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Are unconditional offers actually unconditional? Watch

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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    the ' unconditional if firmed' offier is NOT an unconditional offer in the terms that the vast majority of people understand it to be ...

    a genuine unconditional UCAS offier is only given if you already hold the qualifications required to enter the course.
    So there are different sorts of unconditional offers?
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    Bizarre, it just says that I should keep doing it because of future employers and that sort of thing. Obvs if it has a grade requirement then it isn't an unconditional.
    You dont mind me asking, what uni gave you the offer and what terms did they say within the letter they sent you?
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    So there are different sorts of unconditional offers?
    before the cap on student numbers was removed there was only one sort of Unconditional Offer , these were given when the applicant all ready had sufficient weight and quantity of level 3 awards

    'Unconditional if firmed' is very new invention and isn't really tested especially with the move back to linear A levels rather than AS being taken at the end of y12 and UCAS applicants applying with AS actual and A2 predicated grades.
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    (Original post by The Sikh Surgeon)
    It means you dont have to get certain grades to get in. The university has to let you in even if you fail (which im sure you wont )
    (Original post by ILikePasta)
    All you have to do is pass your course to get in. If you're unsure you should check with the uni what grade or how many UCAS points you need.
    (Original post by Juno)
    You need to complete the course.

    You could, if you chose, submit all your assessed work as a picture of a monkey and deliberately fail. Or you could try your hardest and still fail. But you need to actually finish the course and receive a grade, even if that grade is "fail". Dropping out would leave you with no grade and so wouldn't count.
    (Original post by Pigster)
    It means that you have already fulfilled all of their criteria for accepting you, i.e you could drop out of school now and they'd still let you in.

    That is what unconditional means - there are no conditions to their offer.

    Most people have conditional offers, e.g. we will let you in on the condition that you get XYZ grades in your A levels / BTEC etc.
    *sigh*

    So if I were to fail hypothetically, would they let me in? Does anyone no for sure? lol
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    So if I were to fail hypothetically, would they let me in? Does anyone no for sure? lol
    As with so many legal documents, the devil is in the small print.

    Phone them up and say, "I am obviously not going to drop out of my course/s as I will be wanting to use my results on my CV, but can I confirm that this offer is actually unconditional? It will be such a weight off my mind to know and will allow me to properly concentrate on my studies."
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    (Original post by BigMan Ting)
    You dont mind me asking, what uni gave you the offer and what terms did they say within the letter they sent you?
    Don't know if I ought to specify the university or not.

    The letter it says that I need to choose it as firm and 'your place for September 2017 will then be secured'.

    It goes on to say that any other requirements applicable to the course must be met, but nothing about what I am asking.

    It says 'there are two reasons that it is important to keep working hard': achievement scholarship and future employers.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    As with so many legal documents, the devil is in the small print.

    Phone them up and say, "I am obviously not going to drop out of my course/s as I will be wanting to use my results on my CV, but can I confirm that this offer is actually unconditional? It will be such a weight off my mind to know and will allow me to properly concentrate on my studies."
    Yeah, it would be helpful if they clarified the terms of the offer before I accepted it.
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    I would expect that 'unconditional' in my case means that it would be possible to fail otherwise they would have said the minimum grade, though I don't know how it would work if I failed one unit (hypothetically), I suppose I would contact them then, and cross that bridge if I came to it (which I wont ).
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    I would expect that 'unconditional' in my case means that it would be possible to fail otherwise they would have said the minimum grade, though I don't know how it would work if I failed one unit (hypothetically), I suppose I would contact them then, and cross that bridge if I came to it (which I wont ).
    usually unconditional means that as long as you pass you're in. There's no criteria you need to meet in terms of grades/portfolio, just get your qualification. But like a lot of people have said. Ring admissions and ask them.
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    (Original post by ILikePasta)
    usually unconditional means that as long as you pass you're in. There's no criteria you need to meet in terms of grades/portfolio, just get your qualification. But like a lot of people have said. Ring admissions and ask them.
    If that is the case, then it is very misleading. They ought to stipulate that it must be at a pass. Nowhere does it make any mention of that, perhaps it will when I accept it.
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    If that is the case, then it is very misleading. They ought to stipulate that it must be at a pass. Nowhere does it make any mention of that, perhaps it will when I accept it.
    I don't think its misleading. Its very obvious that you need to have the right qualifications and there shouldn't be a need to mention it.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    I don't think its misleading. Its very obvious that you need to have the right qualifications and there shouldn't be a need to mention it.
    It is a condition, another way of stating a minimum requirement. Of course they should mention it, as it means that it is not unconditional ffs. You think that there is 'no need to mention' that an unconditional offer is actually conditional?
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    If that is the case, then it is very misleading. They ought to stipulate that it must be at a pass. Nowhere does it make any mention of that, perhaps it will when I accept it.
    You don't need to pass it - you need to complete it.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    You don't need to pass it - you need to complete it.
    I will go on this assumption.
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    It is a condition, another way of stating a minimum requirement. Of course they should mention it, as it means that it is not unconditional ffs. You think that there is 'no need to mention' that an unconditional offer is actually conditional?
    no when its something so basic. Whats the point of doing A-levels/Btec if unis accept people without them?
    It never crossed my mind that someone would think unconditional means you can fail and still get in.

    I don't think it states anywhere in your unconditional offer that you have to pay for your degree but that doesn't mean you can just turn up and graduate without paying your fees
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    I don't think its misleading. Its very obvious that you need to have the right qualifications and there shouldn't be a need to mention it.
    the should return to the EE/EEE /PPP offer rather than call them unconditional if firmed
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    no when its something so basic. Whats the point of doing A-levels/Btec if unis accept people without them?
    It never crossed my mind that someone would think unconditional means you can fail and still get in.

    I don't think it states anywhere in your unconditional offer that you have to pay for your degree but that doesn't mean you can just turn up and graduate without paying your fees
    Fees have nothing to do with academic requirements, unstated academic requirements are academic requirements, the conditions referring to academic requirements. I don't really understand the idea behind unconditional offers but I got one and can only assume that they are as the name and the omission of anything stating otherwise suggests: unconditional.

    At least half the people who have responded seem to be under the impression that the condition is that you 'complete' it, as any offer would be based on the qualifications as mentioned in the UCAS application, so I think its clear that it is far from obvious.
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    Fees have nothing to do with academic requirements, unstated academic requirements are academic requirements, the conditions referring to academic requirements. I don't really understand the idea behind unconditional offers but I got one and can only assume that they are as the name and the omission of anything stating otherwise suggests: unconditional.

    At least half the people who have responded seem to be under the impression that the condition is that you 'complete' it, as any offer would be based on the qualifications as mentioned in the UCAS application.
    complete=pass. Unless your course is marked only based on attendance, completion means passing the final exam/coursework or whatever is used as a mean of assessment.
    Have a look on what your school defines as completion of the course, cause IMO failing is not completing it
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    no when its something so basic. Whats the point of doing A-levels/Btec if unis accept people without them?
    It never crossed my mind that someone would think unconditional means you can fail and still get in.
    That's the risk the university takes. They are willing to take the risk because it guarantees them a student on their books.

    Equally it's a reason why UIF offers can be bad for candidates because they might not bother working as hard at their qualifications and do less well than they might have, or worse, fail. This can then come back to haunt them if they later consider changing university (1000s of students change course/uni every year) but can't because they don't meet the new universities entry requirements, or they have to put the "weak" or failing grades on their CV.

    But so long as they complete the qualification - i.e. complete the course and sit any exams (if the course is examined) - then they meet the terms of their application, and therefore the UIF offer.

    TL;DR. They don't have to pass, they just have to complete.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    the should return to the EE/EEE /PPP offer rather than call them unconditional if firmed
    Because a U (in A-level terms) is acceptable. They don't even need an E.

    But an X would not be acceptable because that would indicate a no-show at the exam.
 
 
 
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