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    Not completely sure on what these terms are about. Obviously leaving means leaving and not remaining in any part of the EU - and yet its being called a hard brexit. Surely a soft brexit just means remaining in parts of the EU? How do you interpret these terms, and is the govt doing the right thing?
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    I ordered a baked Brexit with some buttery Brexit on the side.
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    'Soft Brexit' (a.k.a. Diet Brexit, Brexit Lite, I Can't Believe It's Not Brexit, Brexit 0.0% Alcohol) would mean keeping things like free movement and continuing to adhere to certain EU treaties and regulations. The UK would still kinda be in the EU, but without the flag. This would be similar in some ways to what Norway and Switzerland have. They're not in the EU, but they may as well be in a lot of ways.

    'Hard Brexit' (a.k.a. Brexit Extra Strength, Brexit the uncut edition, Brexit with a side of more Brexit) would be a total withdrawal. No free movement, no EU regulations. The UK may as well be the US or India as far as the EU is concerned. That would also probably mean trade tariffs. But it would be in the EU's best interests to keep export tariffs low, at least. The UK is a net importer that many European exporters rely on.
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    Soft Brexit(the Norway option) has come to mean the closest possible relationship to the EU without actually being in.

    Hard UKIP/Tory Backbencher Brexit is a complete withdrawal from everything and reverting to WTO rules for trading.

    A Canada or Turkey type deal probably falls somewhere in the middle of the two.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    The UK is a net importer that many European exporters rely on.
    True but the key players in this seem to be backing their government in spite of any financial consequences.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38707997
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    Soft Brexit(the Norway option) has come to mean the closest possible relationship to the EU without actually being in.

    Hard UKIP/Tory Backbencher Brexit is a complete withdrawal from everything and reverting to WTO rules for trading.

    A Canada or Turkey type deal probably falls somewhere in the middle of the two.
    But David Cameron did not propose any alternative like this when he went to try and secure some alternative EU membership options. The vote was to just leave the whole thing entirely.

    I think it would be great if we could forget the EU and still have some access to some of the economic parts. But we voted to get out in full.
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    'Soft' Brexit just isn't Brexit at all.
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    (Original post by h1347698)
    But David Cameron did not propose any alternative like this when he went to try and secure some alternative EU membership options. The vote was to just leave the whole thing entirely.

    I think it would be great if we could forget the EU and still have some access to some of the economic parts. But we voted to get out in full.
    The only question on the ballot paper was in or out. The Norway option fulfills that criteria because it isn't EU membership, it's just a very close relationship(far too close for hardcore Brexiteers).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Economic_Area

    We actually already had what could be defined as an alternative membership due to all the opt-outs from EU legislation we have compared to other member states.

    http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-e...cordion-issues
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    I like my eggs soft so i can dip my toast in to the yoke.
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    (Original post by h1347698)
    But David Cameron did not propose any alternative like this when he went to try and secure some alternative EU membership options. The vote was to just leave the whole thing entirely.

    I think it would be great if we could forget the EU and still have some access to some of the economic parts. But we voted to get out in full.
    Its boring this, but as pointed out the only thing voted on was cease being a member. What our relationship was going to be was not stated. It looks likely we will leave and not much trade negotiations will be resolved as the UK seems to think it cna cherry pick and the EU are against this. That means its much more likely we will just leave and negotiations will be down to who pays what in terminating the agreement. We will still trade with the EU but likely to be subject to tariffs, just as we will impose them on goods from the EU.
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    Hard Brexit: What the democratic process has produced

    Soft Brexit: The outcome that those who don't like what the democratic process has produced want

    Its that simple. Politicians are now constantly flocking towards claiming that the people were unsure, didn't know the full extent of the consequences, were economically/politically illiterate and so came the distinction relating to the question you are asking.

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    (Original post by Pulse.)
    Hard Brexit: What the democratic process has produced

    Soft Brexit: The outcome that those who don't like what the democratic process has produced want

    Its that simple. Politicians are now constantly flocking towards claiming that the people were unsure, didn't know the full extent of the consequences, were economically/politically illiterate and so came the distinction relating to the question you are asking.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The only outcome of that process was that we will definitely leave the EU. What form that takes is up for grabs. As our friends in this video will tell you it doesn't mean leaving the single market.

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    Hard Brexit basically means having a relationship with the EU like the rest of the world does. Which frees the UK from being subject to EU laws but does make it harder for businesses to export to the EU. Even if they don't end up with tariffs on their exports they will have to comply with product standard testing or rules of origin verification that they wouldn't have done before and this will put costs on them. You can still export in to the EU single market but it just has a higher cost.

    If you want to avoid those costs you can look to retain membership of the single market which means you have to apply all the EU laws at home (which is why you get away with not having to do the product standard testing etc, because they know their rules apply in your country too). This would reduce the impact on UK exporters to the EU and make it virtually business as usual which is why a lot of the business community wanted this. This would be what people termed soft Brexit. However as the PM said in her speech last week, this isn't really leaving, it's only giving up Britain's ability to influence and vote on those rules as an EU member. Being a rule taker from someone else like this wouldn't be appropriate for a large economy like the UK.
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    The only outcome of that process was that we will definitely leave the EU. What form that takes is up for grabs. As our friends in this video will tell you it doesn't mean leaving the single market.

    But it does mean leaving the single market. What our friends in this video are suggesting is that we potentially, and desirably, don't have to leave the single market if that is the outcome of exit negotiations. Inevitably current arrangements, and the likely way it will remain, is that access to the single market comes with freedom of movement.
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    Christ, Brexit isnt an egg.
 
 
 
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