work has few opportunities at the moment, then you need to look elsewhere. Acquire "experience" then re-explore this area when you are in a better position. Find a job with set typical hours and fit in volunteering around that and on weekends.

    Or perhaps study part-time on top. There are instances where people work full time and study part time. Or you could look at doing an open uni course.
    adding on to Bubblymint, you could try getting hospice work. Old people homes I wouldnt really recommend as can be problematic on various levels
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    Jobs market and everything in life
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    Why not train in skills people want?
    Because learning a skill just to make money isn't something I'm interested in. I'd rather work doing something I genuinely enjoy.

    Maybe you need to change your goals and expectations. What is it that draws you towards youth work? Is it working with children? If so, then become a teacher or something. You can then move into youth work easily from there. As echoed by another poster, you need to work where there is work/ demand.
    Hmm. I dunno. I'd like to help young people find work, stay off drugs, stay off alcohol and definitely stay out of young offenders/prison. It seems very rewarding and something I've always been interested in. It's a very specific sector and I guess I should have been prepared for the lack of opportunities but it's still a bit disheartening when you know what you want to do but just can't find a way into it.

    I really do respect other peoples opinions when they say I should work where the money is and take up something that has job security and where there's actually a demand, but it's just not for me. I'm happy to pay my dues doing these *****y entry level jobs UNTIL I find a balance that can get me into the sector I want, but I'm really against taking a degree or something in a completely unrelated field just for the money. I don't want to regret it when I'm older and be miserable doing something I'm not really passionate about.
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    (Original post by Shadow2009)
    Because learning a skill just to make money isn't something I'm interested in. I'd rather work doing something I genuinely enjoy.



    Hmm. I dunno. I'd like to help young people find work, stay off drugs, stay off alcohol and definitely stay out of young offenders/prison. It seems very rewarding and something I've always been interested in. It's a very specific sector and I guess I should have been prepared for the lack of opportunities but it's still a bit disheartening when you know what you want to do but just can't find a way into it.

    I really do respect other peoples opinions when they say I should work where the money is and take up something that has job security and where there's actually a demand, but it's just not for me. I'm happy to pay my dues doing these *****y entry level jobs UNTIL I find a balance that can get me into the sector I want, but I'm really against taking a degree or something in a completely unrelated field just for the money. I don't want to regret it when I'm older and be miserable doing something I'm not really passionate about.
    You could do those things as a teacher, to an extent (especially if you chose to work in a particularly deprived school). It's would defo set you in good stead for the work you have always wanted to do.

    I admire your idealism and worthy pursuits, but sometimes we have to balance that out with pragmatism.
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    (Original post by quasa)
    in my case its a pain in the backside as I am a healthcare professional living in an area with a high proportion of health profesionals :| and unless you have nepotistic connections / have a minimum of 2 years experience as a registered health professional (mine is just under 15 months)/ work for low rate on an extremely adhoc basis, then you have to move hundreds of miles away to remote village to get a fulltime job in the sector im currently in (to move sectors I have to wait between 9 and 21 months before applying :|)

    In the year and a bit that I have been a registered health professional, I have only had 67 days of work (most recently was in november). I myself have been keeping myself busy with volunteer work and pursuing other interests but the job market is crap. In terms of non-healthcare jobs available to me within 30 miles, it is literally courier work, trainee chefs or minimum wage 0 hour contract stuff
    Long time no chat!!How are yeh bud?

    Thats great you mustve got a 2.1 if you can apply for |Gradmed. Also do yeh find answering what part of UK yeh live in that its so hard to get work for pharmacists?
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    (Original post by trustmeimlying1)
    Long time no chat!!How are yeh bud?

    Thats great you mustve got a 2.1 if you can apply for |Gradmed. Also do yeh find answering what part of UK yeh live in that its so hard to get work for pharmacists?
    hey, pm'd you the answers.
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    It's not so much the state of the market, it is how you are treated when applying for positions.

    You are lucky to get an automated response and a miracle to actually have a human reply.

    It is a depressing experience, applying for jobs and more hoping to get even the vaguest response as sign you might be on the right track to ending your unemployment.

    Might be worth using an agent, it takes some of the tedium out of the search, my agent is a nice enough guy but a bugger to get hold of when you need to.
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    Get some skill others don't have, teach something like an instrument, language, English. If you don't have one yet, you can pick one up: law conversion, personal trainer. If all else fails, move abroad and teach English and try and make it as a freelance blogger/do odd jobs. Perhaps easier to do jobs you like in places which are not as expensive as the UK.

    I agree, dull jobs otherwise.
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    I'd echo what an above poster said and recommend trying to get into teaching or social work or similar. Even working in charities that help with drug use/homelessness/unemployment or similar can help you gain those skills - and then later you can specify further by only working with young people when the roles come up. It's not a world's difference from what you want to do. Your dream job isn't going to magically appear right away, especially a job that asks for no experience - as I'm sure you've noticed! So get the transferable experience whilst keeping an eye out for the right job. This is how many people get their dream jobs, unless they get onto a good grad scheme which is rare.

    Where are you looking btw? I find it's more useful to look on organisation specific websites rather than general recruitment websites, and it may be worth being willing to relocate if you're in an area with low opportunities.
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    (Original post by Shadow2009)
    But there's tons of jobs that exist that "anyone can do" and don't require a degree. There's stuff like delivery driving for companies, being a drivers mate, warehouse work, event stewarding, security work, kitchen porters, cleaners, litter pickers, car washers, general assistants in hotels/bars, runners for TV companies, driving instructor, travel agent, working with young offenders or in prisons etc or apprenticeships for plumbing, joinery, recruitment, etc that are just never seen online or available anywhere. There's a huge variety of jobs in the world that you KNOW exist but the only ones that are ever posted on job sites and in the newspapers and recommended by friends are the office and call centre stuff.
    Dont knock warehouse work.
    Where i work at one of my jobs (im hoping to get took on permanent there) people in the warehouse get paid good money. And theres plenty of different roles (fork lift driving, order pickers, dispatch office etc- even the copack bit where i currently am) and plenty of scope to move to something better within the company.
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    (Original post by Willy Pete)
    It's not so much the state of the market, it is how you are treated when applying for positions.

    You are lucky to get an automated response and a miracle to actually have a human reply.

    It is a depressing experience, applying for jobs and more hoping to get even the vaguest response as sign you might be on the right track to ending your unemployment.

    Might be worth using an agent, it takes some of the tedium out of the search, my agent is a nice enough guy but a bugger to get hold of when you need to.
    the best one I had was when I had an interview in King lynn for hospital work as a pre-reg pharmacist: the head of department was the interviewer and he kept swearing, playing on his phone, kept going in and out of the room. the dude wasnt remotely interested and he made me drive for 4 hours to deal with that
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    Hey,

    Have you had a look at Milkround? We advertise roles in loads of different sectors: Engineering, banking, finance, HR, Marketing, PR, Media... (just to name a few!)

    http://www.milkround.com/jobs/
 
 
 
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