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    (Original post by jneill)
    But so long as they complete the qualification - i.e. complete the course and sit any exams (if the course is examined) - then they meet the terms of their application, and therefore the UIF offer.

    TL;DR. They don't have to pass, they just have to complete.
    I swear to God, UK has like one of the worst educational systems I came across.
    In Poland, you don't get to sit the final exam if your grades are too weak.
    In Belgium, you don't get a diploma if you fail your exams.
    But in the UK, you just have to turn up and voila, you completed your education!
    I guess it may have something to do with universities being free/of very small fee in the first two, while in here the university receives a lot of money even if the student drops out/fails.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    I swear to God, UK has like one of the worst educational systems I came across.
    In Poland, you don't get to sit the final exam if your grades are too weak.
    In Belgium, you don't get a diploma if you fail your exams.
    But in the UK, you just have to turn up and voila, you completed your education!
    I guess it may have something to do with universities being free/of very small fee in the first two, while in here the university receives a lot of money even if the student drops out/fails.
    It's not quite like that.

    They don't get the money if the student then drops out of the degree - well they get the tuition fee up until they drop out.

    But yes I fundamentally agree that UIF offers are bad for students. They used to be rare and reserved for outstanding students, but now some universities see them as a useful marketing strategy.

    It's nothing to do with the UK "educational system" per se - it's just the way some universities are "manipulating" this particular element of it.

    Edit: and if it's so bad why are you applying here?
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    So, something I've read which is interesting The University of London has basic entry requirements for all students enrolling on it's course of like straight Cs or someting, even if you get an unconditional offer you must meet these terms to be admitted to a UoL course. I am not sure if that is the case with other universities.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    I swear to God, UK has like one of the worst educational systems I came across.
    In Poland, you don't get to sit the final exam if your grades are too weak.
    In Belgium, you don't get a diploma if you fail your exams.
    But in the UK, you just have to turn up and voila, you completed your education!
    I guess it may have something to do with universities being free/of very small fee in the first two, while in here the university receives a lot of money even if the student drops out/fails.
    Unis only give out unconditional offers (even the unconditional if firmed offers) to students who meet certain criteria. To get one, you have to be a good student. So the chance of someone who has excelled at GCSE, and then has high A Level predictions (or equivalent) failing isn't very much. Most students realise they need their grades for more than just uni entry, and will still continue to work hard so that they can apply for graduate schemes or whatever afterwards.
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    (Original post by Michael_Fishy)
    So, something I've read which is interesting The University of London has basic entry requirements for all students enrolling on it's course of like straight Cs or someting, even if you get an unconditional offer you must meet these terms to be admitted to a UoL course. I am not sure if that is the case with other universities.
    Source?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's not quite like that.

    They don't get the money if the student then drops out of the degree - well they get the tuition fee up until they drop out.

    But yes I fundamentally agree that UIF offers are bad for students. They used to be rare and reserved for outstanding students, but now some universities see them as a useful marketing strategy.

    It's nothing to do with the UK "educational system" per se - it's just the way some universities are "manipulating" this particular element of it.

    Edit: and if it's so bad why are you applying here?
    I meant till university level.
    I like the fact that I don't have to learn all the useless ******** and only stuff that are relevant to my degree.
    Also, the non-academic facilities are much better here I think. I wish there was more educational societies set up, but overall I don't think I could explore my hobbies to such extend in any of these countries mentioned before.
    And of course, a degree from British university holds higher value than a degree from Polish or Belgian university.

    But since we are already discussing that, I think it would benefit young Brits more if they didn't have to select 4 A levels and basically drop everything else.
    Not only its hard to know what you want to do with your life when you are 16, I believe its important to be educated in many areas, even if you don't want to link your future with it.
    I am a medical student, but can speak 4 languages, have a good understanding of philosophy and can play most sports (usually badly, but I know the rules). I don't think that would be the case if I attended British 6th form.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    But since we are already discussing that, I think it would benefit young Brits more if they didn't have to select 4 A levels and basically drop everything else.
    Not only its hard to know what you want to do with your life when you are 16, I believe its important to be educated in many areas, even if you don't want to link your future with it.
    I am a medical student, but can speak 4 languages, have a good understanding of philosophy and can play most sports (usually badly, but I know the rules). I don't think that would be the case if I attended British 6th form.
    Yes that's certainly true (and for most it's 3 not 4 A-levels), and in particular MFLs are decreasing in popularity which is highly regretable.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yes that's certainly true (and for most it's 3 not 4 A-levels), and in particular MFLs are decreasing in popularity which is highly regretable.
    Well, they aren't particularly useful in terms of future academic career and I can see why people would rather select biology, maths, economics or psychology. Languages are useful in life and its actually quite satisfying to be able to understand foreigners. But then again, I wouldn't select languages over bio, chem and physics.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Because a U (in A-level terms) is acceptable. They don't even need an E.

    But an X would not be acceptable because that would indicate a no-show at the exam.
    a U is not a successfully completed level 3 qualification .
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    (Original post by ILikePasta)
    usually unconditional means that as long as you pass you're in. There's no criteria you need to meet in terms of grades/portfolio, just get your qualification. But like a lot of people have said. Ring admissions and ask them.
    until this 'unconditional if firmed' marketing shite was allowed by UCAS and Unconditional Offer meant only one thing - that at the time of the offer being made you held sufficient suitable qualifications to enter the course.

    this generally meant you have completed your studies in england/ wales/ NI although some Scottish system educated people would get unconditionals based on Highers when doing av highers /CSYS .
    the other common place for unconditionals in the olden days was Studio based Art degrees ( often as peopel had completed A levels and were doing the Art foundation course at their local art college) and Performance focused Music and Dance degrees where peopel were often offering grade 6- 8 and 'vocational ' exams as well as their A levels



    if a University wanted to ensure a promising student came to them they would make a low offer - in theory as low as EE/EEE ( 4 or 6 'original' UCAS points - there have been a number of points systems since)
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    a U is not a successfully completed level 3 qualification .
    It is. It just isn't a pass. A U indicates that an applicant finished the teaching without being excluded, submitted any required coursework and entered and sat the exams.

    Completing a degree doesn't mean you've been awarded a degree. Completion <> pass.
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    Don't get why you're asking on here as nobody is likely to be an expert lol. Simply make a new email and send your university a cheeky email asking about that; just say you're asking out of curiosity or something, nothing wrong with thatt and it's likely to be more accurate
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    (Original post by azizadil1998)
    Don't get why you're asking on here as nobody is likely to be an expert lol. Simply make a new email and send your university a cheeky email asking about that; just say you're asking out of curiosity or something, nothing wrong with thatt and it's likely to be more accurate
    PQ (post above yours) and others on TSR *are* experts.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    PQ (post above yours) and others on TSR *are* experts.
    Well I meant if you want a definite answer then email them no? Better to get confirmation formally.
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    (Original post by azizadil1998)
    Well I meant if you want a definite answer then email them no? Better to get confirmation formally.
    But that's not what you typed. Contributors on TSR like PQ work in university admissions and are, indeed, experts. They are an invaluable resource.

    Of course OP can, and should, contact the university if they need clarification on any aspect of their application. But if everyone did that there'd be no need for this forum
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    (Original post by jneill)
    But that's not what you typed. Contributors on TSR like PQ work in university admissions and are, indeed, experts. They are an invaluable resource.

    Of course OP can, and should, contact the university if they need clarification on any aspect of their application. But if everyone did that there'd be no need for this forum
    Yeah bit of a mistype there soz about that lol. Ooo yeah the special purple people? I didn't know that, soz PQ


    Thats truee
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    If that is the case, then it is very misleading. They ought to stipulate that it must be at a pass. Nowhere does it make any mention of that, perhaps it will when I accept it.
    It's not misleading, it's logic. Otherwise what would be the purpose of college if you can just apply to university and get an unconditional offer? They want to ensure you have the minimum ability and qualification for the course level otherwise if you can't complete a course which is at a lower level how can you possibly cope with work that is often significantly more difficult.

    There would be literally no point in trying if you were given an unconditional offer and they didn't care if you passed or not. No offence but it sounds like you're incredibly lazy and don't even want to make an effort to pass, which if true means you won't get anything out of university besides debt.
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    (Original post by Nottie)
    But since we are already discussing that, I think it would benefit young Brits more if they didn't have to select 4 A levels and basically drop everything else.
    Not only its hard to know what you want to do with your life when you are 16, I believe its important to be educated in many areas, even if you don't want to link your future with it.
    I am a medical student, but can speak 4 languages, have a good understanding of philosophy and can play most sports (usually badly, but I know the rules). I don't think that would be the case if I attended British 6th form.
    I am a UK student and will have completed A-levels in 10 subjects including Maths, three sciences, languages and humanities. So it can be done if you have the interest and ability. I am not alone and there are examples every year of 'Brits' doing something similar in our system.

    Incidentally, all my offers are unconditional. Meaning the grades I get for the 4 A-levels I take this summer will not affect my entry to the university I choose to attend.
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    (Original post by Ticktactical)
    *sigh*

    So if I were to fail hypothetically, would they let me in? Does anyone no for sure? lol
    I was studying BTEC got an unconditional offer and quit college. i emailed my uni asking if it was okay first obvs and they said my offer would still stand as i'm not required to meet any grades but they recommended i didn't quit for future career aspects. so i guess it's better to contact the uni
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    I got an unconditional offer which should be a good thing as I didn't even get the grades to do the course ... The cynic in me thinks it's up to just backfilling the course..
 
 
 
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