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    Hi Osiris, how much are you selling the pdfs for?
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    Hi Osiris, Im intending to take my GAMSAT on sept next year. But i feel i should probably start studying since im currently working full time now. Do you still have those pdf files for Des O Neill? i cnt seem to find them online.
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    Hey! I am aiming for the GAMSAT in March 2018. Since my time is so limited, I want to focus on using one main thing to prep for it. I have the Gold Standard Textbook, and the Des O-Neill 4 sets, and also been using Khan Academy to go through what I don't understand. So for studying (not practising), would you recommend the Gold Standard book or Des O-Neill's books?
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    (Original post by Abigaillyj)
    Hi Osiris, Im intending to take my GAMSAT on sept next year. But i feel i should probably start studying since im currently working full time now. Do you still have those pdf files for Des O Neill? i cnt seem to find them online.
    I found a few on eBay. But I'm purchasing mine from a guy on Australia's Carousell, cause that seller seemed the most legit.
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    hi. I am intending to buy the 4 books Des oneil course from ebay. it contains Science mcqs, humanities mcqs, writing stuff and science revision. is this the course you are referring to when you said
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    Hi,

    If any of you are interested in acquiring the PDFs and other materials, send me a private message.
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    please can
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    (Original post by Osiris Wintereisse)
    All, available, I've managed to get my hands on other PDFs as well (the whole Des O'Neill set) and much more.

    Hello Oris,

    I have a few Des O'Neill notes for section 3. do you have any available for section 1 and 2?
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    (Original post by Osiris Wintereisse)
    Hi,

    If any of you are interested in acquiring the PDFs and other materials, send me a private message.
    Hi Osiris,
    I am very interested in buying the bulk and have sent you a private message. Thanks
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    (Original post by Osiris Wintereisse)
    I took the GAMSAT twice and scored 76 the first time and 82 the second time. Once in March 2016 as well as September 2016. In March, I ended up scoring 76 despite under performing in section 1 after taking painkillers for a fever and feeling very groggy during section 1. After 3 months of self study - (I started preparation five months before the exam but mostly wasted time on the two months chasing down resources and figuring out what the exam was all about!). I scored S1: 64, S2: 86 & S3: 76.

    For the September exam, my total score went up to 82. A rise in both S1 and S3, and a slight drop in S2. I think the S1 rise is attributable simply to more practice, S2 drop was due to not practising essays anymore (got fed up) and the S3 increase was due to practice and better understanding of Physics.

    The reason I sat the September exam was because I was told by a lot of people that the September exam is actually 'easier' and the distribution is more favourable to get higher marks. Having sat both, I wouldn't say this is true, as the September exam was in some ways a lot of harder and more data analysis driven than the March counterpart.

    I was also able to secure four offers on my first attempt (St George's, Nottingham, Swansea and Exeter) - so I have written a section below on how to best prepare for MMI interviews.

    Previous to taking up GAMSAT, I did Economics at university and worked in Investment Banking. For A levels, I hadn't done any sciences (I did Maths, Further Maths, Economics, Politics, Music & French). At university I wrote a handful of short essays in my first year, and none since.

    As a result, I was approaching all sections of the GAMSAT at the worst possible starting point. I wasted an incredible amount of time looking for appropriate resources, and there is a huge amount of misinformation on the internet with what the appropriate resources are and hopefully I can help with regard to this and the best way to revise for the exam. There are a lot of 'agents' posing to be users and trying to give their books a good reputation on the forums. In addition, there are people who sell books (especially on gumtree) but the books are not what they are described to be, so I urge you to be especially diligent when buying second hand books and not end up wasting money and energy like I did.

    If you have specific questions about each section, or about what study materials I used, feel free to message me or post here, and I will look to get back to you as soon as possible. Here is however a quick snapshot of the material that I came across with another friend who I was studying with. This is how we thought they ranked.

    Collins Advanced Science 8/10: good for general knowledge, if you are jumping into the science at the deep end. However Khan academy and online resources are more than good enough to learn the science from, even from scratch.

    GAMSAT Gold Standard 3/10: other than the practice paper at the end of the book, this book pissed me off. It's marketed as the holy grail of GAMSAT, but it's way too shallow, and the stupid cat animation drove me crazy.

    Grad Med Science books & sample exam papers 8/10: Organic chemistry is not great, physical chemistry, biology and physics good. Exam papers, very similar to the real thing. Don't go on the course, just get the material cheap second hand. I would prioritise in getting some of the past exam papers over the 'textbooks'. Nice to have but not crucial.

    Ozimed Sample Papers 7/10: Very recall based, so unlike GAMSAT in this respect, but a good starting point to check your science knowledge. Verbal reasoning, way too easy.

    Guru Method 7/10: It's decent. Nothing spectacular, their collection of questions are fairly similar to the GAMSAT.

    Medprep Sample Papers 7/10: Fairly similar to actual GAMSAT.

    Des O'neill 9/10: Epic question bank, endless questions, several practice papers. All the practice you need and more. You can get it cheap as PDF.

    Griffiths Review 8/10: Good overview, cheap, worth getting.

    N.B. Obviously get the acer material! I also found the Organic Chemistry for Dummies book rather good for learning organic chemistry from scratch.

    If you are smart, you really shouldn't be spending more than 150 pounds even if you were to procure ALL (excepting the Collins Advanced Science Books - you can however find these in the local libraries, but even then Khan academy and online resources are more than good enough) the materials listed above. Don't get ripped off!

    Update 1
    Now that I have some time, I have written an overview for the three sections.

    Overview for section 1
    The best way to improve in this section is to practice, practice and practice. Go back to each error you make and try and understand the specific set of critical reading skills that you are weak at. You will find that your weaknesses will tend to follow a general pattern. For example, I was never very strong at poetry analysis. If sufficient time passes, come back to the same questions and attempt them again, and see if you are improving in your weak areas. When the going gets tough, always remember, critical reading skills will stay with you for the long run, it's not like most other exams where you learn something for one exam only to forget it all a week later.

    Overview for section 2
    It is imperative that you start early and aim to write one or two essays everyday. Initially spend 45 minutes or so per essay really sculpting it. Make it into a model essay, research good examples that you can use etc. Closer to the exam, start speeding up and doing it all under timed conditions. Aim for 450-500 words.

    The trick here is twofold, it is very unlikely for you on the exam day to sculpt two completely original 80+ essays in an hour.

    The first trick is that good old regurgitation really helps in this regard, this is because the themes tend to overlap quite a lot. If you have written 30+ essays, you will find that you can regurgitate the well researched and well sculpted content from various essays that you used previously - like a pastiche.

    The second trick is the 'titling of the essay'. You can provide clarity for the markers by providing a title for the essay. I normally used titles that were questions e.g. 'Is big government or small government more beneficial for societal well-being?' - it complements the essay structure that I have outline below (intro, for, against, synthesis (conclusion)). I cannot stress the importance of effective titling, because it allows you to direct the essay into an area where you have interest in (or into an area where you have written previous essays in) even if the quotes may not be explicitly referring to such an area. For example if politics and government are your areas of interest, quotes regarding surveillance could be transformed into an essay that is about state surveillance. Likewise, quotes regarding leadership can also be transformed into an essay about different government leadership structures and so on.

    I use the same structure for Task A and Task B. If you have this framework, you won't waste time trying to plan the essay in the exam.
    Task A & B - Introduction, argument 1, argument 2 (counter argument), conclusion (synthesis)
    Task A - tends to be sociocultural/philosophical questions
    Task B - tends to be more personal and reflective topics

    Tone for task A - third person, more academic. Try and bring in factual examples, statistics, data, anything that you can use to show off your worldly knowledge! I think this is what really makes this essay shine.
    Tone for task B - I normally approached these more personally and in a first person voice. However, the quotes can sometimes be interpreted in a more 'task A' manner and if so, feel free to write the essay in a task A style.

    Overview for section 3
    You will find that the traditional method of revision isn't very effective for the GAMSAT - e.g. going through the textbook and making notes etc.

    I would recommend that you first attempt an ACER paper and try and get familiar with the GAMSAT style. You will then appreciate how the exam is very much about 'processing information' rather than regurgitating it for section 3, and you can direct your revision time and structure more effectively. You will also find that even without any science background, you can answer a surprising proportion of the questions through logic.

    I used the Griffiths Review 'syllabus' as a rough guide and this http://www.gamsat.ie/ website 'syllabus' as a more in depth guide to structure my learning.

    When tackling the topics, always make sure you have a solid conceptual understanding of what is going on. This is the most crucial aspect for success in section 3. This way, memorising formulas will be easy, as you can derive it rather than rely on rote memorisation. This can help save valuable time in section 3 as you will be under intense time pressure. Often the blurb provides more than sufficient information for you to solve questions, but ACER likes to distort simple formulas to catch you out, by switching out the variables etc.

    The rest is again practice, practice and practice. The Des O'Neill is perfect for this.

    If you have any further queries, drop them here!

    Update 2
    This section is dedicated for MMI interview preparation.

    Firstly, GEM MMI interviews' primary goal is not to try and catch you out or to try and test your intellectual capability. Just by crossing the GAMSAT threshold, the universities deem that you are intelligent enough to handle the rigours of a medical degree.

    Instead what they seek in my opinion are three things.
    1. How well you understand the realities of medicine.
    2. How introspective you are - whether you understand your limitations and how you go about overcoming these.
    3. How composed you are during the interview.

    The third factor is often overlooked but given that at each station, all that the interviewers know about you is your name, it's incredibly important to look assured. As a Doctor, you will be in situations far more stressful than interviews and if you can't handle interview nerves, you are going to come across poorly - I can guarantee you that most if not all candidates are terrified prior to the interview. The key is to have a mindset where you know you deserve the place and why the medical school needs a fine future Doctor.

    To attain such a mindset effectively, you need to buttress it with the necessary preparation. The first is getting some quality work experience under your belt and the second is to prepare for the MMI questions that you will face.

    Work Experience
    MMI interviewers follow a script so it's crucial to keep your answers personal and interesting. To do so, you need to look beyond the 'HCA work' which GEM universities love to recommend. In your work experience, try and organise both clinical and non-clinical experiences whilst covering areas that are particularly topical. Keep a journal - always reflect on what you can do better, how the patient may perceive your actions and what you can do to improve in your service delivery. Never forget to constantly think from the patient's perspective. If you can show off these qualities during interview, you will really separate yourself from the other candidates. Also, make sure to read the surrounding literature in areas that you volunteered in as well as in areas that you are interested in.

    I volunteered at
    1. A hospital ward (basically doing HCA work).
    2. A charity for the elderly (I interacted with a lot of dementia patients) - another topical area.
    3. A charity for the mentally ill - again another hugely topical area.
    4. A charity for disabled children.

    These experiences meant that I was able to cover a wide demographic and different conditions that require different skill sets. This also meant that I could provide personal yet professional examples for every question that I faced during the MMI interviews.

    MMI Prep
    This book is the holy grail.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Medical-Int...icard+medicine

    I made a word document that consisted of every single question in this book (even the traditional interview questions are very applicable to the MMI) and made a framework answer for those questions using my own personal examples. As the MMI is nerve wracking, hectic and often short (it feels very short) it's notoriously difficult to provide structured and clear answers. However, approaching the preparation this way ensures that you can give concise and coherent answers under pressure. It is important to note that you prepare a framework answer for every question instead of writing out model answers. The latter is often very counterproductive as you can sound rehearsed, whereas a framework gives you a clear plan to work with and the intermediate sentence structures are improvised on the spot which means that it does not sound rehearsed.

    After making this document (36 pages in Word), I read it two or three times every month and by the interview time, I knew exactly how I was going to answer every question. The framework method also works as most of the interview questions are variants of one another - especially the ethics questions.

    Read up on the NHS (read journals by both right wing and left wing think tanks) - read some papers that pit the NHS against more privatised systems in Europe that have far better health outcomes (the IEA has a good paper on this). Don't offer the usual platitudes about how great the NHS is. Acknowledge that the underpinning principles of the NHS are admirable but that reforms should be implemented to improve health outcomes.

    Read the documents that are mentioned in the aforementioned book (such as the GMC's good medical practice).

    Read journals on areas that you are interested in, or in areas that you are volunteering in. Be as proactive as possible.

    Go on the Medic Portal MMI mock session. It was impressively similar to the real thing. They also give you great feedback on how you can improve your performance.

    Try and do as many practice questions as you can with somebody who you feel slightly awkward with. It's too comical when doing it with people you are too comfortable with.
    Hi...do you have gradmed science books anf exam papers?
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    Very nice review of GAMSAT and GEM admissions. You've strengthened my confidence of getting a place.
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    Hey Osiris,

    Could you please send me a message in regards to the purchase of the PDF's which you possess please.
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    This is fantastic advice, thank you very much. Were all of your offers to the accelerated four year graduate courses out of curiousity?
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    Hi there!

    If someone gets a higher GAMSAT score in september and prefer that over March results, but obviously have already completed your UCAS application, could you still update your uni application of your new results? If yes, how do you do it? Is it just a matter of e-mailing/calling up unis? Thank you 😊
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    (Original post by med237)
    This is fantastic advice, thank you very much. Were all of your offers to the accelerated four year graduate courses out of curiousity?
    Three were one was for a five year.
    (Original post by sheryl_31)
    Hi there!

    If someone gets a higher GAMSAT score in september and prefer that over March results, but obviously have already completed your UCAS application, could you still update your uni application of your new results? If yes, how do you do it? Is it just a matter of e-mailing/calling up unis? Thank you 😊
    Yup that’s correct. I think Acer provides info directly so they will look at the higher score.
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    Hi I have sat the gamsat 5 times now and not even got near to the pass mark. I’m really stuck on what to do. Please can you help me, I have tried different methods for each time, from improving my logic reasoning to improving my knowledge. Nothing seems to work, what am I doing wrong?
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    (Original post by Osiris Wintereisse)
    I've posted a message on your profile.
    Hi are you still selling this?? Quite desperate for the material would be great help!!!
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    HeyThis might be a stupid question. Pardon me as i m giving for first time. The gamsat is paper based or computer based? Essays: do we need to type them or write them in paper with pen. It has been awhile since i have written anything. My writing speed is severe disadvantage...
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    Hi guys, I sat Gamsat march 2018 achieving 58, 80, 56 (total 62).

    For me, it had been over 15 years since I sat GCSE science and I left it there so it was difficult to get the science up to scratch. There are a few syllabuses around and I would argue no single one is definitive. I have got some useful tips I can give and a set of notes for sale so do PM me if you need anything to help you on your studies. Otherwise best of luck with the September sitting!

    Very happy to answer questions you might have as I found the forums really useful throughout as a source of knowledge and motivation.
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    (Original post by Vidushi chugh)
    Hi are you still selling this?? Quite desperate for the material would be great help!!!
    I have a Des O'neil, Ozimed, Griffith review and grad med, if you're still looking for materials! Just send me a pm
 
 
 
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